Citation
Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities

Material Information

Title:
Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities
Creator:
Laurie Taylor, PhD
Bess De Farber, MNM
Jessica Aberle, PhD
Miguel Asencio
Sharon Austin, PhD
Schuyler Esprit, PhD
Crystal Felima, PhD
Mirerza González, PhD
Margo Groenewoud, PhD
Hélène Huet, PhD
Melissa Jerome, MS
Debbie McCollin, PhD
Paul Ortiz, PhD
Mary Risner, EdD
Leah Rosenberg, PhD
Nadjah Rios Villarini, PhD
Margarita Vargas Betancourt, PhD
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Grant proposal

Notes

Abstract:
The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request $231,093 to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies.
Acquisition:
Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Danielle Sessions.
General Note:
Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities Program: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Request: $231,093

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.

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Descriptive Title: Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Submission Title: Opportunity ID: 20180313-HT Opportunity Title: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Agency Name: National Endowment for the Humanities

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Table of Contents Application For Federal Domestic Assistance Short Organizational V1.1 ..................................... 3 Research & Related Project/Performance Site Location(s) V2.0 ..................................................... 6 Supplementary Cover Sheet for NEH Grant Programs V3.0 ........................................................... 7 Attachments V1.0 ............................................................................................................................. 8 Budget Narrative Attachment Form V1.0 ....................................................................................... 83

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OMB Number: 4040-0003 Expiration Date: 7/30/2011 APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE – Short Organizational Version 01 1. NAME OF FEDERAL AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities 2. CATALOG OF FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE NUMBER: 45.169 CFDA TITLE: Promotion of the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities 3. DATE RECEIVED: SYSTEM USE ONLY 4. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY NUMBER: 20180313-HT TITLE: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities 5. APPLICANT INFORMATION a. Legal Name: University of Florida b. Address: Street 1: Street 2: 207 Grinter Hall PO Box 115500 City: County/Parish: Gainesville State: Province: FL: Florida Country: Zip/Postal Code: USA: UNITED STATES 32611-5500 c. Web Address: d. Type of Applicant: Select Applicant Type Code(s): e. Employer/Taxpayer Identification Number (EIN/TIN): H: Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Education 59-6002052 Type of Applicant: f. Organizational DUNS: 969663814 Type of Applicant: g. Congressional District of Applicant: FL-003 Other (specify) 6. PROJECT INFORMATION a. Project Title: Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities b. Project Description: The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request $207,749 to host a week-long, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experience and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty-six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies. c. Proposed Project: Start Date: 10/01/2018 End Date: 09/30/2020

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APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE – Short Organizational Version 01 7. PROJECT DIRECTOR Prefix First Name: Middle Name: Dr. Laurie Last Name: Suffix: Taylor Title: Email: Digital Scholarship Librarian laurien@ufl.edu Telephone Number: Fax Number: 352-273-2902 Street 1: Street 2: George A. Smathers Libraries PO Box 117024 City: County/Parish: Gainesville State: Province: FL: Florida Country: Zip/Postal Code: USA: UNITED STATES 32611-7024 8. PRIMARY CONTACT/GRANTS ADMINISTRATOR [ ] Same as Project Director (skip to item 9) Prefix First Name: Middle Name: Stephanie Last Name: Suffix: Gray Title: Email: Assistant Vice President ufproposals@ufl.edu Telephone Number: Fax Number: 352-392-9267 Street 1: Street 2: 207 Grinter Hall PO Box 115500 City: County/Parish: Gainesville State: Province: FL: Florida Country: Zip/Postal Code: USA: UNITED STATES 32611-5500

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APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE – Short Organizational Version 01 9. By signing this application, I certify (1) to the statements contained in the list of certifications** and (2) that the statements herein are true, complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge. I also provide the required assurances** and agree to comply with any resulting terms if I accept an award. I am aware that any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements or claims may subject me to criminal, civil, or administrative penalties (U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001) ** I Agree [X] ** The list of certifications and assurances, or an internet site where you may obtain this list, is contained in the announcement or agency specific instructions. AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE Prefix: First Name: Middle Name: Stephanie Last Name: Suffix: Gray Title: Email: Assistant Vice President ufproposals@ufl.edu Telephone Number: Fax Number: 352-392-9267 Signature of Authorized Representative: Date Signed Completed by Grants.gov upon submission Completed by Grants.gov upon submission. Standard Form 424 Organization Short (04-2005) Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102

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OMB Number: 4040-0010 Expiration Date: 10/31/2019 Project/Performance Site Location(s) Project/Performance Site Primary Location [ ] I am submitting an application as an individual, and not on behalf of a company, state, local or tribal government, academia, or other type of organization. Organization Name: University of Florida DUNS Number: 969663814 Street 1: George A. Smathers Libraries Street 2: 1545 W. University Ave. City: Gainesville County: Alachua State: FL: Florida Province: Country: USA: UNITED STATES ZIP / Postal Code: 32611-7024 Project/Performance Site Congressional District: FL-003 Additional Location(s):

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OMB Number: 3136-0134 Expiration Date: 6/30/2018 Supplementary Cover Sheet for NEH Grant Programs 1. Project Director Major Field of Study Interdisciplinary: Latin American Studies 2. Institution Information Type 1330: University 3. Project Funding Outright Funds $207,749.00 Federal Match Total from NEH $207,749.00 Cost Sharing $5,968.00 Total Project Costs $213,717.00 4. Application Information Will this proposal be submitted to another NEH division, government agency, or private entity for funding? [ ] Yes [X] No If yes, please explain where and when: Type of Application [X] New [ ] Supplement If supplement, list current grant number(s). Primary project discipline Interdisciplinary: Latin American Studies Secondary project discipline (optional) Interdisciplinary: General Tertiary project discipline (optional) Literature: General

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ATTACHMENTS FORM Instructions: On this form, you will attach the various files that make up your grant application. Please consult with the appropriate Agency Guidelines for more information about each needed file. Please remember that any files you attach must be in the document format and named as specified in the Guidelines. Important: Please attach your files in the proper sequence. See the appropriate Agency Guidelines for details 1) contents.pdf 2) staff.pdf 3) abstract.pdf 4) narrative.pdf 5) budget.pdf 6) appendices.pdf 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15)

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida Table of Contents List of Participants Abstract Narrative .. 1 Significance 1 Institutional Profile .. 2 Curriculum and Work Plan .. 3 Participants ... 8 Impact and Evaluation 9 Staff, Faculty, and Consultants 9 Budget 11 Appendices 15 Course Outline and Institute Schedule .. 15 Rsums 21 Graduate Assistant Job Description ... 55 Letters of Commitment .. 56

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida List of P articipants 1. Jessica Aberle, PhD, University of Florida 2. Miguel Asencio, MS, Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and Florida International University 3. Sharon Austin, PhD, University of Florida 4. Bess de Farber, MNM University of Florida 5. Schuyler Esprit, PhD, Dominica State College 6. Crystal Felima, PhD, University of Florida 7. Mirerza Gonzlez, PhD, University of Puerto Rico 8. Margo Groenewou d, PhD, University of Curaao 9. Hlne Huet, PhD, University of Florida 10. Melissa Jerome, MS, University of Florida 11. Debbie McCollin, PhD, University of the West Indies 12. Paul Ortiz, PhD, University of Florida 13. Mary Risner, EdD, University of Florida 14. Leah Rosenberg, PhD, University of Florida and dLOC 15. Laurie Taylor, PhD, University of Florida and dLOC 16. Nadjah Rios Villarini, PhD, University of Puerto Rico 17. Margarita Vargas Betancourt, PhD, University of Florida

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida Abstract The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request $ 231,093 to host a week long, in person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gai n DH teaching experience and in depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3 ) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials th at blend DH and Caribbean Studies.

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida Nar rative The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) request $2 31,093 to host a week-long, in -person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. Participants, especially from under-resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns, will gain DH teaching experien ce and in-depth knowledge of how to utilize digital collections in teaching. The Institute will provide training in tools, processes, and resources for developing lessons, modules, and/or courses. Twenty six participants will achieve: 1) acquisition of concrete digital skills and DH approaches for teaching and research utilizing Open Access digital collections; 2) participation in an enhanced community of practice for DH; and, 3) creation of Open Access course and teaching materials that blend DH and Caribbean Studies. Significance Digital technology has made the early 21st century a critical moment of opportunity for scholars of the Caribbean and especially for those working in the whole of the Global South. Digital archives have provided access to a wide range of library and archival materialsliterature, music, visual art, government records, scholarly works, historical newspapers, photographs, memoirs, postcards from across the region oral histories and more Many of these materials are now availab le as Open A ccess to the public. Coincidentally digital technology is providing new means of analyzing content (e.g., vis ualization and mapping ), presenting scholarship ( e.g., curated digital exhibits and websites), and teaching (e.g., online and hybr id c ourses). Together, these advancements pos e the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, enabling teach ing and research endeavors from this expanded body of materials. Already these materials and techniques are fostering paradigmaticshift s in scholarship such as the expansion of the Caribbean literary canon. Paradoxically, digital technology also is reproducing colonial hierarchy and marginalizing content from t he Caribbean and Global South. Migrating materials to digital archives has the potential both to replicate and to redress gaps and biases of colonial archives. A similar parallel pertains to digital technology. US government and corporate entities dominate the administration of the I nternet and an Anglo American technocultural b ias shapes its language, services, and instruments. Anglo American scholars and institutions dominate DH as well.1 These issues raise profound conceptual and practical questions about DH in scholarship related to the Global South. How can scholars utiliz e DH in ways that do not reaffirm colonial histories of archiving and education? This question has a particular urgency for Caribbean Studies scholars, teachers, and librarians Caribbean Studies is an interdisciplinary field with broad connections across languages and cultures. As defined by the Association of Caribbean University, Research, and Institutional Libraries, the Caribbean is the area of the Caribbean archipelago, the mainland countries including the Guianas, and the states of the United States which border on the Caribbean Sea or Gulf of Mexico.2 The Caribbean expands beyond these boundaries as a result of diasporic connections; similarly, Caribbean Studies exceeds disciplinary limits with the necessary interdisciplinary connections to adequately address languages, histories, and relationships. Research in the Caribbean is complicated further by immediate preservation concerns for materials given hurricanes sea level rise, and climate change. These factors all contribute to a greater ne ed for collaboration that is compounded by the distribution of scholars and librarians in this multidisciplinary area. Those in Cari bbean S tudies are scattered across many institutions Many who self-identify with Caribbean Studies are alone at their home institutions, and work with others who do not identify in the same manner. In parallel with these problems are tremendous opportunities resulting from more materials being openly available online, as is the case with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Now in its 14th 1 Domenico Fiormonte, Towards a Cultural Critique of the Digital Humanities, Historical Social Research/ Historische Sozialforschung 37, no. 3 (2012): 59, 62 63. https://www.jstor.org/stable/41636597 2 ACURIL Bylaws : https://acuril.org/terms 2/

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida y ear, dLOC is the largest Open Access collection of Caribbean materials, created by 44 partners, 17 in the US, and 27 international. dLOC is one of many Caribbean digital repositories ; and other repositori es include Caribbean materials. For example, Chronicling America which focuses on US newspapers, also includes newspapers from Puerto Rico, as well as a wealth of stories from and about the Caribbean an d the diaspora. This proposed institute will leverage digital tools to address issues of abundance in the digital age alongside the demand for digital approaches for Caribbean Studies. It i s important to note that Caribbean Studies federates fields that o verlap, connect, and interrelate such as, with African American Studies, Early American Studies, Black Studies, Visual Rhetoric, Art History, Gender Studies, and others. Caribbean Studies requires collaboration across fields that are often viewed as separate. The need for unification is often best addressed through DH practices that are tightly connected to collections. For example, the history of Panama and the P anama Canal illustrate US involvement in the region, and directly grapple with questions of migration, mobility, and sustainability. With Panamas separation from Colombia formalized in November 1903, newspapers carried the stories. T he December 12, 1903 issue of Washington, DCs Evening Star notes different major groups within Panamas diverse population. With over 100,000 West Indians migrating from the Caribbean to Panama, living and working with immigrants from India and Asia who relocated under indenture, the flows of people, workers sending funds home, and global trade all connected together. Newspaper stories follow with tales of great engineering achievement, alongside stories on migration, including the new 1913 laws against Chinese immigration The migration of people also produces new literary genres, as detailed in Coln Man a Come: Mythographies of Panama Canal Migration (2005). Telling the stories of migration, mobility, and sustainability requires the use of DH practices and tools to grapple with the complexity of the humanities questions, as well as the abundance of materials available for analysis. To address these varying assets and factors, t his proposed Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI ) will be anchored in the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability to connect across fields spanning precolonial to contemporary while including severa l languages. The se theme s provide a necessary platform to attract and serve a variety of participants in a productive manner where the ir diversity and range of expertise will inherently improve and amplify the depth and power of participant connections Participants in the Institute may potentially represent many institutions from multiple US regions, many fields, and differing professional roles. The CSDH I will provide necessary training in collaborative methodologies and DH teaching practices to suppo rt participants in creating DH teaching materials that provide engagement to meet participant needs for forming a community of practice, and field needs for developing research practices. The CSDHI will meet needs and present opportunities for cre ating context and expanding Open Access educational resources in Caribbean Studies. It will focus on a core set of digital repository resources and tools to develop a shared knowledgebase and toolset across practitioners A ctivities will foster community development among participants and with the larger community for Caribbean Studies and DH. Introducing and practicing using tools that contribute to the CSDHI theme s (including maps, Scalar, and oral histories ), on Caribbean content available from Open Access sources will expand participants' options for developing research and teaching questions and producing teaching resources in the form of course materials shared as Open Educational Resources to bridge research and teaching. Institutional P rofile The partners leading the CSDHI have each contributed to Caribbean Studies and DH teaching and research, and all have collaborated together over many years. University of Florida (UF) : A land -grant, seagrant, and spacegrant institution UF is uniquely positioned to delivery programs in Caribbean Studies and DH through its extensive research facilities UFs Center for Latin American Studies bega n as the Institute for InterAmerican Affairs in 1930, and was the first such research center in the US to focus on Latin America and the Caribbean. UFs George A. Smathers Libraries form the largest information network in the state of Florida and include spaces specifically designed for DH work. The primary spaces for hosting the proposed in -person week -long workshop will be the Scott Nygren Scholars Studio in

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida L ibrary West (Social Sciences Library) and the Visualization Lab in the Marston Science Library. Both are designed as flexible spaces for collaborative teaching with technology. Both seat 30, have large touchscreen displays, and have moveable desks and chairs to adjust the room arrangements for different workshop activities. D esigned as bring your ow n device spaces with the expectation that learning happens best in real scenarios, including evaluating, selecting, and using software on learners own machines. T he Libraries maintain over 3 0 loaner laptops available for use for any participants without laptops. Gainesvilles population reduces significantly in the summer, presenting many oppor tunities for housing. UF Housing includes specific options for conferences and events in summer months with multiple on -campus, affordable housing options including meals The Libraries hold rich collections for collection -focused sessions. The Latin American & Caribbean Collections are among the largest and most distinguished collections in the US and have been described as the finest collection of Caribbeana in the world. Other collections with rare and unique Caribbean holdings include the Baldwin Library of Historical Childrens Lite rature ( with over 150,000 volumes, and over 6,000 in its digital collections ) and the Price Library of Judaica and its Jewish Diaspora Collection (JDoC) of Judaica and Jewish history in Florida, Latin America, and the Caribbean. UFs resources for the CSDHI include expertise in research and teaching in DH with attendant communities and technologies, including the Digital Humanities Graduate Certificate Progr am team, Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) with over 300 members across campus, and the large collaborative team that works with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) UF is a founding partner in the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Digital Library of the Car ib b ean (dLOC): O ne of the oldest digital programs in Caribbean Studies founded in 2004, dLOCs mission focuses on preserving and making a ccessible Caribbean materials. As the largest Open Access collection of Caribbean materials, dLOC was created collaboratively through national and international partners hips with academic institu t ions, libraries and museums which continually contribute ma terials, shared governance, and ongoing visioning for expanding dLOC as a research and teaching commons. dLOC partners and scholarly collaborators have sought opportunities to lev erage these vast collections for teaching, research, and expanding Caribbean Studies. These activities have included engagement on shared questions about how to build Caribbean Studies through and with DH Because of dLOCs critical role in contributing to opportunities for broadening the meaning and value of Caribbean S tudies in the digital age, partners have undertaken initiatives including creating Open Access teaching materials, curating online exhibits, and creating a Distributed Online Collaborative Course (DOCC) series ( Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean, 2013; Reimagining Diasporas, Archives, and the Humanities 2016; and Migration and Mobility, 2017). To achieve these ends, dLOC collaborators created new DH resou rces for teaching with collections, identified and digitized additional collection materials, and developed new trainings and practices to expand capacity among partners. dLOC's scholars and librarians have fostered collaborative practices to connect exper ts in DH technologies by serving as guest lecturers and contributors for courses, workshops, and training programs at different institutions. Additionally, dLOC continues to host an ongoing webinar series for Caribbean Studies in the Digital Age, coordinated by dLOC team members at UF based on scholar, instructor, and partner interests. The CSDHI online workshops will utilize the current format for the webinar series, with live participation and recordings available in dLOC. dLOC team members who will serve on the CSDHI project team have extensive experience in teaching and enabl ing DH research and teaching. The CSDHI team will draw upon dLOCs collective expertise in facilitating networks for teaching, technical training, and collection use for leading the asynchronous collab oration and virtual sessions during the Institute. Curriculum and W ork P lan T he CSDHI curriculum will cover DH tools and practices, collaborative teaching and methods for partnering within library and archival communities on teaching. The coordination and training assignments to be presented during the CSDHI will take place in five phases:

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida P hase 1 : Pre Institute March -May 2019: Distribution of asynchronous communication and reading assignments. T he CSDHI website and email list become available for initiating the community of practice among participants. P h ase 2 : In -person Session, May 2024, 2019: Week -long, inperson session at UF Initialde velopment of new DH Caribbean Studies teaching materials. P hase 3 : Virtual Sessions and As ynchronous Communication, July December 2019: Delivery of virtual sessions on technologies and practices. Ongoing asynchronous communication with participants. Refinement of teaching materials by participants Phase 4: Teaching Modules Development for Teaching DH Locally, JanuaryApril 2020: Participants develop and, if course selection allows, implement their DH course materials in early 2020. Ongoing asynchronous communication continues for the group through the email list. Phase 5 : Publication and Dissemination, May -August 2020: Final evaluation processes. P ublication of participants DH assignments and all resulting Institute materials, including the white paper. Promotion and dissemination of materials. T he Institutes overarching goals are that participants will learn and adapt DH tools and practices to meet their own needs for their students and for teaching and inclusion in a community of practice for DH pedagogy. The CSDHI curriculum will achieve three interconnected goals: 1) introduce participants to the processes of finding and using Open Access materials from digital repositories to provide a foundation for teaching through and building with DH ; 2) provide intensive training on tools and practices for analyzing, mapping, and presenting materials in relation to the themes of migration, mob ility, and sustainability; and, 3) provide intensive training in DH teaching methods for incorporating these practices and themes into classrooms as part of the ongoing process for sustaining a community of practice in Caribbean Studies. The Institute will begin with a series of readings to be completed prior to the in -person training to familiarize participants with core questions and practices in DH, in relation to Caribbean Studies. The primary training activities will take place during a week -long, in -person session hosted at UF, to be held May 20 -24, 2019. This training will provide participants with an intensive, hands -on DH demonstrations and pra ctice sessions for using Scalar, StoryMapJS, Google Maps, and TimelineJS. The Institutes featured t echnologies were selected based on the following criteria for enabling a community of practice across many fields disciplines, and geographical regions : 1) nocost; accessible across classes and institutions (e.g., not institutional subscriptions/singleinstitution limited services); sufficiently accessible for students such that the technology can be taught as coupled with the subject matter for teach ing and integration; 2) usable after the students and teaching team complete the class, to continue building for future courses; and, 3) ideally, usable on lower-bandwidth and without software beyond a web browser, to remove barriers to collaboration. During t he academic year following the in -person training (fall 2019-spring 2020) participants w ill get to know each others assets and interests and be gin interacting with leading experts in DH and digital pedagogy while sharing, and seeking resources and mentorship via the CSDHI s email list These exchanges will create the scaffolding for participant development of DH teaching materials through the identif ication and implementation of best pedagogical practices. The virtual sessions and asynchronous commu nication will provide mentorship and guidance for the completion of the ir teaching materials. The sessions, communication, and feedback and mentoring on DH teaching materials will facilitate individual capacity development and interdependent relationships necessary for forming a learning community through shar ed experiences, questions, and resources. Th is continuous supportive and highly resourced environment will encourage practice and implement ation of what participants have lea rn ed during the inperson training, while maintain ing relationships for ongoing mentoring and collaboration after they return to their home institutions. All CSDHI materials will be shar ed openly online, supporting DH and Caribbean Studies and related communities which share synerg ies in the themes.

