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The Panama Canal - Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00009715/00001
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Title: The Panama Canal - Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement
Physical Description: Grant proposal
Creator: Russell, Judith C.
Schipper, Rachel A.
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2012
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Subjects / Keywords: Grant proposal
Data management plan
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Abstract: The George A. Smathers Libraries (the Libraries) at the University of Florida (UF) requests $499,994 in Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)  National Leadership Grant (NLG) resources for the period of October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2015 to: 1) actualize, integrate, evaluate, and disseminate museum materials from the Panama Canal Museum (PCM), a 501c3 museum facility located in Seminole, Florida with plans to close and terminate services as of March 31, 2012;  2) lead and facilitate a multi‐institutional centennial celebration of the opening Panama Canal in 2014‐2015 to promote public understanding of the achievement and the heritage resources available for scholarly, educational, and civic purposes; and 3) initiate a national dialog about the potential for best practices in library‐museum collaborations, strategic alliances, and partnerships. Formal partners include the Panama Canal Museum, the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Also participating are the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, College of Business, College of Fine Arts, College of Engineering, Health Science Center and Legal Information Center, all at UF. Non‐UF collaborating institutions include the Museum of Science and Industry (Tampa), Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), the Natural History Museum of San Diego, Museo del Canal Interoceánico de Panamá, National Archives and Records Administration, and the Association of Southeast Research Libraries, with other participants in development. The ongoing economic downturn has created significant, long‐term financial pressures for the nonprofit sector, and museums have suffered as government funding and contributed income has decreased. Institutions have more actively explored options ranging from strategic alliances to joint operations to mergers. This project will develop and document the first known example of a full closure of a small museum and the transfer of its community and collections to an academic library within a large public research university. Capturing the strategies, challenges, milestones, and lessons of this collaboration will create a demonstration model for the field (libraries, archives, and museums). This case goes beyond the important transfer and integration of collection assets: it includes integration and “stewardship” of a unique community of some 800 PCM members and 3,000 Panama Canal Society (PCS) members. Many are already active and all are seen as potential leaders, volunteers, legacy ambassadors, and collection donors. Project activities related to the integration process include asset mapping and community cultivation; ongoing documentation and evaluation of the merger process; museum stewardship and internships; collection development, organization, preservation, and digitization; K‐12 educational assets, and convening two national virtual dialogs related to mergers and deep collaboration between museums and libraries. The celebration of the centennial of the opening of the Panama Canal (in August 2014) provides a powerful focus and accelerant to collection integration and broad collaboration to support development of physical and online exhibits, guest lectures, and development/dissemination of K‐12 curriculum materials. These will serve the immediate university community of 60,000 students and 25,000 faculty and staff from UF and Santa Fe College, as well as families, communities, and tourists within the region, and beyond. Outcomes from the project focus on a successful merger and PCM collection integration, and its documentation and articulation as a fulsome demonstration model. Outcomes will also include and be measured by the continuing vibrancy of the PCM member community, and the facets and impact of the centennial celebration. Deliverables also include a project white paper, IMLS evaluation report, Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Spec Kit (survey results and documentation from member institutions to provide resource guides), journal articles, conference presentations, two national dialogs on library/museum mergers, and a collection that will serve scholars, researchers, and the public for generations to come.
General Note: Includes digital curation and preservation portion of the data management plan as is standard for IMLS grant proposals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID: AA00009715:00001

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaAbstract The George A. Smathers Libraries (the Libraries) at the University of Florida (UF) requests $499,994 in Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grant (NLG) resources for the period of October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2015 to: 1) actualize, integrate, evaluate, and disseminate museum materials from the Panama Canal Museum (PCM), a 501c3 museum facility located in Seminole, Florida with plans to close and terminate services as of March 31, 2012; 2) lead and facilitate a multi institutional centennial celebration of the opening Panama Canal in 2014 2015 to promote public understanding of the achievement and the heritage resources available for scholarly, educational, and civic purposes; and 3) initiate a national dialog about the potential for best practices in library museum collaborations, strategic alliances, and partnerships. Formal partners include the Panama Canal Museum, the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Also participating are the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, College of Business, College of Fine Arts, College of Engineering, Health Science Center and Legal Information Center, all at UF. Non UF collaborating institutions include the Museum of Science and Industry (Tampa), Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), the Natural History Museum of San Diego, Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam National Archives and Records Administration, and the Association of Southeast Research Libraries, with other participants in development. The ongoing economic downturn has created significant, long term financial pressures for the nonprofit sector, and museums have suffered as government funding and contributed income has decreased. Institutions have more actively explored options ranging from strategic alliances to joint operations to mergers. This project will develop and document the first known example of a full closure of a small museum and the transfer of its community and collections to an academic library within a large public research university. Capturing the strategies, challenges, milestones, and lessons of this collaboration will create a demonstration model for the field (libraries, archives, and museums). This case goes beyond the important transfer and integration of collection assets: it includes integration and “stewardship” of a unique