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Schedule for the Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute 

Phase 1: Pre-institute (March-May 2019):

Required readings:

  • Amy E. Earhart and Toniesha L. Taylor. “Pedagogies of Race: Digital Humanities in the Age of Ferguson.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Eds. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. 251-264: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/72
  • Roopika Risam. “Navigating the Global Digital Humanities: Insights from Black Feminism.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Eds. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. 359-367: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/2
  • Miriam Posner, “How’d They Make That?” 23 August 2013, http://miriamposner.com/blog/howdid-they-make-that/

Other resources:


Phase 2: In-person Session (May 20-24, 2019)

The Institute’s primary goals are for participants to learn and adapt digital humanities tools and practices to the needs of their students and their own needs for teaching and inclusion in a digital humanities community of practice. The in-person week will thus mirror the same steps taken in developing Open Educational Resources for local implementation and for sharing with effective integration in other courses. The sessions each day will ground technologies with use cases in Caribbean Studies, present existing Caribbean DH resources and communities, and engage participants in hands-on work with technologies, digital pedagogy, DH, and Caribbean Studies teaching practices.

 

May 20 | Day 1: Welcome, Teaching with Digital Repositories, and Metadata

Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza González, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini; with Bess de Farber, Crystal Felima, Melissa Jerome

Topics & Skills:

  • Overview of key methods, issues, and concepts for utilizing resources from and collaborating with Caribbean Studies Repositories (including dLOC, The Diaspora Project, Dutch Caribbean Digital Platform, National Digital Newspaper Program, and Umbral)
  • Teaching metadata as a boundary concept across teaching faculty, libraries, and archives for utilizing materials in teaching, using collections as part of teaching and class production, identifying limitations to the field and research questions from gaps in collections, and developing competencies in metadata for enabling next step, advanced research

Reading:

  • Alex Gil and Élika Ortega. “Global Outlooks in Digital Humanities: Multilingual Practices and Minimal Computing.” Doing Digital Humanities. Eds. Richard Lane, Raymond Siemens, and Constance Crompton. London/NY: Routledge, 2016. 22-34.
  • Leah Rosenberg. “Refashioning Caribbean Literary Pedagogy in the Digital Age.” Caribbean Quarterly (62:3-4), 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00086495.2016.1260282

Schedule for May 20 | Day 1: Welcome, Teaching with Digital Repositories, and Metadata

Location: Latin American & Caribbean Collections, Smathers Library (afternoon in Smathers, room 100)

8:30-9:15am

Welcome and overview of Institute (Co-Directors)

9:15-11:15am

CoLAB introductions (de Farber)

11:15-11:30am

Break

11:30am-12:30pm

Lecture & Discussion: Orientation to Caribbean Studies digital repositories for DH teaching (Guest Faculty, Felima, Jerome)

12:30-1:30pm

Lunch

2-3pm

Lecture & Workshop: Using, analyzing, and creating metadata to bridge collections, DH, and the classroom. Locating items in repositories with reference metadata to create sets in Excel based on location and time; spreadsheets to be used in workshops on day 2 (Huet, Taylor)

3-3:15pm

Break

3:15-4:45pm

Pedagogical Session Workshop: Review of syllabi or course descriptions from applications. What repositories connect based on content? With migration, mobility, and sustainability, where would timelines, maps, and oral histories expand on pedagogy in terms of questions and study within the course? (Guest faculty and Co-directors)

 

May 21 | Day 2: Mobility & Movement: Presenting & Visualizing DH Caribbean Studies

Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza González, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini; with Margarita Vargas Betancourt

Topics & Skills:

  • Organizing and breaking down digital resources into granular data for presenting and visualizing with maps and timelines
  • Creating basic data visualizations as timelines, story maps, and maps from spreadsheets
  • Introducing “data” as concept and data materials in the classroom

Readings:

 

Schedule for May 21 | Day 2: Mobility & Movement; Presenting & Visualizing DH Caribbean Studies