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida P hase 1, PreInstitute, March -May 2019: Prior to the in -person session, participants will be asked to read several short pieces about DH pedagogy, Caribbean Studies and DH, and DH partnerships that have grow n research and teaching communities across many types of institutions and among professionals in differing roles (see Schedule in Appendix A). Prospective p articipants will submit s tatement s of interest as a means for applying to participate using the Institute website, which will be hosted through dLOC For the application, each participant will share descriptions of past and proposed teaching related to the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability. The statements of interest will inform participants DH work, and will be utilized by the dLOC community as profile s to spark referrals and crossconversations. Beyond profile information, the website will include resources, schedule, and email list information for participants, proje ct direct ors, guest faculty and invited collaborators. P hase 2: In -person Session, May 2024, 2019: Over the course of five days, participants will focus on DH tools and methods, as well as ways to apply these to their teaching and classrooms. P articipants will start the in -person I nstitute with varying skill levels and experience in using repositories, DH, and digital pedagogy. The in -person week has been organized to walk attendees through the gradient steps and pedagogical options for DH with Caribbean Studies across fields, disciplines, repositories, and institutions. Each day will offer handson sessions, where attendees will be introduced to skills and tools and coached through iterative practice s by experts. Daily pedagogical sessions wil l offer discuss ions on how these skills can be incorporated into individual teaching and courses. The Co -directors will lead pedagogical sessions throughout the week, with guest faculty participating. Collectively, the Co -directors have decades of experience bringing DH tools and methods into undergraduate courses, graduate courses, and professional training programs. With new skills and experiences, participants will be able to implement DH tools and approaches at their hom e institutions as they develop a set of DH course materials comprised of two (or more) lesson plans, assignments, or syllabi that engage in the topics of migration, mobility and sustainability using mapping, timelines, archives, or oral histories. The first day will orient participants to the broader vision for the Institute, in terms of intersections and opportunities with in Carib bean Studies DH. Being that the CSDHI is anchored in the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability, participants lik ely will represent institutions from multiple US regions, varying disciplines, and professional roles. To instill an appreciation of these differences, the introductory session will include a facilitated Collaborating with Strangers (CoLAB) Workshop which creates a caflike environment for facilitating three -minute, one -onone speed meetings. These conversations quickly produce connections, and ideas for partnerships, mentoring, or the sharing of new resources The CoLAB is critically important for grounding the Institutes overarching mission which recognizes that Caribbean Studies requires collaborative partnerships and relationships. T he creation of these relationships is indispen sable to establishing an environment that enables engagement across disciplines, roles, and scholarship themes. The first day will provide an orientation to dLOC and other relevant digital repositories for Caribbean DH teaching. Progressing forward with this information will be a handson session where participants will learn about and create metadata based on repository materials. The repository orienta tion will include metadata for using materials in new digital works (e.g., selecting and using repositories, rights evaluations for materials and repositories, metadata creation as part of citation with digital projects). During the final session of the first day, participants together will review and discuss the information included in their application pr ofiles to address questions on selecting repositories, as well as designing course questions and pedagogy in relation to time, space, and stories. Activities during the first day have been designed to support subsequent curriculum programmed for the following days, which cover timelines, maps, oral histories, and archives for DH teaching, along with related concerns including privacy intellectual property, crediting, and platforms for connecting DH tools. The second day will focus on humanities themes of mobility and movement for presenting and visualizing aspects of Caribbean Studies. This hands-on day will include sessions on using StoryMapJS, Google Maps, and TimelineJS. Participants in e ach session will use metadata created during the first d ay for consider ing different types of requisite information in relation to the tools and pedagogical goals. The

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida da y will focus on organizing and breaking down digital resources into granular data for present ations and visualiz ations through the use of maps and timelines. With the array of tools, participants will discuss how these representational tools do or do not fit into the learning objectives and pedagogical strategies of the courses they teach as well as how they might use digital repository materials and their data in the classroom based on the information these illuminate and questions they pose. It is important to note that several of these tools are design ed for integration within Scalar, another featured tool at the Institute During the second day, the training program will move into the archives for a hands -on session to delve into questions about what these tools can bring to the archives, to unearth new findings, respond to new questions of history and collections, and for classroo m production in telling stories of materials and placing materials in context. The final afternoon session will offer a facilitated discussion of archival practices for ways in which archives can inform and enliven DH teaching. This session will introduce the importance of accessing archives outside of and within local institutions. For the Into the Archives session, participants will have hands-on time with an unprocessed, analog Caribbean collection. This will prompt discussions on value, impact, and opportunities offered by digital tools and DH, including ways to utilize DH and analog collections to inspire students about research Day three will begin with a project review and discussion on The Diaspora Project which engages in th e creation, analysis, and synthesis of oral histories telling otherwise undocumented stories of individual and community migration. Progressing from this topic will be a pedagogical session in the archives, for hands-on introduction to an oral history archive which includes processed and unprocessed, analog and borndigital collections. P articipants will discuss DH classroom teaching with oral histories to share first -person voices and community stories, and to place materials in context A UF African American Studies professor will share ways to use oral history archives from the perspective of African American Studies and Caribbean immigration to the US, themes that connect within and beyond Caribbean Studies. For the remainder of the day, participants will take part in two applied sessions. The first will be a pedagogical session on finding and using oral histories, considerations of audio recordings and audiobooks, giving voice, and playlist pedagogy. The final session will be a workshop where each participant will create an assignment utilizing oral histories held in digital repositories, revealing the connection to themes, and noting courses they teach where the assignment s would be applicable. The se assignm ents may be refined throughout the remainder of the Institute as one of the two assignments. During the fourth day activities will focus on platforms for framing the DH classroom. The day will begin with a session on privacy, intellectual property, and assigning credit. Using platforms and repositories designed to enable public access, the discussion will include ways to apply these concerns to student online work. This will prepare participants for the next session, on the use of evaluation processes an d methods for utilizing repositories and platforms in class production, especially in discerning sustainability in terms of technologi es, standards, and support for the community of practice. The Caribbean foregrounds issues of sustainability, which a re a constant and critical concern for all digital projects. Sustainability will be discussed during sessions on platforms, as well as within all pedagogical sessions. T hese sessions will prepare for application during two Scalar workshops The first will cover creating a course website as a Scalar book including integrating oral histories and other digital repository materials. The second advances to cover integrating the previously created timelines and maps. In these sessions, participants will reflect on their new ly acquired skills, use of tools and methods to discuss ways to introduce and scaffold such tools with in instruction. Scalar workshops will focus on storing, sharing, and exhibiting the results of classroom DH project s. Hands-on tutorials will highlight ways to showcase multimedia materials, including timelines, maps, and oral histories taught at th e CSDHI D ay five will focus on sustainability in relation to pedagogy, DH, and fostering community development through designing, scoping, and scaffolding classroom DH assignment s that can be implement locally and shared for use in multiple courses. The discussion will lead into the pedagogical session on developing evaluation criteria and methods for evaluating and grading DH assignments. The Ca ribbean DH faculty for this session will draw upon their expertise in teaching and evaluating DH coursework from a variety of institutional types, course levels, and fields. Next participants will workshop DH and Caribbean Studies course materials, includ ing identifying plans for evaluation. The

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida f inal session will conclude with a facilitated discussion about considerations for invigorating the humanities by using DH within and across institutions opportunities for collaborative engagement within and beyond single institutions, and possibilities for contributing to shared resources to grow communities of practice. By t he conclusion of the in -person training each par ticipant will have gained sufficient skills and exposure to have c ompetence in conceiving of a DH unit, lesson, or module for implementation in their classroom s. They also will have produced a t least one draft assignment using oral histories. P hase 3: Virtual Sessions and Asynchronous Communication (July December 2019): When participants return to their home institutions, they will have frame works for developing DH assignment s. Five two hour virtual sessions will enable participants to flesh out these drafts with part icular attention to teaching DH for specific content, methods, and technologies Thus, each session will be devoted to the praxis of teaching through DH. Scheduled monthly (July, August, September, October, and November), these sessions will use the same general format: faculty instructors will present examples of their collaborative DH teaching, positives and limitations of that pedagogical experience and considerations for developing and teaching similar lessons. For the second part of each session, instructors will discuss a particular aspect of their DH pedagogy or a tool T opics selected will address key issues when teaching DH, beyond tool selection, about matching methods to research questions, learning objectives, and selecting other related courses for application The project t eam will use Zoom, for which UF maintains a subscription. Recordings of each session will be available on the dLOC site with a requirement that participants attend or listen to all sessions. Also, participants will be able to pose questions or comments, share resources, and brainstorm ideas at any time over the course of the I nstitute via the email list. Throughout the grant -period, Co -directors will respond to questions about skills, tools, and pedagogy, and will full y particip ate during discussions on various topics. The first session July 2019, will address the range of issues and problems to consider when teaching DH, alongside additional training on Scalar. Scheduled prior to the start of the academic year, the first session will address pedagogical practice for DH, both in and out side of the classroom and its relation to public humanities with Scalar as a platform The second session August 2019, will address tea ching with oral historie s. M any of the CSDHI participants will not teach a DH course, but will teach subjectbased courses or workshops organized around a discipline or theme, or will support undergraduate research project s. The instructor utilizes oral histories in teaching history classes as part of playlist pedagogy and oral history production as part of the making of history. The making-of historical resources and making-meaning of history through courses inflected with and through DH will provide insight into best practices for incorporating audiobased DH methods and tools into non DH classes. The third session September 2019, will address ways in which DH can create opportunities for undergraduate research that are new to the world and to the students. The instructor will discuss strategies for engaging undergraduates in Haitian Studies and to execute cultural analysis by using archives. Methods for public presentations of results will be included. T he fourth session October 2019, will focus on engaging students i n research with archives and m etadata. This session will take participants virtual ly into archives to review opportunities in unprocessed collections and collections processed without attention to the presence of diverse people. This session will showcase how participants can collaborate using digital and local a rchives to enhance metadata as part of DH teaching and for producing publicfacing projects, and metadata as part of DH ethics. The f inal virtual session i n November 2019 will introduce future opportunities for participants including engagement with larger DH and Caribbean Studies commu nities of practice. This session facilitated discussion will frame current work in creatin g, sustaining, and enhancing shared infrastructures for Caribbean Studies DH. This session will discuss ethical and practical issues, and methods for maintai ning and fostering collaboration using DH in teaching. Each session will offer participants new insights into ways to create and teach DH units. Each will give participants the chance to talk and learn about DH pedagogy with guest faculty, who are experienced leaders in this domain. The virtual sessions will provide additional context for DH

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida assi gnments, collab orative practices, opportunities to learn more about members of the community of practice, implications for public humanities, and methods for assessing student work. At the end of the virtual sessions, participants will be prepared to develop and implement their DH lessons. P hase 4: Teaching Modules Development for Teaching DH Locally, January-April 2020: P articipants will create two DH teaching items, which may take the form of lesson plans, assignments, syllabi, or related. Participants will, if course selection allows, implement their DH course materials in early 2020. Those who teach will be asked to sha re reflective writings on their teaching experiences related to specific DH materials. Those not teaching course materials developed during the Institute will be asked to provide a reflective assessment of their local resources and unmet needs if they were to teach the course sometime in the future This assessment will inform strategies for the community to collectively satisfy individual needs for DH teaching related to Caribbean Studies and connecting across courses featuring the themes. During this phase, ongoing communication will continue through the use of the email list. P hase 5 : Publication and Dissemination, May -August 2020: The final phase will collect and build upon the activities and discussions to date, and the session evaluation reports P articipants will be asked to complete a qualitative survey reflecting on the development, highlighting strategies they used and the particularities of teaching DH. During this final phase, participants will finalize the materials for the DH assignment s developed previously, and assess the Institute processes. T hey will share the materials for inclusion in the other teaching materials in dLOC. The project Co -directors will publish materials in dLOC They will promote the availability of the new materials and the white paper on va rious email lists, Twitter, and at onsite venues during conferences. Participants The CSD HI will be open to 26 participants who regularly teach Caribbean Studies courses or sections in courses in related fields. Participants will confirm interest in incorporating DH in their teaching and in collaborative practices. Car ibbean Studies is taught in history, literature, cultural studies, Black Studies, Global Studies, and more, with clas ses at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and with instructors, librarians staff, and graduate students. Recruitment will focus on attract ing participants who are interested in creating new resources for teaching Caribbean Studies in multiple fields a nd varying types of institutions as well as enhancing the community of practice for engaging with DH. The CSDHI will focus on supporting participants as community members to connect them with interested teachers who have access to primary resources and a need for complementary teaching resources and communities. P articipants will arrive at the training with minimal or no previous training, or having had some training and e xperience in teaching with DH. Recruitment of participants will begin immediately af ter the grant award is announced, in October 2018. Given that the I nstitute will seek to attract both those who do and do not identify with DH communities the call will be shared through DH venues as well as through various Caribbean Studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, literature, and history communities. Distribution v ehicles will include Twitter and Facebook (project team member and institutional accounts), email lists and professional organization forums (e.g., the Humanist, HASTAC H-Net, MLA Commons, Caribbean Commons, dLOC Global Outlook:: Digital Humanities, SHARP African American Intellectual History Society, American Studies Association HBCU Library Alliance ), and outreach through designated research centers focusing o n the Caribbean (e.g., Title VI Centers) and regional community network contacts (e.g., Keystone DH Texas Digital Humanities Consortium ). The call will direct interested participants to apply by February 1, 2019 by submitting a brief application via the CSDHI website A pplication s will consist of a CV and a statement of interest. In this statement, candidates will be asked to provide : 1) d escription of current teaching assignments and responsibilities ; and, 2) description of a course, proposed course, or sample syllabus that engages with the Caribbean through the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability. Applications will be reviewed by

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida a se lection committee comprised of the project Codirectors (Taylor, Huet, Ortiz, Rosenberg ) and expert representatives from the project team ( Asencio Felima ). The CSDHIs p riority will be to select a diverse mix of p articipants from institutions across the US including specifically recruiting from Puerto Rico the US Virgin Islands, HBCUs, and HSIs given the rich collections, communities, and teaching connections related to Caribbean Studies. Priority also will be given to select participants from various humanities fields. Additionally, while Florida is the third most populous stat e, Caribbean Studies spans the whole of the US as a home to the diaspora. For those selected from Florida, priority will be given to those from institutions not represented on the project team Applicants wi ll be notified of acceptance or declination in mid -February 2019. F or final acceptance starting in March, participants will confirm : 1) their attend ance for the in -person institute and virtual sessions; and, 2) that by June 2020 they will submit two DH assignment s, developed by taking part in the Institute, for inclusion in dLOC s Teaching Guides & M aterials C ollection for use by others. As with all materials in dLOC, participants retain all rights and may elect to share their materials via other repositories an d websites. Impact and E valuation Overall expected outcomes include increased capacity and community for DH in Caribbean Studies and related fields and courses related to the CSDHI themes. Assessment will include completion of several evaluation surveys by participants during the grant period. At the conclusion of the in-person I nstitute and the virtual session series, larger evaluative surveys will be conducted. These surveys will ask participants to reflect on skills and insights gained, plans for implementing what they learned, problems or possibilities encountered in implementing DH teaching, and outstanding questions or issues they would like to pursue. In addition, smallscale curricular evaluations will be completed after the unit or virtual session of each guest faculty member to assess the quality of the CSDHI instruction. Finally, participants will provide a self assessment of the assignments as taught or considerations for DH teaching at their local institutions. These evaluations, particularly the longer ones focused on peda gogical lessons learned, will produce key material for the final white paper dLOC commits to preserving the Institute website actively throughout the grant period and the materials following completion for longterm preservation and access. The resulting pedagogical materials and white paper will be published on dLOCs website under a Creative Commons license, and will be publicized through appropriate email lists, scholarly forums, Twitter communities, and in-person meetings including groups previously targeted for recruitment of applicants. The CSDHI Co -directors will share descriptions of impacts through several deliverables and out puts, including: participants teaching materials hosted through dLOC; white paper shared in dLOC; recorded training segments of the virtual sessions available in dLOC; and, when participants are able to teach their materials within the program time frame, reflective writings on their teaching experiences for these materials; or, reflective writings on their considerations for teaching their materials at their local institutions. Materials in dLOC will be featured in the T eaching Guides & M aterials C ollection for ease of findability. B roader impacts of this Institute will include: new course materials, changed teaching practices and course contents for all participants, new collaborative relationships, new experiences in teaching with DH, and new experiences and knowledge of teaching in connection with digital collections for supporting scholarly and public communities. These qualitative results will be accessed through evaluation and anecdotal feedback, and shared in t he white paper to document the focused attention and experience of in tegrating DH with interdisciplinary Caribbean Studies The white paper will describe the new capacities achieved by participants for utilizing open access collections, growing open access collections of teaching materials and changing community practices in terms of DH teaching that result, as well as, what future educational or experiential activities they will want to pursue. Staff, Faculty, and Consultants Co -directors Laurie N. Taylor, PhD, UF Digital Scholarship Librarian and dLOC Digital Scholarship Director

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida H lne Huet PhD, European Studies Librarian and DH Graduate Certificate Board member Paul Ortiz PhD, Associate Professor of History and Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Director Leah Rosenberg, PhD, Associate Professor of English and dLOC Scholarly Advisory Board Co Chair The Co -directors will lead pedagogical sessions at the in -person meeting and asynchronous communica tion field participants questions on the I nstitute email list support particip an ts in developing their DH teaching materials and provide mentoring for Caribbean DH teaching. They will conduct surveys and author the final white paper. They and three Institute Faculty ( Asencio Felima ) serve as the Selection Committee. In Person Institute Faculty {Those also Leading Virtual Session s, Noted (*)} Jessica Aberle, PhD, is the Architecture Librarian at the UF Architecture and Fine Arts Library. Her research project s explore the application of DH methodologies and tools for collection assessment, and DH to investigate and present intersection among place, memory, and identity.* Mi guel Asencio MS, is the Director of Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) based at Florida Int ernational University (FIU). He has an MS in Curriculum and Instruction, is pursuing a PhD in Learning Technologies, and is an expert on international collaboration and clas sroom technologies. Sharon Wright Austin, PhD, is Director of the African American Studies Program and AssociateP rofessor of Political Science at UF. Her most recent book is, The Caribbeanization of Black Politics: Race, Group Consciousness, and Political Participation in America (SUNY 2018). Bess de Farber, MNM, is the Libraries Grants Manager at UF and a Certified Professional Facilitator. She is author and co -author of two books on collaboration processes among libraries for the public good and translating work into the public sphere. Schuyler Espr it, PhD, is dean of Academic Affairs at Dominica State College ; director of the Create Caribbean Research Institute ; scholar of Caribbean literature and cultural studies ; and DH project and training leader at the K -12 and College levels, including linking US and Dominican students. Crystal Felima, PhD, is the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribb ean Studies Data Curation at UF.S he consults with researchers and scholars on emerging trends and best practices in DH, data curation, and escholarship in Caribbean Studies. Mirerza Gonzlez, PhD, is Director of the English Department and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Humanities at the University of Puerto Rico cofounder of The DiasporaP roject, exploring migration, bilingual education, and communication in St. Croix, USVI, with oral histories and other materials presented with DH methods and tools. M argo Groenewoud, PhD, is Faculty of History at the University of Curaao (UoC) where she researches and teaches DH drawing upon her experience as the Director of Libraries at UoC and her own research with oral histories and storytelling for digital pedagogy.* Melissa Jerome, MS, is Project Manager for the Florida & Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project (FPRDNP), responsible for overall project management, including overseeing outreach and publicity efforts for the public and specifically for teachers and classes. Debbie McCollin, PhD is Lecturer in the History Department at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago. She has taught a Digital H istory course since 2012. Her most recent co -edited publications is World War II and the Caribbean (UWI Press 2017) Mary Risner, EdD, develops and manages initiatives that integrate area studies across thec urriculum. She has taught various K16 levels and corpor ate environments. Her research focuses on emerging technologies for intercultural competence and foreign language skills for the workplace.* N adjah Rios Villarini, PhD, is Associate Professor at the University of Puerto Rico and co-founder of T he Diaspora Project, exploring migration, bilingual education and c ommunication in St. Croix,U SVI, with oral histories and other materials presented with DH methods and tools. Margarita Vargas Betancourt, PhD, is UFs Latin American & Caribbean Special Collections Librarian LACCHAs award -winning webinar series co -organizer, archivist collaborator onC aribbean DH course s, and D irector of an ARL Fellow for Digital & Inclusive Excellence.