community of some 800 PCM members and 3,000 Panama Canal Society (PCS) members. Many are already active and all are seen as potential leaders, volunteers, legacy ambassadors, and collection donors. Project activities related to the integration process include asset mapping and community cultivation; ongoing documentation and evaluation of the merger process; museum stewardship and internships; collection development, organization, preservation, and digitization; K 12 educational assets, and convening two national virtual dialogs related to mergers and deep collaboration between museums and libraries. The celebration of the centennial of the opening of the Panama Canal (in August 2014) provides a powerful focus and accelerant to collection integration and broad collaboration to support development of physical and online exhibits, guest lectures, and development/dissemination of K 12 curriculum materials. These will serve the immediate university community of 60,000 students and 25,000 faculty and staff from UF and Santa Fe College, as well as families, communities, and tourists within the region, and beyond. Outcomes from the project focus on a successful merger and PCM collection integration, and its documentation and articulation as a fulsome demonstration model. Outcomes will also include and be measured by the continuing vibrancy of the PCM member community, and the facets and impact of the centennial celebration. Deliverables also include a project white paper, IMLS evaluation report, Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Spec Kit (survey results and documentation from member institutions to provide resource guides), journal articles, conference presentations, two national dialogs on library/museum mergers, and a collection that will serve scholars, researchers, and the public for generations to come.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE ONE 1. Applicant Information a. Legal Name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Organizational unit (if different from Legal Name) : George A. Smathers Libraries c. Organizational Unit Address Street1: 219 Grinter Hall Street2: City: Gainesville County: Alachua State: Florida Zip+4/Postal Code: 32611 d. Web Address: http ://www.uflib.ufl.edu e. Type of Institution (Check one): Academic Library Library Association School Library or School District applying on behalf of a School Library or Libraries Aquarium Library Consortium Arboretum/Botanical Garden Museum Library Art Museum Museum Services Organization/ Association Science/Technology Museum Children’s/Youth Museum Special Library Community College Native American Tribe/Native Hawaiian Organization Specialized Museum ** Four-year College State Library General Museum* Natural History/ Anthropology Museum State Museum Agency Graduate School of Library and Information Science State Museum Library Nature Center Zoo Historic House/Site Planetarium Institution of higher education other than listed above Historically Black College or University Public Library Research Library/Archives Other, please specify: History Museum *A museum with collections representing two or more disciplines equally (e.g., art and history) **A museum with collections limited to one narrowly defi ned discipline (e.g., textiles, maritime, ethnic group) 2. Grant Program or Grant Category a. 21s t Century Museum Professionals b. Congressionally Directed Grants c. Connecting to Collections: Statewide Grants d. Conservation Project Support General Conservation Survey Detailed Conservation Survey Environmental Survey Environmental Improvements Treatment Training e. Grants for Learning Labs in Libraries and Museums Select Museum or Library: Museum Library f Laura Bush 21s t Century Librarian Program Select Funding Category: Project Grant Collaborative Planning Grant National Forum Planning Grant Select Project Category: Master’s-level Programs Doctoral-level Programs Research: Early Career Development Continuing Education Programs to Build In stitutional Capacity Scholarship Continuation g. Museum Grants for African American History and Culture h. Museums for America Engaging Communities Building Institutional Capacity Collections Stewardship i. National Leadership Grants Select Museum or Library : Museum Library Select Funding Category: Project Grant Planning Grant National Forum Grant Select Project Category: Advancing Digital Resources Demonstration Library Museum Collaboration Research j. Native American/Native Hawaiian Library Services Basic Grant only Basic Grant with Education/ Assessment Option Enhancement Grant Native Hawaiian Library Services continued on next page...

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE TWO 2. Grant Program or Grant Category (cont’d) k. Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services Programming Professional Development Enhancement of Museum Services l. Sparks! Ignition Grants Select Museum or Library : Museum Library 3. Request Information a. IMLS funds requested: $499,994.00 b. Cost share amount: $559,038.00 4. Museum Profile (Museum Applicants only) a. Is the institution either a unit of state or local governm ent or a private not-for-profit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code and that is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes? Yes No b. Does the institution own or use tangible objects, whether animate or inanimate? Yes No c. Does the institution care for tangibl e objects whether animate or inanimate? Yes No d. Are these objects exhibited by the in stitution to the general public on a regular basis through facilities the institution owns or operates? Yes No e. Is the institution open and exhibiting tangible objects to the general public at least 120 days a year through facilities th e institution owns or operates? Yes No Institution’s attendance for the 12-month period prior to the application: Onsite: Offsite: Year the institution was first open and exhibiting to the public: Total number of days the institution was open to the public for the 12-month period prior to application: f. Does the institution employ at least one professional staff member, or the fulltime equivalent, whether paid or unpaid, who is primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibiti on to the public of tangible objects owned or used by the institution? Yes No Number of full-time paid institution staff: Nu mber of full-time unpaid institution staff: Number of part-time pai d institution staff: Number of pa rt-time unpaid institution staff: g. Fiscal year Revenue/ Support Income Expenses/ Outlays Budget deficit (if applicable)* Budget surplus (if applicable)* Most recently completed FY Second most recently completed FY *If Institution has a budget deficit or surplus for either of the two most recently comp leted fiscal years, please explain the circumstances of this deficit or surplu s in the Text Responses se ction of the application. 5. Project Partners In the space below, please list the names of any organizations t hat are official partners in the project. All official partners must include a completed Partnership Statement Form in this package. Panama Canal Museum; Florida Museum of Natural History; Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 6. Native Hawaiian Organizati on Eligibility (Native American/Native Hawaiian Programs only) Is the institution an eligible not-for-pro fit organization that primarily serves and represents Native Hawaiians (as defined in Title 20 U.S.C. Section 7517; if yes, see Proof of Eligibility requirements)? Yes No