Location: Smathers Library, room 100 (afternoon in Latin American & Caribbean Collections, Smathers Library)

8:30-10am

Discussion & Workshop: StoryMapJS for location and time, with structured data and repository materials (Taylor)

10-10:15am

Break

10:15-12pm

Discussion & Workshop: Google Maps for locations, with structured data and repository materials (Huet)

12-1pm

Lunch

1-3pm

Discussion & Workshop: TimelineJS for locations, with structured data and repository materials (Taylor)

3-3:15pm

Break

3:15-5pm

Pedagogical Session Discussion & Hands-On: Into the Archives, hands-on with an unprocessed, analog collection for considering the value, impact, and opportunities with digital tools and the digital humanities; DH metadata assignments in the classroom to tell stories of analog materials, and to place materials in context; discussion about what happens when materials are digitized in terms of the object, for what gets lost and what changes (for example if you think about a photograph: the image becomes the focus, not the original context, the method of production, slide, color photography, albumen, carbon print, cyanotype, etc.)  (Vargas Betancourt, Guest Faculty, Co-directors)

 

May 22 | Day 3: Stories of Migration; DH Teaching with Oral Histories

Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza González, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini; with Sharon Austin and Mary Risner

Topics & Skills:

  • Overview of key methods, issues, and concepts for oral history collections and materials in the DH classroom
  • Navigating oral history tool options in the classroom

Readings:

 

Schedule for May 22 | Day 3: Stories of Migration; DH Teaching with Oral Histories

Location: Marston Science Library, Visualization Lab, room 136 (ground/garden level)

8:30-10am

Lecture and Discussion: The Diaspora Project (González, Rios Villarini)

10-10:30am

Break, and walk to the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program offices with production studio and archives

10:30-12:30pm

Pedagogical Session Discussion & Hands-On: Into the Archives for an oral history program and archives; hands-on with processed and unprocessed analog and born-digital collections; discussion of DH oral history teaching and assignments in the classroom to share individual voices and community stories, and to place materials in context (Austin, Ortiz, González, Groenewoud, Rios Villarini)

12:30-1:30pm

Lunch

1:30-3pm

Pedagogical Session: Finding and using oral histories, audio recordings and audiobooks (Risner, Co-directors), giving voice (González, Rios Villarini), and playlist pedagogy (Groenewoud)

3-3:15pm

Break

3:15-5pm

Workshop: Creating an assignment utilizing oral histories held in digital repositories, explaining connection to themes (migration, mobility, and sustainability), and specific course(s) for the assignment (Guest Faculty, Co-directors).

 

May 23 | Day 4: Sustainability; Platforms for Framing the DH Classroom

Guest Faculty: Miguel Asencio, Schuyler Esprit, Mirerza González, Margo Groenewoud, Debbie McCollin, Nadjah Rios Villarini

Topics & Skills:

  • Scaffolding DH training in the classroom for eventual public presentation as digital/public humanities
  • Finding, evaluating, and using platforms for digital humanities projects and teaching

Reading:

 

Schedule for May 23 | Day 4: Sustainability; Platforms for Framing the DH Classroom

Location: Marston Science Library, Visualization Lab, room 136 (ground/garden level)

8:30-10:30am

Pedagogical Session: Privacy, Intellectual Property, and Credit in Classroom DH (Co-directors)

10:30-10:45am

Break

10:45-12:30pm

Discussion: Repositories and platforms for course production (Asencio, Esprit, González, Groenewoud, McCollin, Rios Villarini, Co-directors)

12:30-1:30pm

Lunch

1:30-3pm

Workshop: Making a course website as a Scalar book, integrating digital repository materials (Co-directors)

3-3:15pm

Break

3:15-5pm

Workshop: Embedding Google Maps, TimelineJS, and StoryMapJS in Scalar (Huet, Taylor)

 