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click for Budget Instructions Computational Details/Notes (notes)Year 1(notes)Year 2(notes)Year 3 Project Total 10/01/201809/30/2019 10/01/201909/30/2020 1.Salaries & Wages Project Director (Laurie Taylor) $99,334 (yr1); $102,314 (yr 2) 9.5% $9,437 5% $5,116 % $14,553 Co-director (Helene Huet) $64,739 (yr 1); $66,681 (yr 2) 9.5% $6,150 5% $3,334 % $9,484 Co-director (Paul Ortiz) $139,135 (yr 1); $143,309 (yr 2) 9.5% $13,218 5% $7,165 % $20,383 Co-director (Leah Rosenberg) $136,152 (yr 1); $140,237 (yr 2) 9.5% $12,934 5% $7,012 % $19,946 Graduate Assistant (TBD) $20/hr*40 hrs/wk*8 wks 100% $6,400 100% $6,400 % $12,800 % % % $0 2.Fringe Benefits Director & Co-director 27.4% $11,437 $6,200 $17,637 Graduate Assistant 6.6% $422 $422 $844 3.Consultant Fees Visiting Faculty 6*$2,000/each $12,000 $12,000 Virtual Training 1*$250 $250 $250 4.Travel 6 Visiting Faculty -6 days Airfare, housing, meals $6,756 $6,756 Project Director: University of Florida 10/01/2018 through 09/30/2020 Project Grant Period: Budget Form OMB No 3136-0134 Expires 6/30/2018 Applicant Institution: Laurie Taylor

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2 Directors2 days; Gainesville, FL to Washington, DC Airfare, hotel, meals $2,344 $2,344 5. Supplies & Materials $0 6. Services $0 7. Other Costs 26 Participants6 days Airfare, housing, meals $29,276 $29,276 26 Participants-$400/each $10,400 $10,400 8. Total Direct Costs Per Year $110,374 $46,299 $0 $156,673 9. Total Indirect Costs 47.5%; Dept. of Health & Human Services; 07/01/16 Per Year $52,428 $21,992 $0 $74,420 10. Total Project Costs $231,093 11. Project Funding a. Requested from NEH $231,093 $0 $231,093 b. Cost Sharing $6,639 $0 $0 $0 $6,639 12. Total Project Funding$237,732 TOTAL REQUESTED FROM NEH: TOTAL COST SHARING: (Direct and Indirect costs for entire project) Other Federal Agencies: Project Income: Applicant's Contributions: Outright: Federal Matching Funds: Third-Party Contributions:

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida B udget N otes Salaries (NEH Request: $ 77 ,166) UF Personnel: This proposal seeks funding for the project director and co directors as follows: Project director, Lau rie Taylor, Ph.D. (9.5% FTE in Y ear 1: $9,437; plus 5% effort in Y ear 2: $ 5,116, totals $14,553 for two years); and co directors, Helene Huet, Ph.D. (9.5% FTE in Y ear 1: $ 6,150 ; plus 5% effort in Y ear 2 : $3,334, totals: $ 9,484 for two years ); Paul Ortiz, Ph.D. (9.5% FTE in Y ear 1: $ 13,218 ; plus 5% effort in Y ear 2: $7,165, totals $20,383 for two years); and, Leah Rosenberg, Ph.D. (9.5% FTE in Y ear 1: $ 12,934 ; plus 5% effort in Y ear 2: $7,012, totals $19,946 for two years). Effort percentages have been estimated to be considerably higher in Year 1 due to the bulk of grant activities occurring during that time. The director and co directors will plan and execute a one week in person session in Y ear 1, to be followed by five virtual sessions, with project co-directors coordinating sessions, working with participants via online discussions forums as needed, and curating the institutes set of open access digital humanities assignments, modules, and syllabi produced by participants. A graduate assistant ($20/hr X 40 hrs/week X 8 weeks in Y ear 1 and 2: totals $ 12,800) will assist the co directors in administering the program. The duties will include: creating the web presence for the Institute on the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) website; maintaining a database of applications; creating a database of participants; creating and monitoring a private email discussion list for participants; assisting in the set -up, recording, and dissemination of virtual sessions; coordinating the logistics of the in -person institute; and assisting in the work of reviewing and preparing the course materials for distribution as Open Educational Resources. Fringe Benefits (NEH Request: $ 18,481) The director and co directors are faculty members, and fringe is calculated at 27.4% For the graduate assistant, the fringe rate is 6.6 %. Salaries/Fringe (UF Cost Share: $ 4,501 ) UF Personnel: Those contributing cost share to the project include: Jessica Aberle, PhD, architecture librarian serving as digital humanist (1% in Year 1: $755 ; 1% in Year 2: $778, totals $1,533 for two years); Bess de Farber, MNM, grants manager serving as collaboration facilitator (1% in Year 1: $1,258); and, Margarita VargasBetancourt, Caribbean studies librarian serving as digital humanist and content expert (1% in Year 1: $842; plus 1% in Year 2: $867, totals $1,709 for two years ). Co nsultant Fees Visiting Faculty (NEH Request : $1 2,250) Vis iting faculty at the in -person Institute will be paid $2,000/week, as recommended by the grant guidelines. The one external faculty member for a virtual session will be paid $250/session, as the workload is day (2 hours to prepare the session, 2 hours to provide the session). The inperson sessions will occur in Year 1, and virtual sessions in Year 2. Travel to Washington, DC (NEH Reque st: $2,344) Travel costs for the two co -directors to travel to Washington, DC in Year 1 are estimated following state of Florida guidelines, which govern travel at UF. The rates set for Washington, DC are $250/night for lodging (2 nights) and $36/day for meals (2 days). Airfare at $600 is based on the average expected cost for each Travel for Visiting Faculty (NEH Request: $ 6,756) The expected travel cost per visiting faculty member (6 total) is as follows, and is set according to UF travel policies, while providing on-campus housing:

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Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities University of Florida L odging at UF: 6 nights @ $35/night (total each: $210) Meals at UF : 6 days @ $36 /day (total each: $2 16) Airfare to UF, and related t ra nsportation: $700 Other Costs Participants (NEH Request: $ 39,676) Funding is provided for 26 par ticipant stipends at an average of $1,514 to defray the costs of attending the Institutes in person and virtual sessions. The expected cost per out -of-town participant is as follows, and is set according to UF travel policies, while pro viding on-campus housing: Lodging at UF: 6 nights @ $35/night (total each: $210) Meals at UF : 6 days @ $36/day (total each: $204) Airfare to UF, and related t ra nsportation: $700 Stipend for virtual participation and module development in Year 2 : $400 T he total av erage of $1,526 per participant includes Year 1: $426 for lodging and meals, and airfare and transportation (expected average of $700/participant) for a total of $1,126 to cover all costs r elated to the in -person session. In Year 2, t he remaining $400 stipend will be dispersed to each participant when they will be participating in virtual sessions and developing an assignment or module that they will share. The stipend costs were estimated at an equivalent of 2 days for the virtual sessions at $125 /day, as recommended by the grant guidelines, and another 1.25 days for the development and sharing of an assignment or module. A irfare estimates reflect that a super -majority of participants will be from outside of Florida and outside of the southeast region, with participants expected from the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. This estimate is an average of the expected flight costs given flights from San Juan, Puerto Rico are offered from Orbitz.com at $585 before fees for travel as of May 2019, and does not in clude transport to the airport). Flights from Christianstead, US Virgin Islands are quoted from Orbitz.com at $726, again before fees or costs for transport to the airport. Estimated airfare from major airports within the US are lower; for example, from Los Angeles, California, flights alone are quoted from Orbitz.com at $537, again before fees or costs for transport to the airport Participants traveling from small, regional airports will be expected to experience higher costs. A irfare and related transportation costs for participants and visiting faculty is calculated in the same manner because of the need for a mix of expert -trainers from the Caribbean region and around the US. There is no cost listed for shuttle or ground transportation in Gainesville, because the campus is walkable. For travel to and from the airport, the estimated total transportation costs are projected to cover both airfare and transportation to/from the airport (average of $700 for each participant). Indirect Costs (NEH Request: $74,420) The indirect costs for this project are calculated at 47.5% according to the Federally Negotiated rate established by the US Department of Health & Human Services. This rate has been applied to the total direct project costs and NEH request ($110,374 in Year 1 and $46,299 in Year 2) of $156,673. Indirect Costs ( UF Cost Share : $2,138) Foregone indirect costs of 47.5% have been applied to the total cost share costs of $ 4,501 over two years.

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Course Outline and Institute Schedule Phase 1: Pre-i nstitute (March-May 2019): Required readings: Amy E. Earhart and Toniesha L. Taylor. Pedagogies of Race: Digital Humanities in the Age of Ferguson. Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Eds. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. 251-264: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/72 Roopika Risam. Navigating the Global Digita l Humanities: Insights from Black Feminism. Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Eds. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. 359-367: http://dhde bates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/2 Miriam Posner, Howd They Make That? 23 August 2013, http://miriamposner.com/blog/howdid-theymake that/ Other resources: Diasporic Literary Archives. Diaspor ic Literary Archives. http://www.diasporicarchives.com/ Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Partner Institutions. Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC). http://dloc.co m Schuyler Esprit and Create Caribbean. Create Caribbean. Dominica State College, Dominica, 2015: http://createcaribbean.org/ Kaiama Glover and Alex Gil, Eds. sx: archipelagos. Small Axe, 2016-. http://smallaxe.net/sxarchipelagos Tooling Up for Digital Humanities: Pedagogy Stanford University, http://toolingup.stanford.edu/?page_id=1211 Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities : Concepts, Models and Experiments Modern Language Association (2016), https://digitalpedagogy.mla.hcommons.org Johanna Drucker, Intro to Digital Humanities, UCLA, http://dh101.humanities.ucla.edu/ The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy https://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/ Hybrid Pedagogy http://www.digitalpedagogylab.com/hybridped/ Phase 2: In person Session ( May 20 -24, 2019) The Institutes primary goals are for participants to learn and adapt digital humanities tools and practices to the needs of their students and their own needs for teaching and inclusion in a digital humanities community of practice. The inperson week will thus mirror the same steps taken in developing Open Educational Resources for local implementation and for sharing with effectiv e integration in other courses. The sessions each day will ground technologies with use cases in Caribbean Studies, present existing Caribbean DH resources and communities, and engage participants in hands-on work with technologies, digital pedagogy, DH, a nd Caribbean Studies teaching practices. May 20 | Day 1: Welcome, Teac hing with Digital Repositories, and Metadata Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza Gonzlez, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini ; with Bess de Farber, Crystal Felima, Melissa Jerome Topics & Skills: Overv iew of key methods, issues, and concepts for utilizing resources from and collaborating with Caribbean Studies Repositories (including dLOC, The Diaspora Project Dutch Caribbean Digital Platform, National Digital Newspaper Program, and Umbral) Teaching metadata as a boundary concept across teaching faculty, libraries, and archives for utilizing materials in teaching, using collections as part of teaching and class production,

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identifying limit ations to the field and research questions from gaps in collections, and developing competencies in metadata for enabling next step, advanced research Reading: Alex Gil and lika Ortega. Global Outlooks in Digital Humanities : Multilingual Practices and Minimal Computing. Doing Digital Humanities. Eds. Richard Lane, Raymond Siemens, and Constance Crompton. London/NY: Routledge, 2016. 22-34. Leah Rosenberg. Refashioning Caribbean Literary Pedagogy in the Digital Age. Caribbean Quarterly (62:3 -4), 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00086495.2016.1260282 Schedule for May 20 | Day 1: Welcome, Teaching with Digital Repositories, and M etadata 8:30 9:15am Welcome and overview of Institute (Co Directors) 9:15 11:15am CoLAB introductions (de Farber) 11:15 11:30am Break 11:30am 12:30pm Lecture & Discussion: Orientation to Caribbean Studies digital repositories for DH teaching ( Guest Faculty Felima, Jerome) 12:30 1:30pm Lunch 2 3pm Lecture & Workshop: Using, analyzing, and creating metadata to bridge collections, DH, and the classroom. Locating items in repositories with reference metadata to create sets in Excel based on location a nd time; spreadsheets to be used in workshops on day 2 (Huet, Taylor) 3 3:15pm Break 3:15 4:45pm Pedagogical Session Workshop: Review of syllabi or course descriptions from applications. What repositories connect based on content? With migration, mobili ty, and sustainability, where would timelines, maps, and oral histories expand on pedagogy in terms of questions and study within the course? ( Guest faculty and Co d irectors) May 21 | Day 2: Mobility & M ovement: Presenting & Visualizing DH Caribbean Studies Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza Gonzlez, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini; Jessica Aberle, Margarita Vargas Betancourt Topics & Skills: Organi zing and breaking down digital resources into granular data for presenting and visualizing with maps and timelines Creating basic data visualizations as timelines, story maps, and maps from spreadsheets Introducing data as concept and data materials in the classroom Readings: K. N. Ghisyawan. Introduction to Mapping (Slides and Notes). 2017, http://dloc.com/AA00061954/00001/downloads Erin Zavitz, Digital Humanities Teaching: Slave Narratives and Story Maps, 2016, https://ezavitz.wordpress.com/2016/12/05/digital-humanitiesteaching slave narratives-and-storymaps/ Margarita Vargas Betancourt, Finding the Silver Voice, Afro Antilleans in the Panama Canal Museum Collection at the University of Florida (Conference Paper), 2013, http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00003593/00001/downloads Schedule for May 21 | Day 2: Mobility & Movement; P resenting & Visualizing DH Caribbean Studies

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8:30 10am Discussion & Workshop: StoryMapJS for location and time, with structured data and repository materials ( Taylor ) 10 10:15am Break 10:15 12pm Discussion & Workshop: Google Maps for locations, with structured data and repository materials (Huet) 12 1pm Lunch 1 3pm Discussion & Workshop: TimelineJS for locations, with structured data and repository materials (Taylor) 3 3:15pm Break 3:15 5pm Pedagogical Session Discussion & Hands On: Into the Archives, hands on with an unprocessed, analog collection for considering the value, impact, and opportunities with digital tools and the digital humanities; DH metadata assignments in the classroom to tell stories of analog materials, and to place materials in context ; discussion about what happens when materials are d igitized in terms of the object, for what gets lost and what changes (f or example if you think about a photograph: the image becomes the focus, not the original con text, the method of product ion, slide, color photography, albumen, ca rbon print, cyanotype, etc. ) (Vargas Betancourt, Guest Faculty Co d irectors) May 22 | Day 3: Stories of Mi gration; DH Teaching with Oral Histories Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza Gonzlez, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini; with Sharon Austin and Mary Risner Topics & Skills: Overvi ew of key methods, issues, and concepts for oral history collections and materials in the DH classroom Navigating oral history tool options in the classroom Readings: Dutch Caribbean D igital Platform : http://dcdp.uoc.cw/ Panama and the Canal Oral History Project: http://dloc.com/ohpcm Haitian Art Digital Archive ( oral histories ) http://dloc.com/lacchada Ramble Bahamas, http://www.ramblebahamas.org/ Kelly Delancy, Joint Research Design and Community Collaboration (Chapter 4, pages 70-73), History to Heritage (2015) http://dloc.com/UFE0049684/00001 Johanna Drucker, Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display, Digital Humanities Quarterly 5.1 (2011), http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/1/000091/000091.html Schedule for May 22 | Day 3: Stories of Migration; DH Teaching with Oral Histories 8:30 10am Lecture and Discussion: The Diaspora Project (Gonzlez, Rios Villarini) 10 10:30am Break, and walk to the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program offices with production studio and archives 10:30 12:30pm Pedagogical Session Discussion & Hands On: I nto the Archives for an oral history program and archives; hands-on with processed and unprocessed analog and borndigital collections; discussion of DH oral history teaching and assignments in the classroom to share individual voices and community stories and to place materials in context (Austin, Ortiz Gonzlez, Groenewoud, Rios Villarini ) 12:30 1:30pm Lunch

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1:30 3pm Pedagogical Session: Finding and using oral histories, audio recordings and audiobooks (Risner, Co -directors) giving voice (Gonzlez, Rios Villarini) and playlist pedagogy ( Groenewoud) 3 3:15pm Break 3:15 5pm Workshop: Creating an assignment utilizing oral histories held in digital repositories, explaining connection to themes (migration, mobility, and sustainability), and specific course(s) for the assignment (Guest Faculty Co directors) May 23 | Day 4: Sustainabi lity; Platforms for Framing the DH Classroom Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza Gonzlez, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin Nadjah Rios Villarini ; with Jessica Aberle Topics & Skills: Scaff olding DH training in the classroom for eventual public presentation as digital/public humanities Finding, evaluating, and using platforms for digital humanities projects and teaching Reading: Am ardeep Singh. C laude McKay's Early Poetry (1911 -1922), https://scalar.lehigh.edu/mckay/index Haley Di Pressi, Stephanie Gorman, et al., A Student Collaborators Bill of Rights, UCLA Digital Humanitie s http://www.cdh.ucla.edu/news-events/a-student-collaboratorsbill-ofrights/ Erna Brodber. Oral Hi story and the Other Perspective. Caribbean Quarterly, (2013, 59:1; 20 30): https://doi.org/10.1080/00086495.2013.11672467 Shamin Renwick. "Caribbean Digital Library Initiatives in the Twenty first Century: the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC)" Al exandria 22.1 (April 2011): 1-18 http://dloc.com/AA00010694/00001 Schedule for May 23 | Day 4: Sustainability; Platforms for Framing the DH Classroom 8:30 10:30am Pedagogical Session: Privacy, Intellectua l Property, and Credit in Classroom DH (Co d irectors) 10:30 10:45am Break 10:45 12:30pm Discussion: Repositories and platforms for course production ( Asencio, Esprit, Gonzlez, Groenewoud, McCollin, Rios Villarini Co d irectors) 12:30 1:30pm Lunch 1:30 3pm Workshop: Making a course website as a Scalar book, integrating digital re pository materials (Aberle, Co d irectors) 3 3:15pm Break 3:15 5pm Workshop: Embedding Google Maps, TimelineJS, and StoryMapJS in Scalar (Aberle, Huet Taylor ) May 24 | Day 5: Sustainab ility; Teaching, DH, & Fostering Community Practices Guest Faculty: Schuyler Esprit, Debbie McCollin, Mirerza Gonzlez, Margo Groenewoud, and Nadjah Rios Villarini Topics & Skills: Implem enting these skills, tools, and methods in the classroom Designing the DH course materials, for implementation in Phase 4

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Readings: Bethany Nowvis kie. On Capacity and Care. 2015. http://nowviskie.org/2015/oncapacity -andcare/ Schuyler Esprit and Create Caribbean. Create Caribbean. Dominica State College, Dominica, 2015: http://createcaribbean.org/ Humanities Indicators. https://w ww.humanitiesindicators.org/ Memo, Digital Humanities Graduate Certificate, 2015, http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00032330/00001 Black Digital Humanities Projects and Resources, https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rZwucjyAAR7QiEZl238_hhRPXo5UKXt2_KCrwPZkiQ/edit Schedule for May 24 | Day 5: Sustainability; Pedagogy, DH, & Fostering Community 8:30 10am Discu ssion: Designing, scoping, and scaffolding a classroom DH assignment for use in individual courses, shared for other courses, and colla borative courses (Guest Faculty, Co d irectors) 10 10:15am Break 10:15 11:45pm Pedagogical Session: Evaluating and grading a digital humanities assignment; discussion of student assignments and projects with dLOC (Asencio), Create Caribbean (Esprit), Digital History (McCollin), Social Justice and History in the Dutch Caribbean (Groenewoud), and Diaspora Project ( Gonzlez and Rios ) 11:45am 12:45pm Lunch 12:45 3:15pm Workshop: Participants work on DH and Caribbean Studies course materials, including identifying plans for evaluation 3:15 3:30pm Break 3:30 4:30pm Discussion: Wr apping up, considerations for invigorating the humanities with the digital humanities within and across our institutions; opportunities for collaborative engagement within and beyond single institutions, contributing to shared resources to grow the communi ty of practice Phase 3: Virtual Sess ions and Asynchronous Communication, July December 2019: Virtual sessions on specific technologies, practices, and ongoing asynchronous communication: July 2019 | Pedagogical Practice for Teaching with Scalar o Led by Jessica Aberle, Hlne Huet, Mary Risner, and Laurie Taylor University of Florida August 2019 | Playlist Pedagogy for DH Teaching and Production with Oral Histories o Led by Margo Groenewoud, Assistant Professor, University of Curaao September 2019 | Story MapJS in Haitian Studies, Disaster Studies, and Digital Humanities in the Undergraduate Classroom o Led by Crystal Felima, Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation, UF October 2019 | Into the Archives: Engaging Classes in the Archives with Metadata o Led by Margarita Vargas Betancourt, Caribbean Collections Archivist, UF November 2019 | Enhancing Our Communities of Practice: Intentional and Generous SocioTechnical Supports o Led by Leah Rosenberg, UF and dLOC Scholarly Advisory Board CoChair Phase 4: Teaching Modu le Development for Teaching DH Locally, January-April 2020: Participants will, if course selection allows, implement their DH course materials in early 2020. Participants will self -select on this, where some may not be teaching during this time period or may not

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be teaching in a related ar ea. Those who teach during this semester will be asked to provide reflective writings on their teaching experiences for these materials. Those who do not teach the course materials developed from the Institute will be asked to provide a reflective assessment of their local resources and needs if they were to teach the course. This assessment will inform strategies for the community to collectively support individual needs for DH teaching related to Ca ribbean Studies and connecting across through the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability. During this phase, ongoing asynchronous communication will continue for the group as a whole through an email list. Phase 5: Publication and D isseminatio n, May-August 2020: The final phase will collect and build upon the activities and discussions to date, and the evaluations. The participants will also be asked to complete a qualitative survey reflecting on the development, highlighting strategies they us ed and the particularities of teaching digital humanities. During this final phase, participants will finalize the DH teaching materials that they developed and their reflective assessments. Participants will share the course materials for inclusion with the other teaching materials as Open Educational Resources in dLOC. The project Co-directors will collate and publish all of the materials in dLOC and will disseminate news of the new materials and white paper on various email lists, Twitter, and at onsite venues for dissemination and next steps. Further, t he project Co -directors will collaborate with Risner for dissemination of teaching materials to instructors in advanced secondary schools.