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE THREE 7. Institutional Profile (Native Am erican Library Services Grants only) a. Number of hours per week the library collection is accessible to patrons: b. Number of staff dedicated full-time to library operations: c. Number of staff with part-time library duties: d. Number of items in the collection (books, journals, media): e. Number of items checked out per year: f. Does library staff have ac cess to the Internet? Yes No g. Does the library provide public access to the Internet? Yes No h. Amount of operating budget for library services in most recently completed fiscal year: i. Identify which of the following activities will be supported by grant funds (check all that apply): Expand services for learning and access to information and educational resources. Develop library services that provide all users with access to information. Provide electronic and other linkages between and among all types of libraries. Develop public and private partnerships with other agencies and community-based organizations. Target library services to help increase the access and t he ability to use information resources for individuals of diverse backgrounds, with disabilities, or with limited functional literacy or information skills. Target library and information services to help increase the access and the ability to use information resources for persons having difficulty using a library, and for underserved urban and rural communities. j. Maintenance of Effort (check the appropriate response): This year’s expenditures will equal or exceed previous 12 month grant period. Maintenance of effort is assured. This year’s expenditures will not equal or exceed previ ous 12 month expenditure. Maintenance of effort is not assured. Maintenance of effort does not apply. 8. Collection and Material Information (Conservation Project Support Grants only) a. Type of Collection Art History Natural History Anthropology Living Plants Living Animals b. Types of Materials. Use a scale from 1 (primarily affected) to 4 (minimally a ffected) to show which collection types are primarily affected by the project: aeronautics, space/airplanes horol ogical (clocks) photography, negatives animals, live landscape features, constructed photography, prints animals, preserved machinery physical science projects anthropologic, ethnographic maritime, historic ships plants, live archaeological medals plants, preserved books medical, dental, health, pharmacological sculpture, indoor Ceramics, glass, metals, plastics sculpture, outdoor documents, manuscripts military, in cluding weapons textiles and costumes furniture/wooden objects moti on picture, audiovisual tools geological, mineral, paleontological musical instruments toys and dolls numismatics (money) transportation, excluding airplanes historic building paintings historic sites philatelic (stamps) works of art on paper

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaOrganizational Profile (Smathers Libraries and partners: Panama Canal Museum, Florida Museum of Natural History, Harm Museum of Art) The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville, Florida form the largest public library service and information resource system in the state of Florida serving 4 million onsite visitors annually with more than 5.6 million volumes, 7.9 million microfilms, 453,000 e books, 158,695 full text electronic journals, and 1,162 electronic databases. The Libraries’ mission is to support teaching, research, and service. The extensive collections are distributed in eight libraries across campus, the Legal Information Center and an off site book storage facility. (Borland?) Faculty/staff include 96 library faculty, 189 staff and a large contingent of student workers. Public programs, at no cost to patrons, include lectures, exhibits, and events that are vital to the Libraries’ mission and serve over 17,000 participants annually. Since its inception in 1997, the Digital Library Center (DLC) has grown into one of the largest capacity digitization facilities in the southeastern U.S. The DLC manages 300 digital collections containing over seven million pages of content within the UF Digital Collections (UFDC). Collaborative projects with local, national, and international partners transcend institutional boundaries creating virtual treasure troves for researchers worldwide. These include unique manuscripts, antique maps rare children’s literature books theses and dissertations Florida and Caribbean newspapers, oral histories, and online exhibits In 2011, item views to UFDC totaled nearly 26 million. The academic community served by the Libraries includes some 60,000 students and 25,000 faculty and staff at UF and nearby Santa Fe College. The Panama Canal Museum (PCM) in Seminole, Florida, is the only museum in the world founded to preserve the history of the U.S. in Panama with a focus on the Panama Canal (1904 1999). The PCM recognizes the contributions of all nations in this 20th century engineering marvel, focusing on the construction, operation, maintenance, and defense of the canal during its formative years. Activities developed from efforts associated with a Museum Assessment Program grant awarded by the American Association of Museums (AAM) in 2003 include: a Speaker’s Bureau, educational outreach programs (e.g., “Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk”) and conserving and preserving the museum’s collections. Its professional affiliations include American Association of Museums (AAM), the Florida Association of Museums (FAM), the American Association for State and Local History, and the Panama Canal Society (PCS) among others. The Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) was chartered by the Florida Legislature in 1917 and is the state’s official natural history museum. Each year 185,000 guests visit the museum; outreach programs serve an additional 130,000 people, and more than 4.5 million users visit the museum website. With more than 34 million specimens of amphibians, birds, butterflies, fish, mammals, mollusks, reptiles, vertebrate and invertebrate fossils, recent and fossil plants, and associated databases and libraries, the Florida Museum is the largest natural history museum in the southeastern U.S. The museum has 100 full time and 120 part time faculty and staff members and 600 volunteers. The museum’s annual operating budget is $16 million. It is accredited by the AAM, and is an institutional member of the Association of Science Technology Centers, the Natural Science Collections Alliance, FAM and the Southeastern Museums Conference. The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art (Harn) one of the largest university affiliated art museums in the U.S., serves an average annual audience of 84,000. The museum’s collections of nearly 7,000 works of art reflect the breadth of UF’s areas of academic scholarship. With African, Asian, modern and contemporary art and photography collections, the museum contributes to the intellectual vitality of the institution through collaborations with faculty, staff, and students in exhibitions, publications, and programming. The Harn occupies 86,800 sq. ft. including 32,800 in exhibition space and a 250 seat auditorium. A new 26,000 sq. ft. addition dedicated to the exhibition, storage, and conservation of the museum’s extensive collection of Asian art will open in March 2012.