May 24 | Day 5: Sustainability; Teaching, DH, & Fostering Community Practices

Guest Faculty: Schuyler Esprit, Debbie McCollin, Mirerza González, Margo Groenewoud, and Nadjah Rios Villarini

Topics & Skills:

  • Implementing these skills, tools, and methods in the classroom
  • Designing the DH course materials, for implementation in Phase 4

Readings:

 

Schedule for May 24 | Day 5: Sustainability; Pedagogy, DH, & Fostering Community

Location: Smathers Library, room 100

8:30-10am

Discussion: Designing, scoping, and scaffolding a classroom DH assignment for use in individual courses, shared for other courses, and collaborative courses (Guest Faculty, Co-directors)

10-10:15am

Break

10:15-11:45pm

Pedagogical Session: Evaluating and grading a digital humanities assignment; discussion of student assignments and projects with dLOC (Asencio), Create Caribbean (Esprit), Digital History (McCollin), Social Justice and History in the Dutch Caribbean (Groenewoud), and Diaspora Project (González and Rios)

11:45am-12:45pm

Lunch

12:45-3:15pm

Workshop: Participants work on DH and Caribbean Studies course materials, including identifying plans for evaluation

3:15-3:30pm

Break

3:30-4:30pm

Discussion: Wrapping up, considerations for invigorating the humanities with the digital humanities within and across our institutions; opportunities for collaborative engagement within and beyond single institutions, contributing to shared resources to grow the community of practice


Phase 3: Virtual Sessions and Asynchronous Communication, July –December 2019: Virtual sessions on specific technologies, practices, and ongoing asynchronous communication:

  • July 2019 | Pedagogical Practice for Teaching with Scalar
    • Led by Hélène Huet, Mary Risner, and Laurie Taylor University of Florida
  • August 2019 | Playlist Pedagogy for DH Teaching and Production with Oral Histories
    • Led by Margo Groenewoud, Assistant Professor, University of Curaçao
  • September 2019 | StoryMapJS in Haitian Studies, Disaster Studies, and Digital Humanities in the Undergraduate Classroom
    • Led by Crystal Felima, Postdoctoral Fellow in Caribbean Studies Data Curation, UF
  • October 2019 | Into the Archives: Engaging Classes in the Archives with Metadata
    • Led by Margarita Vargas Betancourt, Caribbean Collections Archivist, UF
  • November 2019 | Enhancing Our Communities of Practice: Intentional and Generous Socio-Technical Supports
    • Led by Leah Rosenberg, UF and dLOC Scholarly Advisory Board Co-Chair

Phase 4: Teaching Module Development for Teaching DH Locally, January-April 2020:

Participants will, if course selection allows, implement their DH course materials in early 2020. Participants will self-select on this, where some may not be teaching during this time period or may not be teaching in a related area. Those who teach during this semester will be asked to provide reflective writings on their teaching experiences for these materials. Those who do not teach the course materials developed from the Institute will be asked to provide a reflective assessment of their local resources and needs if they were to teach the course. This assessment will inform strategies for the community to collectively support individual needs for DH teaching related to Caribbean Studies and connecting across through the themes of migration, mobility, and sustainability. During this phase, ongoing asynchronous communication will continue for the group as a whole through an email list.


Phase 5: Publication and Dissemination, May-August 2020:

The final phase will collect and build upon the activities and discussions to date, and the evaluations. The participants will also be asked to complete a qualitative survey reflecting on the development, highlighting strategies they used and the particularities of teaching digital humanities. During this final phase, participants will finalize the DH teaching materials that they developed and their reflective assessments. Participants will share the course materials for inclusion with the other teaching materials as Open Educational Resources in dLOC. The project Co-directors will collate and publish all of the materials in dLOC and will disseminate news of the new materials and white paper on various email lists, Twitter, and at onsite venues for dissemination and next steps. Further, the project Co-directors will collaborate with Risner for dissemination of teaching materials to instructors in advanced secondary schools.


NEH

This Institute has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this Institute, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.