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Curriculum Vita JESSICA ABERLE Architecture Librarian Assistant University Librarian EDUCATION Dec. 2016 MSIS Sc hool of Information, The University of Texas at Austin May 2011 Ph.D. Architectural history, University of Virginia Dec. 2002 MPhil Medieval Archaeology, University of Glasgow May 2001 B.A. Art History & Archaeology, Classics University of Missouri EMPLOYMENT Architectu re Librarian, University of Florida, March 2017Present Graduate Research Assistant, Architecture and Planning Library University of Texas at Austin, Jan. 2017 Jan. 2015 Postdoctoral Fellowship in Academic Libraries, Council on Library and Information Resources Lehigh University, 20132011 CREATIVE WORKS & ACTIVITI ES EXHIBITS On Influence University of Texas Libraries, Fall 2016 The Secret History of Books Architecture and Planning Library, University of Texas at Austin, 2016 On the Road with Charles W. Moore: A Selection of Watercolors and Drawings from the Alexander Architectural Archives University of Texas at Austin, Summer 2015 LGBTQIA Month Exhibit Lehigh University, Fall 2012 [with Heather Simaneou] Being Medieval: An Exhibit Lehigh University Fall 2011 [with Lehigh Special Collections] DIGITAL PROJECTS Social Media Manager for Architecture and Fine Arts Library, University of Florida Co founded Digital Scholars in Practice Speaker Series, University of Texas Libraries Still Looking for You: Bethlehems Memory and Place Project [http://memories.lehigh.edu/ with Colin Foley, Julia Maserjian, an d Scott Rutzmoser] SELECTED PRESENTATIO NSPRESENTATIONS Special Collections Records as Big Data ARLIS Conference 2018, Session: A Value Proposition: Understanding Distinctive, Special, and Archival Collections Humanities PhDs at Work: Career Paths in Librarianship College of Liberal Arts and Sciences University of Florida 2017 (Invited Panel Member) Still Looking for You: Collaboration Between Faculty, Libraries, and Students AASL Conference 2016 Lightning Talk Jedburgh Abbey: A Case Study of King ship International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2012 Five Digital Tools Teaching and Learning Symposium 2012 Lehigh University

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An Expressio n of Kingship: The Art and Architecture of the Border Abbeys Friends of the Library Speaker Series 2011 Lehigh University (Invited) The Quest for Northumbria: The Border Landscape & David I Annual New England Medieval Studies Consortium Graduate Student Conference 2011 The Architectural Patronage of David I International Medieval Congress Leeds 2008 TOU RS Bethlehem Steel and Environs Tour MARAC Fall Conference Bethlehem, PA, October 2011 [with Julia Maserjian] WORKSHOPS Palladio THATCamp Gainesville 2017 Scalar THATCamp Gainesville 2017 CONTRACTS AND G RANTS EXTERNALLY FUNDED Co PI Opening St. Augustine: Preserving & Providing Access to 450 Years of American History (AWD01469), National Historical Publications Record Commission, $116,032 Consultant, Intersections: Animating Conversations with the Humanities Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, $4000,000 INTERNALLY FUNDED PI 50 Years of PI:N Digitizing the F. Blair Reeves Papers Smathers Libraries Strategic Opportunities Grant 2017, $4,958 SERVICECo -Convenor Digital Humanities Working Group, University of Florida, 2017Present THATCamp Gainesville Planning Committee, University of Florida, 2017 THATCamp News Planning Committee, University of Florida, 2018 Programming Committee, Association of Architecture School Librarians Conference, 2018 THATCamp Gainesville Planning Committee, University of Florida, 2017 Programming Committee, Association of Architecture School Librarians Conference, 2016 THATCamp ATX Pedagogy Planning Committee, University of Texas, 2015 THATCamp Lehigh Valley, Chair of Planning Committee, Lehigh University, 2013 -H ONORS Harold W Billings Staff Honors Award, University of Texas Libraries, Summer 2016 Student Travel Award, Association of Architecture School Librarians, 2016 Tradition of Excellency, Lehigh University, Spring 2013 Omicron Delta Kappa University of Virginia, 2005 Phi Beta Kappa University of Missouri, 2001 Victor Estevez Memorial Latin Prize, University of Missouri, 2001 Golden Key National Honor Society, University of Missouri Phi Eta Sigma, University of Missouri, 1998

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Miguel A. Asencio 2642 SW 152 Court Miami, Florida 33185 | 305 348 3008 | masencio@fiu.edu Education 2015Present Ph.D in Curriculum and Instruction: Learning Technologies Florida International University, Miami, Florida Expected graduation, Fall 2020 20122014 Master of Science in Cur riculum and Instruction: Learning Technologies Florida International University, Miami, Florida Graduated August 2014 20092012 Bachelor of Arts Florida International University, Miami, Florida Graduated April 2012 Experience Director, January 2016 Present Dig ital Library of the Caribbean, Florida International University, Miami, Florida Assesses partner needs and provides s olutions to facilitate ongoing submission, training and communication with current and new dLOC partners. Provide leadership and direction for the Academic Advisory Board and the Executive Board. Assist with the budget oversight and accountability reporting for dLOC Members. Negotiate nonexclusive distribution rights with distributors and/or publishers and trains publishers to submit original digital files directly to the digital library system for preservation and distribution. Develop and implement K12 and post secondary educational outreach programs and develop thematic collections designed to increase the use of the digital library for teaching and research. Work with University Library Administrative staff in developing a strategic plan for dLOC project s. Coordinate efforts with the University Auxiliary Budget Office in creating plans for future dLOC funding. Adjunct Faculty August 2015 Pr esent Education: EME 2040 Florida International University, Miami, Florida Develop and manage class syllabus and ensuri ng departmental standards are met. Plan and create lectures, in class discussions and assignments. Grade assigned projects, quizzes, and exams. Assess grades for students based on participation, performance in class, assignments and examinations. Collaborate with colleagues on course curriculum. Advise students on how to succeed in class and with projects. Stay updated on learning technologies and innovations in the classroom.

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Digital Imaging Specialist August 2012 January 2016 Florida International University, Miami, Florida Planned, designed, and managed digitization services for multimedia content. Co wrote $1.2 million in Tech Fee awarded grants. Supervised a team of technicians and staff on digitization projects. Managed projects and collaborated across multiple teams in creating digital content. Ensured quality control and environmental standards for production and facilities. Created digital assets for online instructional environments, preservation and archive. Instructed university faculty/staff, and students on digital capture technology solutions. Assisted faculty in developing multimedia content for webbased courses. Designed and programmed computer multimedia editing and storage servers. Photographer February 2010 August 2012 Florida International University, Miami, Florida Photographed commerci al assignments and created onlocation / studio lighting setups. Operated video camera(s) and assisted in video production shoots. Setup audio recording equipment for video production, lavalier and boom microphones. Coordinated pre and post production studio environments for multicamera setups. Performed post production tasks for multimedia projects utilizing professional software. Produced media for publication, distribution, webcasting, and video streaming project s. Technical Skills Learning Management Systems: Blackboard, Moodle Adobe: Creative Suite 6, Premiere Pro, InDesign, Illustrator Apple: Final Cut, Logic Pro, Motion, Compressor, Aperture Screen Capture: Camtasia, Adobe Captivate XRite Professional Color management and calibration. Digitization Software: Golden Thread, LimbServer, SilverFast, VueScan, Nikon Scan Knowledge of Serious Games, MMORPG, Simulations Basic Knowledge of Objective C, JAVA and HTML Curriculum research, rubrics, planning, writing, evaluation, organizing and management. Awards, Memberships, and Training Presidential Excellence Award, Florida International University, 2013. Member, Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). Leadership Advancement Training Program, Leadership Development Institute, FIU, 2014. Member, American Library Association (ALA), 2016Present Presidential Leadership Program Graduate, Florida International University, 2017 Service FIU Jr. Scholars K 12 Program, 2017Present Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce Education Committee, 2017Present Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries, 2016Present

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DR. SHARON D. WRIGHT AUSTIN UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 104 WALKER HALL GAINESVILLE, FL 32611 (352)273-3060 polssdw@ufl.edu Education: The University of Ten nessee at Knoxville Earned doctorate in political science in August 1993 Major areas of emphasis: American Government (Public Law; Congress, the Presidency, and the Judiciary, and Minority Politics) Minor areas of emphasis: Comparative Politics and Public Administration Dissertation: Aftermath of th e Voting Rights Act of 1965: Racial Voting Patterns in Memphis Mayoral Elections, 1967-1991 The University of Mem phis Earned masters degree in political science with a minor in education in December 1989 Christian Brothers U niversity Earned bachelors degree in history with a minor in political science in May 1987 Teaching: The University of Flo rida Director of the African American Studies Program July 2012Present Interim Director of the African American Studies Program August 2011-July 2012 Asso ciate Professor from August 2004Present Visiting Associate Professor from August 2001-August 2004. Received tenure in June 2007 The University of M ichigan at Ann Arbor Visiting Scholar of Political Science from August 2000 -May 2001 The University of M issouri at Columbia Associate Professor of Political Science and Black Studies from July 2000-August 2002 Assistant Professor of Political Science and Black Studies from August 1995-July 2000 The University of Lo uisville Assistant Profe ssor of Pan African Studies from August 1992-May 1995 Manuscripts : The Caribbeanization of B lack Politics: Group Consciousness and Political Participation in America (State University of Albany Press March 2018), 256 pages.

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Sharon D. Wright Austin. The Transformation of Plantation Politics in the Mississippi Delta: Black Politics, Concentrated Poverty, and Social Capital in the Mississippi Delta (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2006), 280 pages. Sharon D. Wright. R ace, Power, and Political Emergence in Memphis (New York: Routledge Press, 2000), 218 pages. Refereed Journal Art icles Published: Sharon D. Wright Aus tin, Sekou M. Franklin, and Angela K. Lewis. The Effects of Concentrated Poverty on Black and White Political Participat ion in the Southern Black Belt. National Political Science Review 15 (2013): 57-69. Sharon D. Wright Aus tin, Richard T. Middleton IV, and Rachel Yon. The Effect of Racial Group Consciousness on the Political Participation of African Americans and Black Pan -Ethnics in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Political Research Quarterly 65, 3 (September 2012): 629-641. Baodong Liu, Sharon D. Wright Austin, and Byron DAndra Orey. Church Attendance, Social Capital, and Black Voting Participation. Social Science Qu arterly 90, 3 (September 2009): 576592. Sharon D. Wright Aus tin and Richard T. Middleton IV. The Limitations of the Deracialization Concept in the 2001 Los Angeles Mayoral Election. Political Research Quarterly 57, 2 (June 2004): 283-293. Sharon D. Wright and R ichard T. Middleton IV. The 2001 Los Angeles Mayoral Election: Implications for Deracialization and Biracial Coalition Theories. Politics and Policy (formerly known as the Southeastern Political Review ) 29, 1 (2002): 692-707. Sharon D. Wright. T he Tennessee Caucus of Black State Legislators. The Journal of Black Studies 31, 1 (September 2000): 3-19. Sharon D. Wright. Pol itical Organization or Machine: The Impact of Harold E. Fords Endorsements in Memphis Mayoral Elections. National Political Science Review: The Journal of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists 7(Fall 1999): 210-220. Sharon D Wright Elect oral and Biracial Coalition : Possible Election Strategy for African American Candidates in Louisville Kentucky. The Journal of Black Studies 25, 6 (July 1995): 749-758. Numerous book chapt ers, book reviews, and service to the university and profession. References availab le upon request.

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Bess de Farber 2010 NW 36 Drive Gainesville, FL 32605 (352)273-2519, bdefarber@ufl.edu PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE ( Recent) University of Flo rida (UF) Libraries Research Administration Manager, Grants Manager (O ctober 2008 to present) Responsibilities include: all pre and post award activities related to grants projects for nine university libraries. Initiated grants management program for training and mentoring librarians and support staff in grant seeking, submission, and post award activities with emphasis on collaborative projects within UF and beyond. Manage all grant-related activities from idea -stage to project completion including developing budgets, project planning and strategies, interfacing with funders, grant writing, and researching funding opportunities. In fall 2009, established a student grants training program (820 students to date), for finding and preparing fellowship applications, with Graduate School and NSF-funded Innovation through Integrati on and Institutionalization (I3) program. Consistently working with Division of Sponsored Research and Contracts & Grants personnel for pre and post award management to ensure compliance with university/sponsors policies, setting up contracts and revising award budgets/project plans. ASK Associates Pri ncipal (May 1995 to present) Responsibilities vary according to contract, including: writing and managing grants programs, developing projects and collaborations; facilitating planning retreats; creating feasibility studies for new programs; advising executives and board members on management issues; networking with funders, troubleshooting within community to mend relationships, and training staff members to perform grants and other management functions. Client organizations have included: arts and culture, community development, healthcare, education, social service and philanthropic agencies. University of Ariz ona Libraries Grants & Revenue Manager (May 2005 to September 2008) Responsibilities included pre and post award grants management. Initiated grants seeking program for training and mentoring librarians and staff in grant seeking and post award activities with emphasis on collaborative projects. Managed all grant-related activities including develop ing budgets, project planning and strategies, interfacing with funders, writing, and researching. Consistently worked with Sponsored Projects Department, pre and post award, to ensure compliance with university/funders policies, setting up contracts and revising award budgets/project plans. Developed assessments and plans for revenue generating activities. All processes were carried out in a team -based organizational environment. Constantly provided facilitation services for collaborative projects, meetings and planning retreats. Served as adjunct instructor for the School of Information & Library Services for a graduate course in grantsmanship. EDUCATION/CERTIFICATIO NS 2003 Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL: Master of Nonprofit Management 1978 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA: Bachelor of Music in Clarinet Performance 1976 Rollins College, Winter Park, FL: Music and Environmental Studies 2007 Project Management, Bringham Young University 2003-present International Assoc iation of Facilitators: Certified Professional Facilitator

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INSTRUCTOR/WORKSHOP PRESENTER/FEATURED SPEAKER/FACILITATOR (Selected) 2018 University of Florida, CoLAB Idea Table Cafe: Animating Conversations with the Humanities @ UF 2018 University of Florida, Collaborating with Strangers on Teaching 2017/2018 University of Florida, Collaborating with Strangers on Intersections: Animating Conversations with the Humanities @ UF 2018 Florida State University, Collaborating with Strangers @ FSU 2017 Rollins College, Collaborating with Strangers @ Rollins 2017 State of Florida Division of Information Services, Collaborating with Strangers at the Public Library Directors Annual Meeting 2017 Association of College Book Artists, Collaborating with Strangers on Book Arts 2017 University of Florida, Collaborating with Strangers in Integrated Communications 2017 Florida Library Association Annual Conference: Highlights from Collaborative Grant-Seeking 2017 Association of Southeast Research Libraries, Collaborating with Strangers Webinar BOOKS 2017 Coauthored with Apri l Hines and Barbara Hood: Collaborating with Strangers: Facilitating Workshops in Libraries, Classrooms, and Nonprofits (American Library Association Editions) 2016 Collaborative Grant-Seeking: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield) AWARDS (selected) 2018 Supe rior Achievement Award: University of Florida, Division 3 2017 Innovation Award: Northeast Florida Library & Information Network GRANTS (selected) 2017 PI, Procter & Gamble Higher Education Program Grant, Collaborating with Strangers: Broadening Impact through Florida Academic Libraries ($8,033) 2016 PI U niversity o f Florida George A Smathers L ibraries, Collaborative G rant-Seeking i n Libraries a nd Museums I nternship ($2,400) 2014 Co-Investigator and Co-Author, National E ndowment f or the H umanities, Repositioning Floridas J udaica Library: Increasi ng Access t o Humanities R esources f rom F lorida, Latin America and the Caribbean Communities ($500,000) 2014 Co-P I, Procter & G amble Higher Education Program G rant, Collaborating with Strangers In and Outside Mas s Com mu nications ($4,292) 2013 Co-PI, University of Florida, George A Smathers L ibraries, A Performing Arts Approac h t o Collection Development ($3,769) 2012 Co-Investi gator and Lead Author: Institute of Museum & Library Services, The Panama Canal -Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement ($485,375) 2012 Co-Investigator: National Endowment for the Humanities, French Pamphl iet Planning Project: An Internal Collaboration for Improvement of Collection Access ($38,246) 2011, 2012 Co-PI. University of Florida Catalyst Fund: Collaborating with Strangers Workshops ($12,962; $4,981) 2007 Co-PI. University of Arizona: Coral Way Ele mentary School Oral History Project on Bilingualism in Education partnership with UA College of Education, UA Libraries, and Historical Museum of South Florida. ($10,000) PUBLIC SERVICE APPOIN TMENTS (Selected) 2006 Technology Research Innovation Fund (TRIF) Arizona State review panelist 2004 The Childrens Trust (Dade): Advocacy & Outreach Grants review panelist