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement: Building new models of stewardship, public engagement, and governance for academic libraries “…you will have earned the right to say, ’that man did his full duty’ because he was connected honorably with the greatest feat of the kind ever performed by America, the greatest feat ever performed by any nation in the history of the entire world.” (Theodore Roosevelt, 1906) The University of Florida (UF) Smathers Libraries (the Libraries) respectfully request $499,994 in IMLS NLG Program funding to: 1) actualize, document, and evaluate the Libraries’ merger with, formalization of governance and common mission for (Dornseif, 2001), and full integration of operations, programs, and collections of the Panama Canal Museum (PCM), currently an independent 501c3 organization with a facility located in Seminole, Florida, which will close in July 2012; 2) lead and participate in a multi institutional centennial celebration of the Panama Canal opening in 2014 2015 to promote public understanding of the achievement and the heritage resources available for scholarly, educational, and civic purposes; and 3) initiate a national dialog about the potential for and best practices in library museum mergers, strategic alliances and partnerships, and other forms of collaboration. This public academic library museum merger integration is understood to be the first example of such a combination at this scale. Capturing the strategies, challenges, milestones, and lessons of this merger will create a demonstration model for the field. Equally, this project will explore the potential for expanded roles for public academic libraries in preserving critical heritage of global significance. Beyond the project’s goal to successfully integrate and preserve the PCM’s collections – ensuring public and scholarly access – it will create a new stewardship model involving the broad community of PCM museum members, volunteers, and constituents already contributing to collection integration and metadata strategies, and forge new collaborations with a rich ecology of aligned institutions holding relevant collections or otherwise involved in Panama Canal heritage. This ecology currently includes as major partners the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) and the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art (Harn Museum). Also participating at UF are the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP), Center for Latin American Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, College of Business, College of Fine Arts, College of Engineering, Health Science Center, and Legal Information Center, with other collaborators in review. Non UF collaborating institutions include the Museum of Science and Industry (Tampa), Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), Historical Museum of San Diego, Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and Association of Southeast Research Libraries (ASERL), with others in development. The PCM collection involved in this merger captures not only one of world’s greatest civil engineering achievements, but as historian Julie Greene (2009) has emphasized, one of world’s extraordinary social engineering achievements. Building and maintaining the Panama Canal project depended on building and nurturing a “human infrastructure” and culture that is a foundational asset in this heritage. This project has the potential to articulate and highlight the Panama Canal heritage such that it becomes a vibrant source of inspiration for world changing achievement; a human story of audacious dreams, political will, and personal sacrifice, and an exemplar of engineering innovation and the soft boundaries of scale (Ferrari, 2010). Realizing this “advocacy” will add a powerful dimension to this demonstration model for academic libraries. Background The Libraries leadership has forged a unique partnership with the board of directors of the Panama Canal Museum (PCM) – “the only museum in the world solely to preserve the history of the American Era of the Panama Canal (1904 1999)” (PCM Board of Directors). In 2009, the PCM board met with leaders of the UF Center for Latin American Studies and the Libraries to discuss a possible merger and transfer of assets. After further exploration, PCM board members approved an integration plan, to take effect some 12 years after the museum’s opening (1998) in a strip mall facility in Seminole, Florida. (Supporting Document: 3)

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 2 The museum’s founders, primarily a group of retired Panama Canal Zone employees, intended to establish and grow a permanent collection of items related to the construction and management of the Panama Canal, capturing a unique period in U.S., Panamanian, and world history. The PCM amassed a permanent collection of more than 12,000 items, largely through the efforts of dedicated volunteers, many of whom are former residents of the Canal Zone now in their 70s and 80s. Formation of the museum arose from the impending return of Canal ownership to the Panamanian people in 1999, and the potential degradation or loss of the Panama Canal heritage for future generations, especially the culture that evolved among some 44,000 residents at the point of transfer. The plan was to begin operations in its temporary location, then conduct fundraising toward construction of a major museum facility. This goal, however, was not achieved. According to PCM President Joe Wood, “…eight years ago, we were told by a museum professional from the American Association of Museums (AAM) that the best way to preserve our unique history would be to partner with an established museum or educational institution…especially in view of a foreseeable and inevitable decline in our membership base” (Wood, 2011). The PCM has operated with a paid executive director and administrative assistance; with the pending closure, the PCM is now volunteer operated. (Supporting Document: 4) In January 2012, an agreement between the PCM and the Libraries to establish the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection at UF was completed, detailing the disposition of assets and joint mission “to document, interpret and articulate the role played by the United States in the history of Panama, with emphasis on the construction, operation, maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and contributions to its success by people of all nationalities who contributed to its success.” The agreement continues, “the mission is of mutual interest to the PCM and the University of Florida and will continue to guide preservation of and access to the collection, as well as support for related research and scholarship.” (Supporting Document: 5) The Libraries will complete accessioning the PCM’s collection prior to closure and subsequent dissolution of PCM’s 501c3 status. PCM collections transferred to date include: 7,000 photos and picture postcards (58%); 2,500 assorted non paper objects, from paintings to pennants, badges to bottles and caps to cups, and objects of daily life in the Zone community (21%); 1,200 memos, letters, reports, scrapbooks, and booklets (10%); 400 maps, posters, and blueprints (3%); 1,100 molas (indigenous Panamanian textile art) (9%); plus 1,677 monographs, 81 serials, 192 yearbooks, and 9 linear feet of unprocessed documents. Also, 475 government