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SCHUYLER K. ESPRIT, PhD. Dominica State Colle ge Stockfarm Campus P.O. Box 2066, Roseau Commonwealth of Dominica schuyler.esprit@dsc.edu.dm (767)275-7042 171 South Leopold Drive Wallho use Commonwealth of Dominica schuyleresprit@gmail.com http://createcaribbean.org http://schuyleresprit.com (767)225-8998 CURRENT POSITION Registrar and Dean of Academic Affairs, Dominica State College, Roseau, Dominica, August 2016Present OTHER RELEVANT POSITION S Founding Director and Principal Investigator, Create Caribbean Inc., Research Institute at Dominica State College, Roseau, Dominica, 2014Present Editorial Consultant and Columnist, The Chronicle, Chronicle Media Group Incorporated, Roseau, Dominica, 2015Present PREVIOUS ACADEMIC POSITIO NS Director, Institutional Research and Academic Instruction, Dominica State College, Roseau, Dominica, 20152016 Lecturer in English and History, Dominica State College, Roseau, Dominica, 2014present Assistant Professor of Engli sh, Trinity Washington University, Washington DC, 20112013 EDUCATION Ph.D. English L anguage and Literature, University of Maryland College Park, 2011 M.A. English Language and Literature, University of Virginia, 2006 B.A. English Language and Literatu re, Brooklyn College, 2004 PROFESSIONAL COMPETEN CIES Research Methods| Higher Education Curriculum Development| Information Systems Management| Research and Development Coordination| Grant Writing and Administrative Fundraising| Study Abroad and Student Exchange Coordination| Campus Communications and Public Relations| IT Management and Web Development| Institutional Research and Strategic Planning| Library and Learning Resource Management| Faculty Professional Development and Training| Self -Study and Accreditation Preparation| Transcript and Records Evaluation AREAS OF RESEARCH AND TEACHING E XP ERIENCE Postcolonial literature and theory| Caribbean literary and cultural studies| Digital Humanities| African American and African Diaspora literature| Reading &Reception Studies| Critical Theory| Caribbean &Postcolonial Archive Studies| Archival Management| Academic Writing| Critical Reading BOOK MANUSCRIPT IN PROGRES S West Indian Readers: A Social History, Forthcoming. PUBLICATIONS Heterotopias of Resistance: Caribbean Narratives in Digital Spaces. In The Digital Black Atla ntic. Eds. Roopika Risam and Kelly Baker Josephs. Debates in the Digital Humanities Series. University of Minnesota Press. (Forthcoming)

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Teaching Edwidge Danticat s Krik? Krak! Through Global Learning Classrooms. Co -authored with Anita Baksh. In Approaches to Teaching the Work of Edwidge Danticat. Eds. Celucien L. Joseph, Suschismita Banerjee, Marvin Hobson, and Danny Hoey. (Forthcoming) Introduction. The Orch id House (1953) by Phyllis Shand Allfrey. London and Dominica: Papillote Press: April 2016. Caribbean Litera ry Studies in The Encyclopedia of Postcolonial Studies. Eds. Sangeeta Ray and Henry Schwarz. London: Wiley, February 2016. CONFERENCES, WORK SHOPS, AND PRESENTATIONS Invited Keynote Speaker. ADHO Digital Humanities Conference. Mexico City Mexico. June 2018 Invited Keynote S peaker. Global Digital Humanities Symposium. Michigan State University. March 2018 Create Caribbea n: Taking the Digital beyond Displacement. Invited Panelist. The Caribbean Digital IV: A Small Axe Event, Universit y of Virginia. December 2017. Ecologies and Institutions: Rebuilding a Shapeshifting Caribbean with Digital Humanities. Invited Lecture. University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies. November 2017 Topography, Topology, T ypography: The Library as Place, Text and Tool in Caribbean Digital Research Classrooms Association of Caribbean University and Research Institutions and Libraries (ACURIL) Conference. San Juan, Puerto Rico. June 2017 Organizer and Lead P resenter. Professional Development Week for Managers, Faculty and Administrative Staff. Dominica State College, Roseau, Dominica, January 2017. Innovating resear ch and heritage on small islands: Dominica s model for Preservation and Education Caribbean Digital III, Barnard College, New York, December 2016. Creole Language Culture and the Literary Marketplace. Congr s des Ecrivains de la Caraibe. Le Gosier, Guadeloupe, June 2015. Nature Island Li terary Festival: Successes and Challenges. Congr s des Ecrivains de la Caraibe. Le Gosier, Guadeloupe, June 2015. Introduction to Debat ing. Debaters Workshop, Kiwanis Club Annual National High School Debates, December 2013, December 2014. Participant. THATCamp Caribe. Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. November 2012 SELECTED TEACHING E XPERIENCE Lecturer, Dominica State College, 2014Present ; courses include: LIT121: West Indian Literature, ENG222: Advanced Writing COLL225: Research and Service Learning Internship Colloquium (designed for Create Caribbean), HIS 115: Digital Humanities Research, ENGL 111: Language and Communication, ENGL 122: Writing Seminar, BNUR 319: Research Methods for Nursing Professions Assistant Professor, English Program, Trinity Washington University, 20112013 (Instructor, 2010-2011) SELECTED PROFESSI ONAL EXPERIENCE Editor, The Chronicle, Roseau, Dominica, 2014-2016 Contributing Writer, The Analyst Magazine ( www.analystmagazine.com ), St. Lucia, 2012-2013

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CRYSTAL ANDREA FELIMA, PH.D. University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries 555 Library West PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 Email: felima@ufl.edu Website: crystalfelima.com Cell: 864 3786370 Office: 352 2730173 EDUCATION Ph.D. in Anthrop ology University of Florida (2017) Graduate Certificates: Latin American Studies, Disaster and Emergency Management MPS in Africana Studies Cornell University (2010) BA in African American Studies, Minor in Political Science, University of South Carolina (2008) Languages: Haitian C reole ( intermediate ) CURRENT APPOINTMENT Adjunct Lecturer, UF Language and Literatures Program. Course HAT 3564: Haitian Culture and Society. Crosslisted in African American Studies, Latin American Studies, and Anthropology. (Spring 2018) 2017-2019 Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation at UF George A Smathers Libraries Affiliate Faculty of the UF Center for Latin American Studies UNIVERSITY TEACHING Univ ersity of Florida HAT 3564: Haitian Culture and Society (spring 2018) AFA 2000: Introduction to African American Studies ANT 2410: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ANT 3930: Anthropology of Disasters ANT 3241: Anthropology of Religion ANT 2301: Human Sexuality and Culture (teaching assistant) PUBLICATIONS Felim a, Crystal Andrea. 2016. Economics in Vodou: Haitian Women, Entrepreneurship, and Agency. In Vodou in Haitian Memory: The Idea and Representation of Vodou in Haitian Imagination., edited by Celucien Joseph and Nixon S. Cleophat, 179 -189. Lanham, MD: Lexington. Felima, Crystal An drea. 2013. African American Haitian Blan : Negotiating Identity through Fieldwork Experiences in Northern Haiti. Anthropology N ews. 54 (1 -2) : 13-14. Felima, Crystal An drea. 2009. Haitis Disproportionate Casualties after Environmental Disasters. Journal of Haitian Studies 15 (1): 6-28. WORK EXPERIENCE Fello w Inaugural Haitis Future Leaders Fellowship Program. Placed at the Ministry of Haitians Living Abroad in Port au -Prince, Haiti. Sponsored by the E mbassy of Haiti, Washington, DC ( Summer 2014) Founding Teacher K IPP Bly theville College Preparator y School, Blytheville, AR (2010-11) Courses Taught: English Language Arts, Social Studies, and Phonics

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SELECTED CONFERENCE ACTIVITY Digital Humanities and Social Justice Pedagogy in Haitian Studies. 43rd Annual Caribbean Studies Association. Havana, Cuba. Summer 2018. (paper under review) Teaching beyond H aitian Exceptionalism: Digital Decolonization and Social Justice Pedagogy in Caribbean Studies . Panel: Social Justice, Data Curation, and Latin American & Caribbean Studies. 2018 Digital Humanities Conference. Mexico City, Mexico. Summer 2018. Invited Panelis t for the University of North Floridas International Studies and Digital Humanities Symposium: Intersections between International Studies and Digital Humanities. Jacksonville, Florida. Spring 2018. Invited Guest P resenter for ANG6930 (2A65): Foundations for a Career in Anthropology, University of Florida. Presentation on Library Resources and Databases. Spring 2018. African American Hai tian Blan : Negotiating Self and Identity in Haiti . Panel: Diaspora Women in the Field: Negotiating Identity, Herstory, and Citizenship. 29th Annual Haitian Studies Association Conference. New Orleans, LA. Fall 2017. Panel Moderat or for Session: Digital Humanities and the Historiography of Caribbean Studies. Symposium : Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean. UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Gainesville, Fl. Fall 2017. ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH EXPERI ENCES 2017 National Science Foundation CAREER Grant # 1455142, Assessing Long-Term Sociocultural Impacts in Disaster Recovery Efforts. PI: Mark Schuller, Northern Illinois University. Participation in eightweek qualitative multisited research study in southern Ha iti. 2017 Participation in the PhD Course Disaster Social W ork: Resilience and Crisis Management in the Context of Welfare S tates . Hosted by the University of Iceland, Reykjavk, Iceland. 2015 Participated in Summer Institute for Dis aster and Risk Research (SIDRR). Hosted by Beijing Normal University Beijing, China. Received $800 travel award from Beijing Normal University and $250 from my department to attend institute. SELECTED FELLOWS HIPS, AWARDS AND HONORS 2017 Code4Lib Diversity Scholarship Award ($1300) 2017 Delores Auzenne Dissertation Award ($6000) 2016 Graduate Summer Travel Award ($5000 to conduct doctoral research in CapHaitien) 2014 National Security Education Program (NSEP) Boren Fellowship to Hait i ($26,900) 2013 Academic Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowship in Haitian Creole MEMBERSHIPS Ame rican Anthropological Association | Association of Black Anthropologists | Caribbean Studies Association | Gainesville Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated | Haitian Studies Association (Graduate Student Board Member, 2009 -2010) | Society for Cultural Anthropology

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Mirerza Gonzlez Vlez, Ph.D. email: mirerza.gonzalez1@upr.edu Work Experience July 2017 to present Associate Dean of the College of Humanities UPR RP 2014June 2017 Assistant Dean of Students College of Humanities UPR RP 2011 June 2014 Professor and Chair, Department of English, College of Humanities UPR RP 2009 2010 Associated Professor and Coordinator: Periodic Review Report, Middle States Commission on Higher Education, Commissioned by Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Sonia Balet, UPRRP 2002to present Assistant Professor, English Department, College of the Humanities UPR RP Mass Communication, Journalism, Organizational Communication, Communication Studies, Media Studies 19931998 Sub Editor Corporate Media, Special Projects Newspaper El Vocero de Puerto Rico 19921993 Media Relations Press Liaison, Organizing Committee 17thCentral American and Carib bean Games, Ponce 1993 19901992 Journalist, Dilogo Newspaper Education Ph.D. Mas s Communication and Journalism University of Iowa, 2002 M.A. Journalism Theory UPRRP, 1998 B.A. Mass Communication and Journalism UPRRP, 1989 Publications Gil, Neme sio and Gonzlez Vlez, Mirerza (forthcoming chapter) Gazing the Ugly Truth : The Poetics of beauty in the film El Cimarrn. In Celluloid Chains: Slavery in the Americas through Film, University of Tennessee Press. Gonzlez Vlez, M. (April, 2014) Mapping Points of Origin: The Foundational Narrative of the Puerto Rican Pioneer F amily in the Virgin Islands, Revista UMBRAL. http://umbral.uprrp.edu/sites/default/files/3.pdf Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, Nadjah. (2013) "Floating Migrations, Education and Globalization in the US Caribbean." In D. Blum & C. Ullman (Eds.), The Globalization and Corporatization of Education: The Limits and Liminality of the Market Mantra. New York: Routledge. Anthology of the special issue, Globalization and Education, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 25(4) Gonzlez Vl ez, M. & Ros Villarini, Nadjah. "Floating Migrations, Education and Globalization in the US Caribbean." March 2012, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 25(4) Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, N. (2012). Oral Histories of Bilingual Education Teachers from the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix: exploring ideological tensions inside and outside the classroom. Revista Sargasso. University of Puerto Rico GUEST EDITORS: Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Rios Villarini, N. (2012). The Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix. Revista Sargasso. Gonzlez Vlez, M, La Torre, E., and Rivera, C. H. (2011) Teachers Manual : Virtual Curricular Unit Access to Success: English. Commissioned by UPR. Gonzlez Vlez, M, La Torre, E., Ros Villarini, N., Rivera, C. H (2010) Virtual Curricular Unit Access to Success: English. Commissioned by UPR.. Gonzlez Vlez, M (2009) Alianzas, tensiones y contradicciones en la vida social de migrantes puertorriqueos en Santa Cruz, Islas Vrgenes Americanas: tres experiencias

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de vida. Voices. E zine, Centro Estudios Puertorriqueos. http://centropr.hunter.cuny.edu/voices/enlos barrios/st croix/tres experi encias Gonzlez Vlez, M., (2008). Competencias comunicativas: Saber, Hacer, y Saberhacer. En Memorias: Seminario para maestros San Juan, PR: Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades. Pp. Gonzlez Vlez, M., & Ros Villarini, N. (2008). Memorias: Seminario para maestros San Juan, PR: Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades. Gonzlez Vlez, M., Ros Villarini, N., & Santiago Villafae, R. (2008). La migracin puertorriquea a Santa Cruz: una mirada desde la competencia comunicativa. [Computer I nstructional Design and Manual]. University of Puerto Rico, Ro Piedras Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades. Gonzlez Vlez, M. (2007). [Review of the Book Turning Out Blackness: Race and Nation in the History of Puerto Rican Television]. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 31 (3), 286289. Gonzlez Vlez, M. (2005). The Islands In Between: Exploring Eastern Caribbean Cultures Introduction to Caribe Anglfono. Revista La Torre X (36 37), vii viii Gonzlez Vlez, M. (2004, March 25). Dilemas de las cadenas hispanas en P.R.: el caso de Univisin. Claridad En Rojo, p.27 Singer, J. & GonzlezVlez, M. (2003). Envisioning the Caucus Community: Newspapers Consider Their On Line Role in the Kickoff to Campaign 2000. Journal of Political Communication, 20, 433 452 GonzlezVlez, M. (2002). Articulating Latinidad: The Social Imaginary in a Latino Newspaper. Dissertation (Proquest # AAT3058404) GonzlezVlez, M. (2002). Assessing the Conceptual Use of Social Imagination in Media Research. Journal of Communication Inquiry 26 (4), 349 353. GUEST EDITOR: Gonzlez Vlez, M. (2002). Special Issue: Social Imagination and Media. Journal of Communication Inquiry 26 (4). GonzlezVlez, M. (2000). Consumos y encuentros en la Plaza del Mercado de la Parada 19 de San turce: Una reflexin etnogrfica de las prcticas de ocio en la ciudad de San Juan. Revista Mayutica, 7, http://home.coqui.net/ fuser/RM98.html(username:mirob/ password: gurabo) Institutional a nd External Funds The main researchers of the Diaspora Project /Proyecto Dispora have been awarded several research grants for approximately $100,000 which include institutional and external funds. I have directed the following funded projects: a.200709: Director : Seed fund ingFIPI, Funds of Knowledge among Puerto Ricans Migrants in Saint Croix, Virgin Islands ($40,000) b.200809: Director Puerto Rican Diaspora Research Grant Hunter College CUNY ($4,000) c.2009 10: Director Seminario para Maestros, Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades ($6,000) d.201112: Director Taller para Maestros Vieques : Octubre Mes de las Humanidades, Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades ($4,000) e.Summer 2014 : iINAS Research Grant ($2,000) f.Fall 2017 2019: Co PI Caribbean Diaspora: Panorama of Carnival Practices a stage one project under the NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant ($42,000) g.Fall 2017 2019 : Institutional seed fundingFondo Institucional para la Investigacin (FIPI), support the development of stage two propos al on digital humanities ($16,000) h.Fall 2017 2019: Director: Archivo Histrico de Culebra/ Culebra Island Historical Archive Puerto Rican Endowment for the Humanities / Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades ($6,000)

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MARGO GROENEWOUD PHD University of Curaao Dr. Moises da Costa Gomez, Curaao, Dutch West Indies m.groenewoud@uoc.cw / margo.groenewoud@gmail.com PROFESSIONAL UNIVERSITY OF CURA AO DR. MOISES DA COSTA GOMEZ Assistant professor (O,5 fte) Faculty of Social and B ehavioral Sciences J ul y 2017 now Project Manager UCRI Research Institute (0,5 fte) July 2017 now Manager Library and Research Services January 2008 June 2017 NICIS INSTITUTE, THE HAGUE 2005 2008 Program Leader Social Domain INDEPENDENT CONSULTA NT 2003 2005 LOGICA LTD. (NOW : CGI) 1997 2003 R e sourc e manager (2002 -2003) Delivery manager (200 1-2002), Management consultant (1997 -2001) EDUCATION LEIDEN UNIVERSITY AND UNIVE RSTY OF CURA AO 2011 2017 PhD in H umanities (Caribbean history) LEIDEN UNIVERSITY 1987 1994 MA in Humanities (Caribbean h istory ) KINGS COLLEGE, UNIV ERSITY OF LONDON 1993 1994 Research Scholarship ( London a n d Oxford)

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MEMBERSHIPS Executive Committee: Association of Caribbean Historians (2016 2018) Executive Council: Assoc iation of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries ACURIL (2013 2016) PAPERS AND PUBLICATION S (SELECTION) Groenewoud, Margo. Decolonization, global citizenship and the character of higher education in the Dutch Caribbean F orthcoming paper and proceeding s article for the 20th Annual Eastern Caribbean Island Cultures I slands in Between Conference on the Languages, Literatures and Cultures of the Eastern Caribbean, 2018 - Reconsidering Neglect and Erasure of the Dutch Caribbean in Caribbean Historiography . F orthcoming, paper for conference of the Asso ciation of Caribbean Historians, June 2018 -Nou koest, nou kalm. D e ontwikkeling van de Curaaose samenleving, 1915 1973: van koloniaal en kerkelijk gezag naar zelfbestuur en burgerschap PhD thesis, University of Leiden and University of Curaao, 2017 Miembro di progreso? Armoedeval en sociale steun op Curaao, 1950 Sociaalcultureel Tijdschrift XVII, nr. 4 (2016): 5 13. -.And children you remain : democracy and belonging in 20th century Curaao society . Paper presented, conference of the Association of Caribbean Historians Havana, Cuba, 6 9 juni 2016. -. Digitalisering: een veelzijdige impuls voor onderwijs en onderzoek Sociaalcultureel Tijdschrift XVI, nr. 3 (2015): 15 19 - Van missieschool naar burgerschool? De kwestie van de gelijkstelling van het onderwijs op Curaao, 1919 1935 . OSO Tijdschrift voor Surinamistiek en het Caribisch Gebied 34, nr. 1+2 (2015): 103 115. -The Dutch Caribbean Digital Platform: how building a cultural heritage platform can improve education and research in a small island developing state. Paper presented to the Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL) Conference, Suriname June 2015. -Powe r and Influence of the Catholic Church on Curaao Society in the 1960s and 1970s: a new perspective. Paper presented to the 2012 conference of the Association of Caribbean Historians. Curaao. -The Catholic Church in Modern (Post) Colonial Curaao: As pects of Power Relations in Comparative Perspective. In: Creole Connections: Transgressing Neocolonial Boundaries in the Languages, Literature and Cultures of the ABC Islands and the Rest of the Dutch Caribbean, red. Nicholas Faraclas, 57 69. Curaao/Puerto Rico, 2014. -Power and Influence of the Catholic Church on Curaao Society in the 1960s and 1970s: a new perspective. Paper presented to the 2012 conference of the Association of Caribbean Historians. Curaao, mei 2012.

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HLNE HUET European Studies Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries The University of Florida 5 41 Library West Gainesville, FL 32611 h huet@ufl.edu 814 3215166 @superHH helenehuet.org mappingdecadence. org EDUCATION THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, University Park, PA Ph.D French and Francophone Studies ( May 2015) M.A. French and Francophone Studies (May 2010) UNIVERSITE LILLE 3, Lille, France Matrise Langues et Littratures trangres, Anglais ( May 2006) License, Langues et Littratures trangres, Anglais ( May 2004) EMPLOYMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, Gainesville, FL ( Aug. 2015 Present) Assistant University Librarian, European Studies THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY ( Aug. 2013 July 2015) Digital Scholarship Services Graduate Assistant THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY ( Aug. 2008 Aug. 2013) Course Instructor SELECTED PUBLICATIONS ARTICLES Hines, A., Huet, H., Ewing S., & Freund, L. Team Up: Collaborating with Public Relations Students to Promote Library Subject Specialists. College & Research Libraries News 78.9 (October 2017): 506509. http://crl n.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/16776 Huet, H. Mapping Decade nce: From a Hunch to a Website. Journal of Map & Geography Libraries: Advance in Geospatial Information Collections & Archives 11.1 (May 2015): 80 90. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15420353.2015.1008618

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BOOK REVIEWS Huet, H. The Force of Beauty: Transforming French Ideas of Femininity in the Third Republic Holly Grout. In Contemporary French Civilization 42.2 (2017): 22931. https://doi.org/10.3828/cfc.2017.14 Huet, H. Aesthe tic Tracts: Innovation in Late Nineteenth Century Book Design, Ellen Mazur Thomson. In Nineteenth Century Studies, Online Reviews, The New (2017). http://english.selu.edu/ncs/TheNew.php#AestheticTracts RECENT PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES Case Studies a nd Business Plan Development Workshop on Strategies for Creating a Program for Paid Student Internships/Assistantships in the Digital Humanities. Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory 2017 Conference, Orlando, FL, Nov. 2017. Building Space for DH Communities. Digital Humanities 2017, Montral, Canada, Aug. 2017. Digital Methods for Teaching and Researching in French Studies. Chair of Panel. Roundtable: Digital Humanities in French and Francophone Studies. Organizer and Chair. Society for French Historical Studies 63rd Annual Conference, Washington, DC, April 2017. Team Up: Collaborating with Public Relations Students to Promote Library Subject Specialists. Poster. The Association of College and Research Libraries, Baltimore, MD, March 2017. Children of Decadence: The Forgotten Childrens Literature of Rmy de Gourmont. Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing Annual Conference (Languages of the Book), Paris, France. July 2016. Becoming Decadent: Critics, Lifestyle, and the Making of a Literary Movement. Society for French Historical Studies, Nashville, TN. March 2016. AWARDS AND GRANTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA George A. Smat hers Libraries Digital Scholarship at UF Workshop (2017), $4,907. George A. Smathers Libraries Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) Graduate Internship (2017), $1,800. Center for European Studies Faculty Travel Award (2016), $2,500.

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EDUCATION M.S. Information, Florida State University August 2019 M.S. Pharmacy, University of Florida May 2015 Concentration in Forensic DNA & Serology B.A. Criminology, University of Florida December 2011 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL o Project Coordinator, Florida & Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project October 2013 Present o Overnight Shift Circulation Supervisor August 2012 October 2013 o Overnight Shift Circulation Assistant December 2011 August 2012 SERVICE & MEMBERSHIPS George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL o Smathers Libraries Middle Manager Community, Co-convener December 2017-present o Committee on Strategic Digital Directions, Member December 2015-present o Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) UF Team, Member January 2016-present o Reference Desk staff January 2014-present o Ask A Librarian staff January 2014-present Project Management Institute (P MI ), Member March 2017-present GRANTS & AWARDS National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), National Digital Newspaper Project (2013pr esent). Project Coordinator. $923,000 award for the Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project. Full grant proposals and additional information at: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00019344/ http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00028169/ and http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00009659/ INVITED TALKS The Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project: Accessing Historical Newspapers Melissa Jerome Historical Advisory Committee Networking Conference, Port Charlotte, FL, May 2017. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Digitizing Historical Caribbean Newspapers: the Florida and Puerto R Patrick Reakes, Margarita Vargas-Betancourt, and Melissa Jerome. Proceedings of the Association of Caribbean Historians (ACH) 2016 Conference SELECTED PRESENTATIONS Best Practices for Project Management & Collaboration University of Florida Digital Scholarship Workshop. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.., February 2018. Chronicling America: Open Access Digital Newspapers Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC) 207 Conference. University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL., November 2017. University of Florida | George A. Smathers Libraries P.O. Box 117000 | Gainesville, FL 32611 352 273 2637 | mmespino@ufl.edu

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Studying the Eugenics Movement from 1880s-1922 History Seminar course. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, September 2017. Promoting Use of Digital Historical Newspapers: Outreach Strategies of the FPRDNP National Digital Newspaper Program 2017 Annual Awardee Conference. Washington, D.C., September 2017. May Mann Jennings & Creation of Royal Palm State Park Humanities and the Sunshine State: Teaching Humanities. Gainesville, FL, June 2017. Using Newspapers for Research: The Panama Canal Tomahawk Creek Middle School, Midlothian, VA, April 2017. Using the FPRDNP for Online Newspaper Research Northeast Florida Library Information Network (NEFLIN) Media Specialists Interest Group. Gainesville, FL, October 2016. The Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project Melissa Florida Library Webinars (FLW). Webinar, September 2016. The FPRDNP: Behind the Scenes American Library Association (ALA) 2016 Annual Conference, Associate for L Digitizing Historical Caribbean Newspapers : The Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project Melissa Jerome and Patrick Reakes. Association for Caribbean Historians 2016 Annual Conference. Havana, Cuba, June 2016. Expanding Access to Historical Content: the National Digital Newspaper Program and Chronicling America. Alachua County Library District. Gainesville, FL, November 2015. Expanding Access to Historical News Digitizing Newspapers: a Brief Look at the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP). Society of Heritage Archives Desmantelando Fronteras/Breaking Down Borders. Webinar Series, September 2015.

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en-GB en-GB CURRICULUM VITAE en-GB QUALIFICATIONS: Certificate in University Teaching and Learning The University of the West Indies: St. Augustine, Trinidad 2013 2014 Ph.D, History (high commendation ) The Uni versity of the West Indies: St. Augustine, Trinidad 2006 2010 Commonwealth Split Site Scholar The University of Manchester: Manchester, U nited K ingdom 2007 2008 MPhil, History The University of the West Indies: St. Augustine, Trinidad 2003 upgraded 2006 BA, History, Psychology (cum laude) Hood College: Frederick, M aryland, United States 1999 2003 en-GB EXPERIENCE: Lecturer, History The UWI St. Augustine T rinidad May 2012 present C o u r s e s : D i g i t a l H i s t o r y ; F o u n d a t i o n s o f M o d e r n M e d i c i n e ; T o p i c s i n t h e H i s t o r y o f T r i n i d a d a n d T o b a g o 1 7 8 3 1 8 9 8 a n d 1 9 8 9 p r e s e n t S e m e s t e r 1 a n d 2 en-US Assistant Lecturer, History The UWI, St. Augustine, Trinidad Sept 2010 May 2012 en-US Part-time Lecturer, History The UWI, St. Augustine, Trinidad May July 2010 en-US Lecturer, History The University of the Southern Caribbean, T dad Jan May 2010 en-US RECENT PUBLICATIONS en-US Karen E. Eccles and Debbie McCollin, eds., World War II and the Caribbean (Mona, Jamaica: UWI Press, 2017) en-US McCollin, D. ed., In the Fires of Hope: Essays on the Modern History of Trinidad and Tobago 1962 -2016 Vol 2 (Kingston, Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers, 2016) en-US McCollin, D., st Indies during World in K. Eccles and D. McCollin, eds., World War II and the Caribbean (manuscript gone to press, UWI Press, 2017) 60 Agate Drive, (868)637 9293 (h) Diamond Vale, ( 8 6 8 ) 790 0171 (c ) Diego Martin. debbie.mccollin@gmail.com debbie.mccollin@sta.uwi.edu Debbie Mc Collin PhD ____________ __________

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2 en-US McCollin, D. In the Fires of Hope: Essays on the Modern History of Trinidad and Tobago 1962-2016 Vol 2 (Kingston Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers, 2016): 238-260. en-US McCollin, D. in Chris Bonfield, ed., Hospitals and Communities 1100 1960 (New York and Oxford: Peter Lang, 2013) 265-290. en-US McCollin, D. Trinidad and Tobago 1938in J. De Barros, D.Wright, eds. Health and Medicine in the Circum-Caribbean 1800-1968 (Hampshire: Routledge, 2009) 227248 en-US CONFERENCES: en-US The Allied Effort: World War II and Public Health in the British West Indies en-US (Oct 2015) 2 nd Luso-Brazilian Meeting on the History of Tropical Medicine: New University of Lisbon, Portugal en-US The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1954 and the Rise of the Trinidad Regional Virus Laboratory en-US (July 2015) Workshop on Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean: Casa de Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janiero, Brazil en-US A Culture of Cooperation: The West Indian Inter-Colonial Tuberculosis Conference of 1913 en-US (May 2015) Association of Caribbean Historians, 47 th Annual Conference: Bahamas en-US : The Development of Tuberculosis Treatment in Trinidad and Tobago 19011962 (July 2014) Public Health in The Caribbean and Latin America Conference: The University of York, UK en-US Health and Decolonisation in Trinidad and Tobago en-US (September 2012) In The Fires of Hope: 50 Years of Independence in Trinidad and Tobago Conference: The Department of History, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad en-US In Pursuit of Disease: A Biography of The Trinidad Regional Virus Laboratory 195361 (May 2012) Association of Caribbean Historians, 44th Annual Conference: Curaao en-US WORKSHOPS en-US Cool Tools in Education Workshop en-US Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning Technology Lab (November 2017) en-US THAT Camp CaribeDigital Humanities Conference en-US University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico (November 2012) en-US Record KeepingNational Archives Week en-US The National Archives of Trinidad and Tobago (November 2012)

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Abbreviated Curriculum Vita: Paul Andrew Ort z Director, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Associate Professor, Department of History 245 Pugh Hall 210 Keene Fl int Hall P.O. Box 115215 University of Florida P.O. Box 117320 University of Florida Gainesville, Florida, 32611 352-392-7168 http://www.history.ufl.edu/oral/ Gainesville, Florida 32611 (352)392-6927 (Fax) portiz@ufl.edu Past President, Ora l History Association, 2014-2015 BOOKS : An African American and Latinx History of the United Stat es. ReVisioning American History Series. (Boston: Beacon Press, 2018). Emancipation Betrayed: T he Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920. American Crossroads Series, George Gund Foundation imprint in African American Studies (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005). Reme mbering Jim Crow: A frican Americans Tell About Life In The Segregated South. Co editor with: William H. Chafe, Raymond Gavins, Robert Korstad, et. al. (New York: New Press, 2001). (Paperback edition published 2003.) (Third edition published in 2008) (Fourth edition published in 2014). FORTHCOMING: Oral History and Community-Based Interviewing and Education: Oral History in Our Hands (Palgrave Macmillan, under contract). Behind the Veil: Afri can Americans in the Age of Segregation, 1895-1965 with William H. Chafe SELECTED PEER REVIEWED ESSAYS: Anti Imperialism as a Way of Life: Emancipatory Internationalism and the Black Radical Tradition in the Americas, for: The Futures of Black Radicalism (Verso: London, 2017), eds. Gaye Theresa Johnson and Alex Lubin 133-147. Essay, Making History Mat ter: Teaching Comparative African American and Latina/o Histories in an Age of Neoliberal Crisis, for: Kalfou: A Journal of Comparative and Relational Ethnic Studies Vol. 3, Issue 1 (Spring 2016), 125-146. (With Derrick White) Introduction to C.L.R. James on Oliver Coxs Caste, Class, and Race, and (with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program) annotated lecture transcript of: C.L.R. James, The Class Basis of the Race Question in the United States : A lecture presented at the Institute of the Black World June 16, 1971, New Politics : A Journal of Socialist Thought, XV, No. 4 (Winter 2016), 43-60. Chapter, Washington, T oussaint, and Bolvar, The Glorious Advocates of Liberty: Black Internationalism and Reima gining Emancipation, in: Rethinking American Emancipation: Legacies of Slavery and the Quest for Black Freedom (Cambridge Press, 2015), eds. William A. Link and James J. Broomall, 187-215. Tearing Up the Masters Nar rative: Stetson Kennedy and Oral Hist ory, Oral History Review (Summer/Fall 2014), 41 (2): 279-289. Book Chapter, The Not So Strange Career of William Watson Daviss Civil War and Reconstruction in Florida, in: The Dunning School: Historians, Race, and the Meaning of Reconstruction, ed. John David Smith

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and J. Vincent Lowery. Foreword by Eric Foner. (University of Kentucky Press, 2013), 255-280. Si, Se Puede! Revisite d: Latina/o Workers in the United States, in Social Work Practice with Latinos Eds., Richard Furman & Nalini Negi (Lyc eum Books, 2010), 45-66. SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORS : The Mort Wolfson Faculty Service Award for Advising and Teaching, Division of Student Affairs, University of Florida, October, 2017. Havens Center for S ocial Justice Visiting Scholar, University of Wisconsin-Madison, November, 2016. Elizabeth B. Mason Award Oral History Association. On behalf of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, October 17, 2015. Diversity Award for the Samuel Proctor Oral History Programs relentless pursuit of community knowledge, local voices, and academic transformation has created a monumental program that has impacted the lives of countless people in Florida and across the nation. Society of American Archivists, May, 2015. Stetson Kennedy Vox P opuli Award for the Sam uel Proctor Oral History Programs outstanding achievement in using oral history to create a more humane and just world, Oral History Association. 2013. The Csar E. Chv ez Action and Commitment Award, for Outstanding leadership through engaging in activities which dignify workers and by making notable contributions to the labor movement & demonstrating resilience in organizing workers, especially those who have been traditionally disadvantaged. Florida Education Association, AFL-CIO, October 11, 2013. Harry T. and Harriett V. Moore Book Prize, 2006, Florida Historical Society and the Florida Institute of Technology for Emancipation Betrayed. Lillian Smith Book Award, 2002, Southern Regional Council for Remembering Jim Crow : African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South (With William H. Chafe, et. al.) Selected Media Interviews/Appearances: Interviewed for What It Means to Be a Citizen: Student Veterans in History Classrooms, Perspectives on History, the American Historical Associat ion, January, 2017. Expert Consultant a nd Interviewed for: Bias on the Bench, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, http://projects.heraldtribune.com/bias/sentencing/ December 7, 2016 Interviewed for Remembering the Battle of Negro Fort 200 Years Later, Fusion.net, July 27, 2016. http://fusion.net/story/330065/battle-ofnegro fort anniversary/ Interviewed for : Leg acy of Bloody Election Day Lingers in Florida Town, The Undefeated.com, 11/4/16, https://theundefeated.com/features/legacy -of-bloodyelection -daylin gers in -ocoee-florida/ Interviewed for Movimiento Supremacista Ku Klux Klan Sigue Vigente en EUA, NOTIMEX: Agencia De Noticias Del Estado Mexicano, www.notimex.com.mx July 30, 2014. , (Interview on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington), Hong Kong Daily Apple, August 25, 2013. Interviewed for the British Broadcasting Companys Last Word program on the life of Patricia Stephens Due. This aired on February 10, 2012.

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Nadjah Ros Villarini Col l ege of General Studies | Universidad de Puerto Rico, Ro Piedras | P.O. Box 23323 San Juan, Puerto Rico 009312765 | Nadjah.rios@upr.edu Education University of Austin, Linguistic Anthropology Ph.D., 2004 University of Texas, Austi n, Linguistic Anthropology M.A. 2002 University of Puerto Rico, Ro Piedras, Spanish Department B.A. 1995 Professional Experience 20112012, Chair, Graduate Program in Linguistics, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus 20082009, English Coordina tor, Centro de Competencias Lingsticas, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus 2008to present Assistant Professor English Department College of General Studies 2008, Coeditor, Working Papers in Linguistics 20062008, Academic Coordinator, Ce rtificado de Lingstica Aplicada al Espaol como Lengua Materna, Programa Graduado de Lingstica, University of Puerto Rico, Ro Piedras Publications Ros Villarini, N. (2017) Ritmos que unen Islas: calipso y drones entre Puerto Rico e Islas Vrgenes Ame ricanas Revista Umbral Ros Villarini, N. (2015). Desde Trinidad a Vieques via Islas Vrgenes: Breves apuntes sobre la historia del calipso y las bandas de acero en la isla municipio. Revista Cruce. Ros Villarini, N. (2014). Vieques, manos arriba. Cort ometrajeDocumental.Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, Nadjah. (2013) "Floating Migrations, Education and Globalization in the US Caribbean." In D. Blum & C. Ullman (Eds.), The Globalization and Corporatization of Education: The Limits and Liminality of the Market Mantra. New York: Routledge. Anthology of the special issue, Globalization and Education, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 25(4) Gonzlez Vlez, M. y Ros Villarini, N. (2012). Floating migration, education, and globalization in the U S C aribbean. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education 25:4, 471486Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Rios Villarini, N. (2012). The Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix. Revista Sargasso. Ros Villarini, N., & Castro, E. M. (2011). Mig racin entre V i eques y Santa Cruz: Una oportunidad para el desarrollo de una visin geogrfica pancaribea. Cuadernos de Educacin. Ros Villarini, N. (2008). Ideologas en torno al Programa de Educacin Bilinge en Santa Cruz. Seminario para Maes tros sobre la Dispora Puertorriquea en Santa Cruz, San Juan, P.R. Gonzlez Vlez, M., & Ros Villarini, N. (2008). Memorias: Seminario para maestros San Juan, PR: Fundacin Pue rtorriquea de las Humanidades. Gonzlez Vlez, M., Ros Villarini, N., & San tiago Villafae, R. (2008). La migracin puertorriquea a Santa Cruz: una mirada desde la competencia comunicativa. [Computer Instructional Design and Manual]. University of Puerto Rico, Ro PiedrasFundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades. Gonzlez V lez, M. & Ros Villarini, N. (2008). Oral Histories of Bilingual Education Teachers from the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix: exploring ideological tensions inside and outside the classroom Manuscript in press for publication at Sargasso a Journal for Caribbean Literature Language and Culture Ros Villarini, N. (2010 ). De Puertorriqueo a Papa Them: entrevista con un puertorriqueo en Santa Cruz. Centro Voices. Presentations and Conferences Ros Villarini, N. (2010, April) Cultura, lengua y expres in: Relaciones entre Vieques y Santa Cruz. Inter Acciones Creativas, Proyectos Culturales y Comunitarios. Centro de Estudios Avanzados, Puerto Rico: Maestra en Gestin Cultural y Programa de Estudios Interdisciplinarios. Ros Villarini, N. (2012, March) Conference: La historia de Vieques en el desarrollo escolar. Simposio de microhistoria Universidad interamericana, Metrop olitan Campus. Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, N. (2010, January). The Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix. 25th Annual conference of the Society of the Virgin Islands Historians. Salt River

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National Park and Ecological Preserve. Ros Villarini, N. (2 010). Cultura, lengua y expresin: Relaciones entre Vieques y Santa Cruz. Centro de Estudios Avanzados. Ros Villarini, N. (2009, October). Avalo estudiantil. Profesor Julio Rodrguez, Paneles sobre el aprendizaje estudiantil. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Univesidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Ro Piedras: Oficina para la evaluacin del aprendizaje estudiantil. Ros Villarini, N. (2009). Competencia comunicativa: Teora y Prctica. Congreso de lengua y literatura. Universidad del Turabo: Editorial SM. Ros Villarini, N. (2008, October ). Ideologas en torno al Programa de Educacin Bilinge en Santa Cruz, Islas Vrgenes Americana. Seminario para Maestros sobre la Dispora Puertorriquea en Santa Cruz, San Juan, P.R. Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, N. (2008, October ). Oral Histories of Bilingual Education Teachers from the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix: exploring ideological tensions inside and outside the classroom Puerto Rican Studies Association Conference, San Juan, P.R. Ros Villarini, N. (2007, May). Performing Langauge Ideologies Encuentro Internacional de Pensamiento y Educacin, Aruba. Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ro s Villarini, N. (2006, December 2). Exploring the Development of a Research Project: Funds of Knowledge among the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix Speech Communication Association of Puerto Rico Annual Conference. San Juan, P.R. Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ro s Villarini, N. (2006, November 3). Theorizing Funds of Knowledge among the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix Artculo presentado en el Nine Eastern Caribbean Conference. Kingston, St. Vincent. Ros Villarini, N. (2006, May). Prcticas Diarias en el Saln de Clase Encuentro de Educacin y Pensamiento, Ponce, P.R. Ros Villarini, N. (2006, Octubre). Entre Dos Aguas: Polticas Lingsticas en Puerto Rico. Asociacin de Estudios Latinoamericanos (LASA), San Juan, P.R. Ros Villarini, N. (2006, Sept ember ). Polticas Lingsticas en Puerto Rico. Tercera Conferencia sobre Educacin, Trabajo y Emancipacin, Universidad de Texas, El Paso y Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez Gonzlez Vlez, M. & Ros Villarini, N. (2006, March ). Funds of Knowledge among Hispanics in St. Croix Artculo presentado en The Islands in Between Annual Conference, St. Vincent Grants : C aribbean Diasporas: Panorama of Caribbean Carnival Practices, National Endowment of the Humanities: $40,000, December, 2017, appproved proposal Archivo Digital Comunitario, Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Huma nidades, $3,000.00. Octubre 2017. Approved proposal Certificado de Posgrado en Lingstica Aplicada al Espaol, Programa Graduado de Lingstica, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Ro Piedras. Departamento de Educacin. Ttulo IIA. $206, 877.00, April 18, 2012, approved proposal. Memoria, relatos y testimonios de la dispora caribea. Iniciativas de Investigacin y Actividad Creativas Subgraduada. Ttulo V Subgraduado. $13,000.00, October 20, 2011, approved proposal. Integrando las humanidades al currculo escolar Fundacin Puertorriquea de las Humanidades. For two semin ars: Vieques and Culebra, Each $6,800.00 for a total of $13,600.00, September 23, 2011, approved proposal These seminars are intended to provide educational experiences rela ted to Vieques cultural experiences It aims to promote informed discussion and develop culturally sensitive curricula that promote communication in English and Spanish as well as local history through the use of technologies innovative Voices: Puerto Ricans in St. Croix. Fuente: Varios: $2,000.00, approved proposal. http://centropr.hunter.cuny.edu/voices/en los barrios/stcroix Funds of Knowledge among the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix. Fondo Institucional para la Investigacin (FIPI), Universida d de Puerto Rico, Decanato de Estudios Graduados. $21,000.00, 20072009, approved proposal. Seed grand to collect demographic information and to develop a cultural profile of the Puerto Rican diaspora in St. Croix, USVI.Oral accounts of bilingual Education Teachers of the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix: exploring the usefulness of cultural capital in the classrooms The Puerto Rican Diaspora Grant, Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueos, CUNY. $4,000, 2007, approved, collected oral histories of teachers who are Puerto Rican or from Puerto Rican descent, and developed a website under the identity of The Diaspora Project, www.thediasporaproject.org as a resource center related to the Puerto Rican Diaspora in St. Croix. USVI.