documents were sent to the Internet Archive (IA) for digitization. I. Statement of Need This project aligns closely with IMLS Strategic Plan Goal 2 and its objectives: “Promote museums and libraries as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality.” It also aligns with IMLS goals related to placing learners at the center through facilitating library and museum partnerships, practicing exemplary stewardship, and using technology for discovery of the nation’s collections. Factors accelerating action on this project include: The impending closing of the PCM in July 2012 and the need to transfer and integrate its collections, preparation for and celebration of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal in 2014, and the age demographic of the extended PCM community of laypersons/constituents who are primary sources for this cultural heritage. With regard to this community dimension, it is important to note that the “membership” of the PCM and its affiliate, the Panama Canal Society (PCS), is restricted to those persons and families who lived, worked or were educated in the Panama Canal Zone area and their descendants. As these “Zonians” age, their ability to contribute directly to stewardship of the collections and the heritage will be increasingly compromised. Two formal needs assessments have been completed for this project. The first, prepared by philanthropy consultant James Donovan (2011), validates the Panama Canal Museum’s continued interest and willingness to participate and invest in a full integration process with the Libraries and UF, and outlines needs and strategies for supporting full integration activities. The second is a study by UF graduate student in Museum Studies Kim Tinnell (2011): A Guide to Processing, Handling, Condition Reporting, Photographing, Storing, Allowing Access to, Exhibiting, and Inventorying the Museum Collection in a Library Setting. This guide was

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 3 developed to help define stewardship needs of PCM’s collections and the challenges posed by accessioning museum objects into a library setting (Supporting Documents: 6 and 7). Identified audiences and corresponding needs fulfilled by the project: (Supporting Document: 2) Libraries/ Archives/Museums and LAM professionals in the US: The ongoing economic recession has created significant, long term financial pressures for the nonprofit sector overall, and museums have suffered as government funding and contributed income has decreased. More than 70% of museums surveyed by AAM (2011) reported moderate (39%) to severe (14%) or very severe (18%) economic challenges. In 2010, government support decreased in 52% of museums, and investment income decreased in 37% of museums (AAM, 2011). In cases where economic pressures endanger a museum’s ability to sustain operations, the option of merging, whether with a museum or a different type of knowledge/heritage stewardship institution, is becoming a viable alternative to closing, particularly as more knowledge, experience, and best practices emerge from the field. AAM’s 2008 re issued document Considerations for AAM Accredited Museums Facing Retrenchment or Downsizing foresaw the need to support the field as the economy shifted to recession. At the same time, leaders of healthy organizations are recognizing that such combinations can also proceed from strength, seeking merger opportunities to leverage financial stability and solid organizational assets to meet current and devise more ambitious missions (Cortez, et al., 2009). But overall, “…information is lacking on merger frequency, (and) outcomes…” (Russell, 2008) even though there is a critical need to stimulate dialogue and inform library leadership about current museum/library mergers and other forms of deep collaboration. AAM collects only anecdotal information on museum closings and on institutions who have communicated that they are engaged in or planning mergers. AAM’s media relations department provided a list of 26 museum closings during 2009 (Dobrzynski, 2009), with a more recent list provided by AAM’s information center summarizing nine museum mergers since the start of the recession in 2008. Further, exploratory merger discussions between institutions are typically confidential, making documentation of this kind of activity almost impossible. As a result, we do not have a helpful inventory or analysis of merger activity, or what due diligence approaches and action strategies have succeeded. There also is evidence that some mergers have failed, and that the institutions involved have parted ways after a period of joint operations. Altogether, these factors contribute to a perception that mergers are a “last resort,” while making it difficult for leaders to learn the inner workings of and be inspired by this business strategy (Jacobs, 2008). Academic Libraries: The field would benefit greatly from well documented merger case studies involving libraries, museums, and archives, especially if they provide transparency and ongoing formal assessment of the merger process itself and the integration of assets, talent, operations, and processes which follows. Equally, examples of public academic libraries accepting collections that may be disbursed due to museum downsizing or closures need documentation. In the known universe of approximately 17,500 U.S. museums (AAM, 2012), the number of these merger events is relatively small, making the current sample size an unreliable source for dialog, research, and planning. The Libraries PCM integration presents an opportunity to develop an in depth case study. In particular, the UF PCM case goes beyond the important transfer and integration of collection assets: It includes integration of the ephemeral but critical asset of the people whose life experiences, culture, skills, expertise, and passion for the Panama Canal are central to this heritage. Managing (and supporting) a large corps of active and potential volunteers (potentially some 800 PCM and 3,000 Panama Canal Society members) is certainly atypical for academic libraries. But the member volunteer energies involved, for the interpretation of collection materials and for providing educational outreach programs to communities, are critical to project success. Therefore, the project will strive to preserve and extend relationships with PCM’s current stakeholders and constituents, who are now geographically dispersed around the U.S. as well as in Panama. To fully integrate PCM within the Libraries and the greater UF community, project leaders will pursue an asset based