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en-US MARY E. RISNER. Ed.D. en-US @langforcareers en-US Associate Director of Outreach en-US Center for Latin American Studies University of Florida en-US EDUCATION Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Technology). en-US University of Florida. 2011 Master of Arts in Latin American Studies University of Florida. 2001 Master of Arts in Spanish. Bowling Green State University. 1995 Bachelor of Business Administration. Marketing/Latin American Studies. Stetson University. 1987 en-US SELECT GRANTS Longview Foundation. Global Classroom Initiative. 2015. Co-PI with Swapna Kumar. ($15,000) Fulbright Hays Group Project Abroad. Andean HATSS Project. 2008. Co-PI with Carmen Diana Deere. ($66,574) Florida Humanities Council. Film and Speaker Series: Florida Caribbean Migration. 2008-09. Co -PI with Carmen Diana Deere. ($12,460) Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education ( FIPSE). U.S. Brazil: International Business Management 2002-2006. Project Director. ($200,724) en-US SELECT PUBLICATIONS en-US Risner, M. & Egsquiza, C. (2016). Preparing Students for the Global Workplace: The Relevance of Languages for Specific Purposes. In special issue: Focus on Intercultural Competence. Dimension.en-US Risner, M. & Kumar, S. (2015). Graduate Student Perceptions of a Globally Networked Course. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education.en-US Reflections on an Online Doctorate in Educational Technology. Tech Trends 58 (4), 73-80. Risner, M. (2012). The Study of Portuguese and Brazilian Culture in the Business Context. I n Luna, M. (Ed.) Ensino de portugu s nos Estado Unidos: hist ria, desenvolvimento, perspectivas en-US Risner, M. (2011). A C ommunity of Practice of B usine ss and Foreign Language Faculty. In Watson, M. and Perez Llantada, C. (Eds.). Specialized Languages in the Global Village. en-US Risner, M. (20 10). Integrating Latin American Studies and Technology through a Blended Professional Development Model. In C. Crawford et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2010 (pp. 3685-3688). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. en-US Kelm, O. & Risner, M. (2007). Brazilians Working with Americans. Austin: University of Texas Press. en-US SELECT PRESE NTATIONS Global Connections in a Pre-Service Teacher Education Course (Co-presenter) Annual Online Global Education Conference. November 2015 Empowering Educators and Increasing Impact through Professional Learning Networks International Foreign Language Education Title Washington, D.C. March 2015

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Creating a Globally Connected Classroom. National Business Education Association Annual Conference (NBEA). Atlanta, GA. April 2013 Connecting Multiple Campuses around the Globe: Graduate Student Perspectives. Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) Conference. New York, New York. April 2013 Integrating Latin American Studies into the Spanish Curriculum. (Panel). American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. D.C. July 2011 Integrating Latin American Studies and Technology across the Curriculum: A Professional Development Model. National Council for Social Studies. Denver, CO. November 2010. Take Latin America and the Caribbean into Your Classroom! (Co presenter). Florida Council for the Social Studies September 2009. Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Fulbright Hays Project: Integrating Technology and Authentic Materials in the Classroom (Copresenter). Southeast Association on Language Learning Technology/Southeast Conference on Language Teaching (SEALLT/SCOLT). Atlanta, GA. March 2009. New Technologies and New Horizons in Foreign Language. Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) Annual Conference. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. June 2004. en-US COURSES TAUGHT en-US Retailing in Brazil Blended course: Online/Study Abroaden-US Social Media Ecologies Online en-US Cross-cultural Communication for TeachersOnlineen-US First Year Florida Instructoren-US Business Portuguese-Foreign Language across the Curriculum .en-US Beginning Portuguese I and IIen-US Introduction to Latin American Studiesen-US Spanish I and II en-US SELECT SERVICE Journal of Languages for Specific Purposes (JLSP). Editorial Board 2013-present Online Network of Business Language Educators. Director and Founder 2009-present Online Portuguese Language Journal. Founder-2006 Florida Teacher Certification Exam Development Team (Spanish). 2003-2004 FIPSE-Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education. Peer Grant Reviewer. 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009 Florida Teacher Certification Exam. Spanish scorer 2002-2008 Florida Foreign Language Association. Current past-president. Board Member, 2005-2009 American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. Executive Board as Portuguese Representative, 2015-2018 Latin American Studies Association. Member, 2004present

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Leah Reade Rosen berg Department of English, P.O. Box 117310 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7310 Tel: (352) 294-2848, Fax: (352) 392-0860, rosenber@ufl.edu Professiona l Appointments Associate Professor of English, University of Florida, 2008Assistant Professor of English, University of Florida, 2001 Assistant Professor of English, Grinnell College, Fall 1999-2001 Education PhD, C omparative Literature. Cornell University, January 2000. MFA, Fiction. Brooklyn College, June 1991. BA, Class ics. The Johns Hopkins University, June 1986. Teaching and R esearch Interests Caribbean Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Atlantic Studies, Digital Humanities Books Beyond Windrus h: Rethinking Postwar Anglophone Caribbean Literature co edited with J. Dillo n Brown. ( Universi ty of Mississippi Press, 2015; paperback June, 2017.) Nationalism and the Formation of Caribbean Literature (Palgrave October 2007) Digital Hum anities Projects (Selected) Collabora ting Across the Divide: Digital Humanities and Caribbean Studies symposium (Fall 2017) Intercollegiate collaborative hybrid courses and digital humanities projects: Migration and Mobility with Evelyn OCallaghan, University of the West Indies (Fall 20 17) Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Reimagining Diasporas, Archives and the Humanities (Fall 2013 and Spring 2016) with Rhonda Cobham-Sander, Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of Black Studies and English, Amherst College; and Donette Francis, Associate prof essor of English, University of Miami. http://dloc.com/digital/panamasilver Journal Articles Peer refereed (Selected) Refashioning Caribbean Literary Pedagogy in the Digital Age . Caribbean Quarterly 62:3-4 (2017), pp. 422-444. Diaspora Thr ough Tourist Eyes. Social and Economic Studies 64:3-4 (2016), pp. 1-32. It's Enough t o make any Woman Catch the next Plane to Barbados: Constructing the Postwar West Indies as Paradise. Third Text : Critical Perspectives on Contemporary Art and Culture 28:4-5(2014), 361-376. http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/8f4wIRNqUMsuvir246rj/full

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The N ew Woman and The Dusky Strand: The Place of Feminism and Womens Literature in Early Jamaican Nationalism. Feminist Review 95.1(July 2010):45-63. Touris m and the Birth of Jamaican Literature. Jamaica Journal 32.3 (Feb 2010): 46-51. Modern Roma nces: The Short Stories of Una Marson s Cosmopolitan (1928-1931). The Caribbean Short Story. Special Issue of The Journal of West Indian Literature 12.1-2 (November 2004): 170-183. Caribbea n Models for Modernism in the work of Claude McKay and Jean Rhys. Modernism/Modernity 11:2 (April 2004), 219-238. Una Mars ons Pocomania (1938): Class, Gender, and the Pitfalls of Cultural Nationalism. Essays in Theatre Studies. 20:1 (2004), 27-42. The Rope, of course being covered with flowers: Metropolitan Discourses and the Construction of Creole Identity in Jean Rhyss Black Exercise Book The Jean Rhys Review : 11:1 (Autumn 1999):5-34. Mother and C ountry: Exile as the Common Ground between Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea and After Leaving Mr. McKenzie. MaComre: the Journal of the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars 1(1998):161-69. Current Pro jec t: Contested Possessions: Tourism and the Representation of Caribbean Folk Culture (Book manuscript) Awards and G rants (Selected) Excellence Award for Teaching, the Digital Library of the Caribbean, 2013 Excellence Award for Digital Humanities, the Digital Library of the Caribbean, 2011. National Hum anities Center Fellow, 2010-2011. National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Seminar 2006, Revolution and the Making of Identities : France and Haiti, 1787-1804. Professio nal Service (Selected) Reader, National Humanities Center & ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships Member Scholars Advisory Board, the Digital Library of the Caribbean 2008-2015 Article Reviewer ( Anthurium Blackwell Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature, Feminist Review MaComre PMLA, Small Axe Caribbean Quarterly ) Book Reviewer (P algrave, University Presses of Illinois Virginia and Mississippi) Graduate Coordinator, Department of English, Fall 2015English Department Associate Graduate Coordinator and Placement Officer, Fall 2012 -2015 Deans Committee on the World Literature and Introductio n to Literature course, 2013-2014 Latin American Studies Faculty Advisory Council, 2011-2013 University Libraries Committee, 2007 -2010, chair 2009/10

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LAURIE N. TAYLOR, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian, Scholarly Resources & Services George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 352.273.2902 | Laurien@ufl.edu | www.laurientaylor.org | @laurien CURRENT POSITIO N Digital Scholarship Librarian ( Tenured University Librarian ) Smathers Libraries Editorin Chief and Unit Head, LibraryPress@UF Graduate Faculty, Art and Art History Affiliate Faculty, Center for Latin American Studies Affiliate University Librarian, Center for Gender, Sexualities, and Womens Studies Research SUMMARY Leads de velopment for socio -technical (e.g., people, policies, communities, technologies) aspects of scholarly cyberinfrastructure to support a culture of transformative collaboration that values and supports diversity and inclusivity for digital and public scholarship, or scholarship that produces broadly accessible research results D esign s and teaches forcredit classes on the Digital Humanitie s. Mentors graduate students and faculty. L eads digital scholarship initiatives, including projects with the UF Digital Collections (UFDC, www.ufdc.ufl.edu ), Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC, www.dloc.com ), and digital collections and scholarship projects hosted at UF. L ead s initiatives to support digital scholarl y publishing, including as founding Editorin Chief of the LibraryPress@UF, a joint imprint of the UF Press and the Libraries PRIOR POSITI ONS 2011 2013 Digital Humanities Librarian UF 2008 2011 Interim Director, Digital Library Cente r, UF 2007 2008 Digital Projects Librarian, Digital Library Center, UF PUBLICATIONS, PRESENTATIONS, AND GRANTS Peer reviewed publications include monographs, an edited collection, 18 chapters in edited collections and 18 journal articles. Presentations include 35 international presentations and workshops, with 9 invited. PI, Co -PI, and Investigator for internal and external grants totaling over $3 million; focused on creating and leveraging digital collections for digital and public humanities. Selected Publi cations: Laurie N. Taylor, Meredith Morris Babb, Chelsea Dinsmore, and Brian W. Keith. Libraries, Presses, and Publishing: ARL SPEC Kit 357. Washington, DC: Associ ation of Research Libraries 2017. http://publications.arl.org/Libraries Presses -PublishingSPEC Kit -357/

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Brian W. Keith, Bonnie J. Smith, and Laurie N. T aylor. Building a Collaborative Digital Archive and a Community of Practice. portal: Libraries and the Academy 17.2 (2017: 419434): https://muse.jhu.edu/article/653214 Laurie N. Taylor, Margarita Var gas -Betancourt, and Brooke Wooldridge. The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC): Creating a Shared Research Foundation, Scholarly and Research Communication 4.3 (Dec. 2013: 7 pp.): http://src online.ca/src/index.php/src/article/view/114/246 Laurie N. Taylor, Poushali Bhadury, Elizabeth Dale, Randi GillSadler, Brian W. Keith, Prea Persaud, and Leah R. Rosenberg. "Engaging the Digital Humanities with Graduate Internships in Libraries for Transformative Collaboration." Digital Humanities, Libraries and Partnerships Eds. Kate Joranson and Robin Kear. Chandos Publishing, 2018. Laurie N. Taylor, Suzan Alteri, Val (Davis) Minson, Ben Walker, Haven Hawley, Chelsea Dinsmore, and Rebe cca Jefferson. Library Collaborative Networks Forging Scholarly Cyberinfrastructure and Radical Collaboration. Handbook of Research on Academic Library Partnerships and Collaborations. Ed. Brian Doherty. Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016: 1-30. Selected Pre sentations and Workshops Generous and Generative Communities for the Digital Humanities with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and Caribbean Studies. Refereed short paper presentation for the Digital Humanities 2017 Conference, Montral, Canada, Aug. 9, 2017. http://dloc.com/AA00052469/ Critical Connections with GLAMR (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums, Repositories) and Scholars. Refereed presentation within panel Collaboration Across Di sciplines to Make a Path Where None Existed for the Association of Caribbean University, Research, and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL) Conference, Puerto Rico, Jun. 5-9, 2017. http://dloc.com/AA00054636 Roundtable Discussion on Teaching with Caribbean Digital Libraries & Archives. Refereed presentation within Roundtable for the West Indian Literature Conference (WILC), University of the West Indies, Western Jamaica Campus, Montego Bay, Jamaica, Oct. 7, 2016. http://dloc.com/AA00040791 The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and Digital Humanities. Presented (with Leah Rosenberg, University of Florida) for the Diaspora and the Digital Workshop of the Diasporic L iterary Archives, New Haven, CT: Yale University, Oct. 24, 2014. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00024623/ Selected Gran ts Caribbean Studies Data Curati on, Host Institution (CLIR, 2017)Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital Humanities & the Caribbean (UF, 2017)Books about Florida & the Caribbean: from The Florida Press (Mellon, 2015)Digital Humanities Collaboration Bootcamp (UF, 2015)Developing Librarian" Digital Humanities Pilot Training Project (UF, 2014)Florida and Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project (NEH, 2013)

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MARGARITA VARGAS BETANCOURT, Ph.D. Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian University of Florida, Department of Special & Area Studies C ollections P.O. Box 117009, Gainesville, FL 32611-7009 mvargasb@ufl.edu | 352.273.2692 BRIEF DESCRIP TION OF JOB DUTIES D evelop and manage archival and rare book collections related to Latin America and the Caribbean. A ctivities associated to such collections: oversee and process archival material; serve as subject liaison with faculty, researchers, and student s; promote the collections; and provide reference. Liaison with Digital Production Services in the digitization of relevant material, obtaining funding from donors and granting agencies for the support of the Latin American and Caribbean special collections, and designing and implementing institutional collaborative agreements to increase open access to Latin American and Caribbean content. AREAS OF SPECI ALIZAT ION Archives and Manuscripts | Curation | Ethnohistory | Caribbean & Latin American Studies | Diversity EDUCATIONAL BACKG ROUND Tulane University, Latin American Studies, Ph.D. 2015 Tulane University, Latin American Studies, M.A, 2003 National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Hispanic Language & Literature, 2000 EMPLOYMENT L atin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian, Assistant University Librarian (tenuretrack), University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Department of Special and Area Studies Collections, Gainesville, Florida, Sep tember 2011present. Instructor, Marymount School, Social Sciences Department, Cuernavaca, Mexico, January 2009-July 2010. Assistant to the Curator of Special Collections Tulane University, Latin American Library, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 2002-May 2007. Exhibitions T he Cuban American Dream, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Smathers Library Gallery. March 27 -June 2nd, 2017. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00054774/00001 Mysteries of an Autograph (A bilingual exhibition exploring the mysteries of literary autographed books in the UF Latin American and Caribbean Collection), University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Smathers Library Gallery. September 26 -December 16, 2016. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00053035/00001 Voices from the Panama Canal (co -curator with Paul Losch), University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Smathers Library Gallery. August 11 -October 24, 2014.

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http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00026934/00001 Revolucionarias : Women and the Formation of the Cuban Nation (cocurator with Lillian Guerra), University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries, Smathers Library Gallery. March 31, 2014-May 16, 2014. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00020264/00001 PUBLICATIONS Santam araWheeler, Lourdes, Jessica Belcoure Marcetti, Rebecca Fitzsimmons, Margarita Vargas -Betancourt, and Sophia Krzys Acord, Community-based Collections: ARL SPEC Kit 347. Washington DC: Association of Research Libraries (ARL), July 2015. http://publications.arl.org/Communitybased Collections SPEC Kit -347/ Vargas Betancourt, Margarita, E. Haven Hawley, and Rebecca J.W. Jefferson, Shared Global Heritage in Research Libraries. In The Globalized Library: American Academic Libraries and International Students, Collections and Practices Edited by Y elena Luckert and Lindsay Inge. Chicago: ACRL Press. (Accepted). Apodaca, George, Na t alie Baur, and Margarita Vargas Beta ncourt, Breaking Down Borders: Dismantling Whiteness Through International Bridges. In Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science. Edite d by Gina Schlesselman Tarango. Sacramento: Litwin Books, 2017. Vargas -Betancourt Margarita, Continuity and Transformation in Central Mexico: The Legend of the Tepozteco and the people of Tepoztlan, The Legacy of Mesoamerica Ancestors: Archaeological Heritage in and beyond Contemporary Mexico edited by David S. Anderson, Dylan J. Clark, and J. Heath Anderson. Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 25 (2015): 50-58. doi: 10.1111/apaa.12046 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00007097/00001 Vargas Betancour t, Margarita, Santiago Tlatelolco y el sis tema hidrulico de la ciudad de Mxico (1523-1610) (Santiago Tlatelolco and the Hydrau lic System of Mexico City [1523 -1610]). In Los indios y las ciudades de la Nueva Espaa (Indigenous People and the Cities of The New Spain) re edited by Felipe Castro Gutirrez. Me xico City: Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Instituto de Investigaciones Histricas, 2013. www.historicas.unam.mx/publicaciones/publicadigital/libros/indiosciudades/indiosciudades.html Taylor, Laur ie, Margarita Vargas -Betancourt, and Brooke Wooldridge, The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC): Creating a Shared Research Foundation. Scholarly and Research Communication. Simon Fraser University 4, no. 3 (2013): 0301114, 7 pp. http://src -online.ca/src/index.php/src/article/view/114/246 Vargas Betancourt, Margarita, Caciques tlatelolcas y tenencia de la tierra en el siglo XVI (Tlatelolca Rulers and Land Tenure in the Sixteenth Century). Nuevo Mundo Mundos Nuevos Debates (New World, New Worlds, Debates) (2011). doi: 10.4000/nuevomundo.60635 http://nuevomundo.revues.org/60635