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 4 community development model as codified by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). This model outlines a multitude of benefits and increased capacities for actualizing organizational missions through asset identification, mapping, and leveraging for all participating institutions. The result will help assure continuity and a sense of ownership for PCM and PCS members by their participation in oral histories, collaborative metadata creation, tagging of collection materials, fund development activities, and educational outreach opportunities. Separately, there is a need to inform the broader public about the project, the import of its goals, and the solid stewardship of UF in order to sustain the collection and its programming for the benefit of future generations. It is critical to build credibility with current and future donors of funds, and, as important, donors of new collections through the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection (FPCC) at UF. “Donors worry about the financial health of ‘rescuers’ (and) want to ensure collections are maintained, kept intact and used for their original intent” (Banjo, 2010). The presence of the Panama Canal Collection at UF has already begun to attract additional financial support (over $100,000 in 2011). In some cases these new funds came from donors who were long term supporters of the PCM and want to continue to see the PCM collections grow. In other cases, donors are individuals who see the PCM’s selection of UF as an integration partner as a source of long term confidence that this heritage will be preserved and accessible, helping them consider the deposit of their private Panama Canal collections.Scholars, researchers, teachers, students, and general audiences seeking to have access to primary resources about Panama Canal history: Historically, the PCM attracted, on average, only about 30 research inquiries per year and its collection was largely inaccessible except for items that had been exhibited since 2002 at the museum site in Seminole, Florida. As the accessioning body, the Libraries have committed to expanding access to and interpreting this collection to engage new generations in understanding the significance and lessons of the Panama Canal. The Libraries are noted for the extraordinary Latin American Collection (LAC), which contains over 551,000 items (including monographs, volumes, microfilm, historical documents, maps/atlases, and digital materials) and receives some 9,000 visitors per annum. The LAC supports UF’s Title VI Center for Latin American Studies the second largest program in the country, which draws on the expertise of over 150 distinguished faculty affiliates from across UF. The LAC is a major contributor to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) which is hosted by the Libraries, and features the Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library. As part of its traditional focus on Latin America, the Libraries had long given special attention to Panama, including over 2,200 titles related specifically to Panama in the LAC, and two relatively smaller historical collections related to the period of the construction of the Panama Canal: the Leonard Carpenter Panama Canal Collection and the Laura Mabel Brooking Collection These materials with those from the PCM (2,245 items) make up dLOC’s Panama and the Canal digital collection which received 714,674 item views during 2011. The inclusion of the PCM collection will expand the LAC’s Panama materials to over 12,000 assets, and enable the LAC to document the entire period of U.S. involvement in the Canal (1904 1999). Over the course of two years, 20 graduate students in UF’s Museum Studies program will intern with the PCM and support preparation exhibits for the centennial celebration in 2014. Anticipated users of the PCM collection at UF and related materials include faculty, students, and outside scholars from a number of fields, including Anthropology, Art, Business, Economics, Engineering, International Relations, Sociology, and History. In addition, the finding aids and dissemination activities included in this project will address the need for other extant Panama Canal historical archives to be aware of and access these materials (Supporting Document: 8). Three quarters of the collection consists of photographs or artifacts with minimal documentation or metadata as they were assembled by former Zone residents and their descendants from their own private holdings. This makes participation by the PCM’s expert volunteers in the processing of the collection especially critical. As discussed by Dilevko and Gottlieb (2004), linking the acquisition of objects from community members to a related event (here, the collections integration and processing and the centennial celebration) is a key strategy by which, "the library is also establishing a

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 5 meaningful relationship with its user community that reflects community interests and connects these interests to the library collection." The centennial celebration of the Panama Canal opening has standing well beyond being a milestone in the integration of the PCM at the Libraries: it should act as an important catalyst for the contribution of new stewardship energies by the PCM community. 2. Impact As noted earlier, this project represents the first known effort to fully integrate a small museum’s collections and programming within a public academic library context, with the unique dimension of integrating the extended PCM community and its stewardship energies directly into the effort. The demonstration model, disseminated through a white paper and Association for Research Libraries (ARL) “Spec Kit” (survey results and documentation from member institutions to provide resource guides), among other outlets resulting from this project, will document the strategies employed, the expertise convened, and the networks of institutional collaboration utilized in this merger and centennial celebration (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, 2008). The project’s evaluation process will document not only the organizational issues of merging, and asset and systems management strategies and challenges, but also the more intimate social, cultural, and human dimensions of the integration experience. (Supporting Document: 9) The white paper also will inform two national virtual dialogues, journal articles, presentations at conferences, the first ARL Spec Kit on the topic of mergers, a project final report, and other deliverables. As described by Reed and Dowd (2009), the community driven nature of nonprofit organizations makes traditional quantitative and impact based measurements difficult. To address this scenario and ensure full accountability in the demonstration model, the evaluation designed for this project draws widely on the principles of Fourth Generation Evaluation (Lincoln and Guba, 1989), which takes into account the multiple and complex voices in any organizational environment. The evaluator will take the role of trusted messenger, and will act independently of the project team leaders and advisory board to collect critical feedback from all involved parties (PCM, volunteers, curatorial team, project partners, and other participants). This evaluation feedback will be used to inform and strengthen the ongoing implementation of the project, as well as provide evidence of impact and accountability in final reporting. In this ‘interactive’ evaluation model (Owen, 2007), the evaluator will determine questions and information relevancy in a collaborative fashion in conversation with project participants, and work with Libraries staff as needed to support larger scale evaluation activities (e.g., surveys). All formal interview and survey instruments will be piloted, and all resulting data and interpretations will be verified with respondents. The evaluation will be conducted under the auspices of UF’s Institutional Review Board, maintaining required confidentiality protocols. Evaluation activities include the following: The integration of museum/library entities. Through observation of meetings and activities and interviews with team leaders, the evaluator will analyze the nature of integration of merged collections and programs, the benefits and liabilities associated with the merger from the standpoint of UF and PCM, and the satisfaction of involved participants. Leveraging of lay expertise within an academic library setting. Through interviews and focus groups with PCM members, and observations of key meetings and activities, the evaluator will examine their level of engagement in the pre and post merger process and the PCM members’ sense of ownership. Funding, governance structures, and branding for project success and sustainability. The evaluator will verify deliverables and outputs (including financial accounts, meeting minutes, and digital objects) to ensure project projections of funding, governance structures, and communication tools. These outputs will be used to elicit precise, grounded feedback during focus groups with various participant groups to determine whether these retain the vision different parties intend for the project as a whole. Significant scholarly and public interest and awareness in the history of the Panama Canal Zone. During the grant period, the evaluator will quantify attendance at centennial and educational events (using gate

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 6 counts), online use of digital materials (using automated UF collection visitation software), press and other coverage of the centennial celebration and museum collection re launch (using Google alerts and internet search tools), related scholarly publications (through citation search tools), and complimentary educational and program materials produced for local audiences, schools, and community groups. During centennial activities, a randomized survey will be used to collect audience feedback, to be complemented by ongoing textual analysis of related correspondence received (in any form). 3. Project Design The project will bring librarians, museum experts and curators, scholars, collaborating institutions, Zonians, and broader community members together on a range of activities from collection development to community programming to education and curriculum support. (Supporting Document: 11)Pre Grant Period Inventory, Accessioning and Planning The 24 month planning phase now underway and funded jointly by the Libraries and PCM has completed the following: negotiation of integration and loan agreements, collection transfer and inventory, initiation of examination and conservation of items, review of potential exhibit materials, establishment of advisory and Friends boards, and initiation of fundraising activities and networks established with program partners. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Record Administration, Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), and Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam began an international dialogue to discuss collaborative and mutually beneficial steps. (see Schedule of Completion) Pre grant period planning goals included establishment of permanent endowments to support processing and digitization of Panama Canal collections; utilization of a panel of international experts to advise concerning the centennial celebration; creation of the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection and cultivation of knowledgeable PCM members to add metadata to digital records and share experiences through presentations and information dissemination; continuance of the PCM’s “Museum in a Trunk” program to K 12 schools; solicitation of new collection items; and support of all fundraising activities. (Supporting Document: 10) IMLS Grant Period Project Activities (tracked in the Schedule of Completion by alphabetic identifier) (A) Governance, Advisory Board, Library Leadership Board, project team planning and review meetings: A regular review cycle will assure oversight and continuity of project elements across activities below. (B) Asset inventory/mapping and community cultivation: An ongoing asset inventory will become a core activity for capturing and using the full complement of resources available to support increased discovery and knowledge about Panama Canal history, and involve the newly formed Friends of the PCM Collection, the Panama Canal Society (PCS), other UF participating entities, many of the 26 national and international partners in dLOC, and many others. Cultivation of the PCM and PCM memberships will utilize a broad range of strategies from governance roles to volunteer recognition, to visitation programs, and to centennial programming and speaker bureaus. (C) Oral histories : Oral History Program students will continue to capture, process, and transcribe oral histories of former Zonians (example at: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100381/00001/ ). Some portions of these oral histories will be used within a variety of the centennial and online exhibits. (D) Professional development internships: Twenty UF Museum Studies students/interns (10 each in 2012 2013 and 2013 14) will process and organize PCM collection items and assist with database inventory. Spring classes of graduate students will help to plan exhibits beginning two years prior to the centennial – reviewing items for display, working on the flow and logic for the exhibits, physically creating signage, labels, and brochures, and assisting in the design of digital and online content presentation. (E) Collection integration and stewardship: Processing of the collection will be coordinated through utilization of existing staff from library departments including Gifts and Exchange, Conservation and Preservation, Cataloging and Metadata, Government Documents, and Digital Services in conjunction with the Latin

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 7 American subject specialists. The Libraries will draw upon expertise from all advisors to build the collection, including the National Archives and Record Administration and the Library of Congress. (E1) Preservation and digitization of materials: Materials in brittle physical condition or which require special handling will be digitized at the Digital Library Center (DLC). Books, government documents, and text items that are generally in good condition will be outsourced through the Internet Archive and other service bureaus). As the transfer of collections and materials continues, many items from the Panama Canal Museum will, in the future, find their way to new users online. (E2) Digital resources and exhibits: As exhibit content is digitized and historical information is recorded for web presentation, partnerships with other libraries and museums will increase online access to historical resources. dLOC will continue to acquire and make globally accessible new resources related to Panama and the Canal. Materials will be digitized in libraries and museums, both for preservation purposes and to enable remote access to patrons in place of or in addition to in person visits. (E3) Center of Excellence for government documents: The Libraries have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Association of Southeast Research Libraries (ASERL) to serve as the Center of Excellence for federal documents related to the Panama Canal that will benefit the Federal Depository Library Program, its participants, and the global community. Efforts will continue to collect, organize, and provide broad public access to legacy government documents related to the Panama Canal, including technical reports, maps, and engineering plans from 1856 through 1999, many of which will be full text searchable. The partnership agreement outlines responsibilities for maintaining public access to the digital collection. Included in the project is access to the Panama Canal Commission (PCC) and its predecessor, the Isthmian Canal Commission (ICC), as well as all Federal and officially related publications from the Canal. (F) Centennial events, exhibits and lectures: Joint exhibits of information and artifacts are planned for the 100th anniversary celebration. 