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Graduate Assistant Job De scription A graduate student at UF will be hired to assist the Codirectors in administering the program. The duties will include: creating the CSDHI website presence within the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) site; maintaining a database of applicat ions; creating a database of partici pants; creating and monitoring the discussion email list for participants; assisting in the set -up, recording, and dissemination of virtual sessions; and assisting with coordinatin g the logistics of the in person institute. The graduate student will be supervised by Co-director Taylor, and be supported by the George A. Smathers Libraries at the U niversity of F lorida Graduate Assistant for the Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute Pay Rate: $20 /hour. Number of students needed: 1. Time -limited position to run October 2018-August 2020. Hours: Total of 640 hours for the full program (in-person Institute May 20-24, 2019) Summary of Duties The Caribbean Studies Digital Human ities Institute (CSDHI) Graduate Assistant will participate in the CSDHI project activities alongside activities to support the community of participants in connection with the larger community of practice, and to connect the open access course materials produced the institute with ongoing programmatic work for open educational resources for Caribbean Studies. The graduate student will participate in website development, collaborative writing, editing, event development, and other activities all in suppor t of the Institute in -person and asynchronous communications, virtual sessions, community development, and course material development, which will include: creating the CSDHI website presence within the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) site maintai ning a database of applicat ions creating a database of partici pants creating and monitoring the discussi on email list for participants assisting in the set -up, recording, and dissemination of virtual sessions assisting with coordinating the logistics of the in person institute assisting with promotion of the institute for applicants on through the results of the institute participating in the graduate student mentorship opportunities within the Libraries writing and posting regular reflection and teaching pieces on the work with the CSDHI as part of the work to support building the community among participants and for the students own professional development Responsibilities The Graduate Assistant will be responsible for completing the planned activities, collaborating for these and other needs, and participating as a professional team member for the CSDHI Qualifications Knowledge about and interest in digital humanities and digital pedagogy; a go od attitude and professional demeanor; and willingness to work independently and collaboratively. Candidates must be graduate students. Excellent organizational and time management skills; r eliable and punctual Flexible, adaptable, and comfortable with experimentation and self directed learning Able and willing to learn new skills, enthusiasm for working collaboratively Excellent oral communication and writing skills Experience with using digital platforms for video conferencing, experience moderating email or other community communication systems

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An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries 201 Fine Arts A Architecture & Fine Arts Library PO Box 117017 Gainesville, FL 32611 7017 352273280522 February 2018 Lau rie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 Dear Dr. T aylor, I wr ite to confirm my commitment to participate as an instructor for the proposed institute, Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI) which will be hosted and organized by the University of Florida. As a graduate student in the School of Information at The University of Texas, I spent a semester working with Scalar, a digital publishing platform, and have led a training of the tool during THATCamp Gainesville in 2017. I would be delighted to offer instructi on on Scalar to the participants in the CSDHI. As a member of the Digital Humanities (DH) community and a co convenor of the Digital Humanities Working Group at the University of Florida, I am always excited to support the work of UFs faculty, staff, an d students in DH, whether developing programming or working with patrons to find DH solutions to their research and teaching needs. The CSDHI is a logical extension of this work. As a former Council on Library and Information Resources Postdoctoral Fellow, I recognize how valuable establishing a cohort is for communities of practice. Significantly, the participants will have the opportunity to develop as a community of scholars through both formal and informal connections across disparate fields of study wi thin the Humanities. Furthermore, the participants will acquire proficiency in DH tools, discuss related theory and methodologies, and produce Open Educational Resources for Caribbean Studies. Both the development of a community of practice and the investment in developing proficiency with regard to tools and theory will have a valuable impact on Digital Humanities pedagogy. Through teaching and resources developed, the participants will be able to widen the communities of DH and Caribbean Studies. The sel fassessment within the institutes teaching module will also be impactful for information professionals, who may not realize where digital resources are scarce. I will promote the work of the CSDHI through my professional organization listservs, Art Libraries Society of North America and Association of Architecture School Librarians, in order amplify the reach of the participants to art, architecture, and design communities. The C aribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute is a valuable opportunity to connect scholars of Caribbean and to develop new and engaging pedagogy, both through Digital Humanities. Sincerely, Jessica Aberle PhD, MSIS

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D igital Library of the Caribbean | FIU Libraries 11200 SW 8th Street, GL 310B, Miami, Florida 33199 | Tel. 305.348.3008 | www.dloc.com Feb ruary 16, 2018 Laurie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 Dear D r. Taylor, On b eha lf of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and FIU Libraries, I want to thank you for proposing a Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI) project to the National Endowment for the Humanities ( NEH ) Please acknowledge my commitment as Director of dLOC to contribute and participate as guest faculty for the CSDHI project being submitt ed by the University of Florida. I hope m y role as a trainer and expert in digital learning technologies will help contribute towards making this project a success. This project is important to the work we do because Digital Humanities is helping address some of the biggest challenges we face in teaching and learning, particularly the difficulties in accessibility of primary and secondary open access research and education materials. The importance of this project to those who will participate is further amplified by the responsibilities and roles they play on the frontlines of scholarly research and education endeavors. Participants will be provided with sound fundamentals and best practices to build stable foundations on which to expand their capabilities in creating successful collaborative communities of practice. Digital Humanities are still in relative early stages of adoption, discovery, and implementation of technological best practices, establishing sound principles and core resources early on will ensure a successful trajectory of research and scholarship in the digital age. Pro motion of the CSDHI project will be done throughout our extensive network of instituti onal partn ers, faculty, and scholarly research community in Caribbean Studies. As the largest and busiest online Caribbean content library, we will make sure to leverage our main sites reach ( www.dloc.com ) and through our social media engagement channels. We will also reach out directly via written invitations and information sessions for interested and qualified candidates. To rei terate my commitment to Caribbean S tudies, Open Access educatio n and resea rch materials, I support and endorse the CSDHI project proposal P lease feel free to contact me if you have questions or require any additional information. Sinc erely, Migu el Asencio Director

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Co llege of Liberal Arts & Sciences 103 Walker Hall African American Studies Program PO Box 118120 www.clas/ufl.edu/afam Gainesville, FL 32611 8120 3522733060 3522940007 Fax The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution March 2 2018 Dear Dr. Taylor : My name is Dr. Sharon D. Wright Austin. I am the Director of the African American St udies Program and an A ssociate P rofessor of P olitical S cience at the University of Florida and would like to enthusiasticall y endorse the proposal for the Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI) P roject This project is very important to me because of my research on African American/Caribbean issues. My third book, The Caribbeanization of Black Politics: Race, Group Consciousness, and Political Participation in America, was published this year by the State University of New York Press. My work examines the political behavior and social relationships amo ng African Americans, Haitians, West Indians, and Cape Verdeans in the cities of Boston, Chicago, Miami, and New York City. I also discuss the relationships among African Americans and Afro Caribbeans in my African American Politics, African American Studies Senior Seminar, and Theories of Black America courses. Many of my students are African American and/or are from the Caribbean. In my courses, we discuss the perceptions that first and second generation Caribbean immigrants/citizens have of African Americans and vice versa. We also discuss the fact that New York City has the largest West Indian population, but have elected few West Indians in political offices. Because of my research and teaching interests, I am very much willing to contribute to t he Institute at the University of Florida. Two African American Studies faculty members also study the Caribbean in their research and will be good resources for the Institute. Our university has a wealth of resources [especially the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) ] because of the many faculty members with teaching and research interests in the Caribbean Many of us are very excited about the opportunity to host the Institute and interact with its participants. In conclusion, I highly and e nthusiastically endorse this proposal. Please contact me at (352)273-3060 or polssdw@ufl.edu if you have any questions. Sincerely, Dr Sharon D. Austin, Director of the African American Studies Program and Associate Professor of Political Scien ce at the University of Florida

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Create Caribbean Inc. Research Institute at Dominica State College Stock Farm Campus P.O. B ox 2066, Roseau, Commonwealth of Dominica Phone: (767) 225-4 861 E-M ai l: createcarib@gmail.com To Whom It May Concern: I wr ite to confirm my commitment to participate in the CSDHI project. As outlined in the proposal, my role will be to serve as guest faculty and participants for workshops on selected topics related to migration, mobility and sustainability. My CV will demonstrate that I have the required knowledge and expertise to participate as a trainer for topics in sustainability and community practices as well as the pedagogical implications of these broader topics. As a s cholar of Caribbean literary and cultural studies, DLOC has been integral to my scholarship on through articles larger print and digital research projects. It is through my use of DLOC that I was able to recognize the extent of the gaps in knowledge sharing that exist between the Caribbean region and the wider diaspora. My experience conducting research on reading culture in the Caribbean from the late 19th century to the contemporary moment highlighted the ways that archives and rare materials about Caribbean life and culture are mostly housed outside the region and restrict the intellectual and cultural consciousness of Caribbean history within the Caribbean community. I reco gnized through DLOC how di gital spaces make possible the access of Caribbean people to their own displaced history via the openness, relative affordability and mobility of digital spaces and the histories shared in open access formats. CSDHI speaks directly to this mission in the way it is designed to train and engage more and more scholars to do this knowledge sharing using methodologies of democracy, innovation and openness. In fact, DLOC has presented opportunities for me to introduce students in the Caribbean classroom to these documents and topics by having them use DLOC as part of our literary and historical journeys in courses. Beyo nd the importance of CSDHI to Caribbean Studies, its impact on the landscape of digital humanities as a discipline is significant. The debates within digital humanities about how identity politics and minority histories are reflected in both the architecture and praxis of digital humanities from programming to design to dissemination. Certainly, we should use the platform to critique the ways in which software, archiving processes and tools for design can be improved and enhanced to include metadata and codes specific to the concerns and subjects of importance in Caribbean history and culture. Com pletion of the CSDHI will allow me to provide professional development training to librarians, archivists and faculty in Dominica and the Eastern Caribbean in topics of preservation and community outreach. I will also be able to share strategies for creating Caribbeancentered classrooms across all disci plines via digital tools and methodologies. Additionally, I will be able to energize the internship training of college students at Create Caribbean and students of my Digital Humanities Research course in specific areas of

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digital history and digital humanities, with a special emphasis on inter-g enerational experiential learning with the study and use of oral histories. Topics of sustainability are also more critical than ever in the age of climate change disaster. C SDHI discussions and training will provide opportunities for me to learn new approaches to integrating this topic in my teaching and mentorship. Students within the Caribbean and in the wider Caribbean diaspora of the United States will benefit from a richer texture of C aribbean Studies and a b roader understanding of digital humanities in their interactions with the scholar-t eacher participants of the CSDHI. Sincerely, _________________ Sch uyler K Esprit, PhD Founder and Director Create Caribbean Inc.

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An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries 555 Library West Scholarly Resources and Services PO Box 117000 Dr. Crystal A. Felima Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 felima@ufl.edu 352 273 0173 (office) March 1, 2018 Re : Letter of Commitment Dear Dr. Laurie Taylor: Wi th great enthusiasm, I submit this letter of commitment for the proposed Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI) project, submitted by the University of Florida. To contribute to the success of this project, I will serve as a faculty member to support the co -directors and other project members of the institute. Also, I will serve as an instructor and facilitator during the institute and virtual workshop sessions to offer my training and expertise in Caribbean Studies and digital pedagogy. As a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Data Curation, this project provides me an opportunity to share my interests and skills with other scholars and practicioners interested in area-specific digital humanities approaches I believe learning, conducting research, and presenting findings in digital humanities, data curation, and e-scholarship particularly in Latin American and Africana Studies offers critical engagement to decolonization and social engagement. Therefore, this institute would serve as an excellent opportunity to engage a range of scholars who are interested in learning skills in technology to further their interests in digital scholarship on the Caribbean. The project will provide participants an invaluable professional development opportunity in which they will learn from others while increasing their knowledge of applicable tools and approaches that they can employ to further their teaching and research projects. Thi s Institute will offer an important contribution to the field of digital humanities. The project aims to bring participants from a variety of academic and socio -cultural backgrounds to actively engag e in collobrative partnerships on the basis of social justice and critical approaches in digital pedagogy of the Caribbean. To support the success of this Institute, I will encourage participation from members in my professional organizations including the Haitian Studies Association, Association of Black Anthropologists, and the Caribbean Studies Association. In addition, I will use social media to promote the workshops and other activities and to highlight the results and products from the Institute. I am excited to contribute to this Institute and I offer my full support to the success of the project. If there are any questions, please feel free to contact me. Si ncerely, Cry stal Andrea Felima, PhD 2017-2019 Post-doctoral Fellow of Caribbean Studies Data Curation

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Feb ruary 20 2018 La urie N. Taylor dLOC Digital Scholarship Director UF Digital Scholarship Librarian University of Florida P.O. Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 De ar Dr. Laurie Taylor: I am honored to commit as a trainer and collaborator with the proposed NEH Advanced Institute in the Digital Humanities organized by the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in partnership with the Digital Library of the Carib bean (dLOC) This institute will focus on the topics of Caribbean Studies and digital humanities and is scheduled to begin March 2019 and end August 2020. I understand that I will take part in presentations and workshops during this time, with the aim t o provide necessary training on topics related to incorporating oral histories and digital materials related to Caribbean Studies into teaching practices. Sin ce 2006 I co direct with Dr. Nadjah Ros from the University of Puerto Rico The Diaspora Proje ct (DP) a research project that explores cultural texts, practices and artifacts produced by the Puerto Rican diaspora in the US Virgin Islands and has expanded to study the mobility and fluidity of cultural practices that take place in the Eastern Cari bbean. In fact, starting on January 2018 Dr. Ros and I are co investigators of the project Caribbean Diaspora: Panorama of Carnival Practices, a stage one project under the NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant that aims to explore migration and the Caribbean diaspora through the lens of cultural practices related to Carnival that will revitalize, reuse, and recover valuable existing digital archival materials and artifacts I believe my work as a researcher with DP as well as my experience as an academic administrator will provide effective trainning, guidance and structure in the development of lessons, modules, and/or courses using oral hist ories and integrating digital humanities into the classroom. I am convinced that UF DLOC proposed NEH Advanced Institute in the Digital Humanities will provide digital humanities scholars, library and archival experts, and Caribbean Studies researchers a space to discuss, create and propose new forms of producing digital knowledge for digital born users. The opportunity for wider collaboration with humanities scholars and media specialists and technicians will no doubt break new ground in the teaching and researching of Caribbean Studies. In fact, this project is of great value to the Digital Humanities, as it helps building the capacity of local scholars and media/information specialists to collaborate on producing high quality resources using valuable arc hives. The proposed experience as trainner and expert will also facilitate the recruitment of Caribbean Studies scholars from Puerto Rico and strengthen the University of Puerto Rico relation with the University of Floridas Digital Library of the Caribbea n (dLOC) project, with the ultimate aim of enabling contribution to its collections to support and catalyze digital research in and about the Caribbean. I a m honored to be part of this project, and am deeply committed to achieving its goals. Mi rerza Gonzlez, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs College of Humanities University of Puerto Rico

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries 542 Library West Humanities & Social Sciences Library PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 3522732637February 27, 2018 La urie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 Dear Dr. Taylor I a m writing to express my commitment for the Institute for Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities (IATDH) grant application submitted by the University of Florida (UF) to part icipate as an In -Person Institute Faculty Member who will copresent on teaching with digital collections at the Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI). The proposed presentation topic will cover the Florida & Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project (FPRDNP), the project that I manage for the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. This project s eeks to digitize historic newspapers from Florida & Puerto Rico for preservation and enhanced access. All digitized content is uploaded to the Library of Congresss site, Chronicling America. Presenting at the CSDHI will benefit th is project by enabling outreach with educators, which is one of the areas of focus for the FPRDNP It will teach attendees about Chronicling America, a resource they will be able to incorporate into their research and curriculum. Presenting on Chronicling America, and more specifi cally the FPRDNP, will allow for the showcasing of the underutilized Caribbean content that is made available via this newspaper project Thi s Institute will provide an opportunity for members of under-resourced organizations to learn about digital collections and tools used in Digital Humanities, expand their knowledge of digital collections and how to implement them in the classroom, and allow them to foster new connections and collaborate. Teaching participants about Digita l Humanities and tools used in the field will provide them with new ways of looking at and advancing Caribbean Studies. As acting project manager, I o versee and assist with outreach and promotion efforts for the FPRDNP, which will allow me to promote the modules and lessons created by participants of the I nstitute with our project partners at the University of Puerto Rico R o Piedras a s well as with our project followers Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and WordPress will be used to further disseminate these newly created materials with the community at large. Additionally, I will work to share this content, especially any Puerto Rico related materials, directly with FPRDNP coll aborating educators and others interested in Caribbean Studies. I a m honored to be part of such an important project and look forward to the commencement of this Institute. Si ncerely Melissa Jerome Melissa Jerome Project Coordinator Florida & Puerto Rico Digital Newspaper Project University of Florida

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| 1 en-US THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES en-US St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies en-US FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND EDUCATION en-US DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY en-US Telephone: (868) 662-2002 Ext 82025 Cell: (868) 767-4729 Email: en-US Debbie.McCollin@sta.uwi.edu en-US 01 March 2018 Laurie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 en-US De ar Dr. Taylor, I am pleased to accep t the invitation to be a part of the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities P roject being proposed by my colleagues at the Un iversity of F lorida. I have taught Di gital Hi story at T he U niversity of the W est I n dies for many years and it is the first course of its kind within our system. A s the digital world expands it is clear that ther e is a growing need to incorporate digital tech nology into tertiary level c ourse designs and class interactions and activities. I t is equally evident however that t oo few are enga g ed in this area, even in 2018 M y work is specifically ensconced in the humanities, a critical yet challenged field. A s humanities lecturers and instructors the world over gain greater insight into the use of such technology to advance their peda gogy student s will be come more attracted and engaged the humanities will take on a greater relevance in the minds of decision makers and the survival of the field will be ensured. Th is project with its focus on enhancing the opportuniti es in this area for under resourced institutions and those with preservation concerns in the Un ited S tates is ess ential in s uch a s ociety that is a leader in this area of digital technology A t no point should there be such an extensive g ap in technical and pedagogical knowledge among institutions and educational professionals with in a country that is so greatly advanced Th is project aptly seeks to narrow this gap and expose the underexposed to essential skills. A s a C aribbean person I am also pleased by the focus on C aribbean S cholarship and can envision such a project eventuall y ( in its second iteration possibly) expanding to include teachers scholars and archivists from the C aribbean, who are in even greater need. Th is project can only strengthen our field further.

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| 2 I therefore thoroughly suppo rt the objectives of the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Project and look forward to participating in such a significant venture. Yours sincerely, De bbie McCollin (PhD) Lecturer The Department of History Faculty of Humanities and E ducation The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, We st Indies.

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Nad jah Ros Villarini, PhD Associate Professor English Department College of General Studies University of Puerto Rico PO Box 23323 San Juan, P.R. 00931-03323 Febr uary 23, 2018 Laur ie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 Dear Laurie Taylor: I am pleased and honored to commit to being part of the digital humanity team in the proposed CSDHI Project by the University of Florida. I understand tha t as part of the project I will be participating in presentations and workshops as a trainer and expert. This experience will not only give me an opportunity to disseminate the project Caribbean Diaspora: Panorama of Carnival Practices sponsored by the N at ional E ndowment of the H umanities but also it would provide me the opportunity to share the process of conceptualizing and creating an interactive website to make data accessible for a general audience. For t he University of P uerto Rico this institute is an opportunity to establish and strengthen new networks with colleagues in the United States working with collections related to the Caribbean region. Due to the technological limitations in the Caribbean library system projects in this region are seminal to document, preserve and disseminate the rich history, traditions and cultures of these islands. I look forward to wor king as part of digital humanities team that will contribute to the enrichment of humanities scholarship and the public. Sin cerely, Nad jah Ros Villarini

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution George A. Smathers Libraries Department of Special and Area Studies Collections Laurie Taylor, PhD Digital Scholarship Librarian George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 Febr uary 21, 2018 Dr. T aylor, I w rite this letter to confirm my commitment to contribute to the proposed Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute (CSDHI) project, being submitted by the University of Florida (UF) in my role as a trainer and expert. As t he Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian at UF and the archivist at the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) I have worked towards challenging underrepresentation through the development of archival and digital collections, and by travelling to Latin Ame rica and the Caribbean inviting libraries and archives to become dLOC partners. This grant will allow me to continue this line of work. More importantly, t his project will allow partners from the Caribbean who have just experienced major natural disasters and who will continue to experience them, to benefit from the training and support we will provide in order to better preserve and provide access to the cultural heritage of their communities. At the same time, the in -person and virtual training sessions will contribute to the practice of digital humanities by enabling the participation of underrepresented communities. The project will also benefit UF and dLOC because it will allow us to better understand the needs of our partners. I will promote this project among the faculty of UFs Center for Latin American Studies and also among the archivists of the Society of American Archivists, especially those who belong to the Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives (LACCHA). Fina lly, I reiterate my commitment to conduct the instruction sessions assigned to me and to promote the project. Sin cerely, Margarita Vargas Betancourt Marg arita Vargas -Betancourt, Ph.D. Latin American and Caribbean Special Collections Librarian 300D Smathers Library PO Box 117009 Gainesville, FL 32611

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Budget Narrative File(s) Budget Attachment Filename(s): Budget Narrative Attachment Form.pdf