1) Exhibits will be presented at FLMNH displaying paleontological specimens excavated from the current expansion of the Canal (prior to its expected flooding for maritime passage in late 2014). The FLNMH received a $3.2 million award from the National Science Foundation for students and faculty to “advance knowledge of the extinct faunas and floras of the ancient Neotropics based on the new fossil discoveries along the Canal” through biological, paleontological, and geological outreach and research (Florida Museum of Natural History, 2010). A companion exhibit highlighting natural history objects from the PCM collections will complement these fossil discoveries. 2) An exhibit of Kuna Indian molas is planned with the Harn Museum, accompanied by a lecture from renowned expert and author, Edith Crouch. There are over 1,500 molas in the transferred collection, many of which were collected during the years from 1940 1980. 3) Other exhibits coinciding with the centennial year will be presented in the College of Engineering (construction of the Canal), the School of Business (world trade), the School of Health Science (history of medicine), and the Libraries (diversity in work and life). A number of seminars and panel discussions will populate campus during the centennial year, with the Center for Latin American Studies annual seminar highlighting Panama. (G) K 12 curriculum support: The College of Education Library will coordinate the writing of lesson plans to supplement and support centennial exhibits, coordinating with the requirements of the Florida comprehensive assessment test. These lesson plans will focus on arts, history, geography, science, and engineering. The PCM created a “Museum in a Trunk” program incorporating music, art ( molas ), history, and lesson plans; the new Friends body will focus on continuing the program and augmenting the information in the trunks with school presentations (already available on campus for school use within Alachua County). The Center for Latin American Studies currently coordinates the trunk loan program. (H) Professional/scholarly communications: PIs, UF staff, advisory group members, and experts will pursue opportunities to speak, participate on panels, present posters, etc. at a range of professional meeting in the libraries, archives, public humanities, and museum fields, as well as publish, blog, etc. in areas of museum stewardship With the counsel of the museum experts team, the UF Director of the Graduate Program in Museum Studies, and the FLMNH and Harn Museum, publications will document best practices in collection

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 8 stewardship, programming, and digitization (e.g., Master’s Thesis by Kim Tinnell); nonprofit merger and governance; and multi type institution collaboration strategies. (H1) Two national virtual dialogs: Using a web conferencing system (e.g., Go To Meeting) the Libraries will convene and facilitate two sessions related to mergers and deep collaboration between museums and libraries. In preparation, participants will receive a preliminary draft of the project’s white paper. The agenda will be developed by the museum/library experts team and focus on challenges and solutions during the project, incorporating other examples from the library/museum fields. 4. Project Resources: Personnel, Time, and Budget/Management The Libraries requests $499,994 in IMLS funding to support: three temporary positions; PT Communications Assistant, PT Project Assistant, and partial funding for the FPCMC Liaison ($196,141); library/museum expert consultant fees ($40,500), external evaluation ($18,782), and exhibit coordination and digitization staff ($57,577). Additionally, IMLS funds will support Advisory Board convening, honoraria for museum experts/speakers, student workers for digitization and exhibition preparation, travel for related conferences and indirect costs ($186,994). Total UF cost share contribution ($559,038), includes cash contribution from the Office of Research and effort contributions by 22 Libraries’ staff members. Key leadership and human capital resources include the following. (Supporting Documents: 2, 12, 14, 15)Panama Canal Centennial Advisory Board: This board will continue planning activities related to programs and events presented by the Libraries, partners, and participants in 2014 15. Board members will serve additional roles as guest lecturers, exhibit researchers, and conduits to FPCMC, PCS, and museum groups. Members include: Patrice Brown, senior archivist in Transportation and Panama Canal records with the Evaluation and Special Projects Division of the National Declassification Center at National Archives and Records Administration. Ronald de Heer, guest conservator for the Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), worked on the design and construction of the museum’s major Panama Canal exhibition. Julie Greene, Ph.D Professor of History at the University of Maryland is the author most recently of The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal Douglas S. Jones, Ph.D., director, professor, and paleontologist at FLMNH, has been working on understanding fossils resulting from the current Canal Expansion Project. Aims McGuinness, Ph.D., author of Path of Empire: Panama and the California Gold Rush and curator of the 2010 Smithsonian exhibition, "Panamanian Passages/Pasajes Panameos." Paul W. Morgan, Ph.D., historian, completed his dissertation, The Role of North American Women in U.S. Cultural Chauvinism in the Panama Canal Zone. 1904 1945, at Florida State University, and trustee of the PCM. Paul S. Sutter, Ph.D., historian, published articles/book chapters on the subject – e.g., “Nature’s Agents or Agents of Empire? Entomological Workers and Environmental Change during the Construction of the Panama Canal." Frank Townsend, Ph.D., UF professor emeritus, Civil Engineering, and “Zonian” was born and raised in the Zone; both grandfathers received Roosevelt Medals. Joseph J. Wood, the PCM president and founding member; former director, Office of Executive Administration and Chief, Administrative Services Division; deputy executive secretary of the Canal Zone, Panama Canal Commission. Other Speakers: Keynote Speaker (TBD) has been invited to take part in the centennial celebration. The anticipated speaker has performed extensive research on the Canal and is a widely respected author (pending formal confirmation). Edith Read Barkowitz Crouch author and Zonian has published The Mola: Traditional Kuna Textile Art Role: Harn Museum; book signing and reception host. Museum Experts Team and Evaluator: David R. Curry, MSLS, Managing Principal, davidrcurryAssociates; Advisory Board, Center for the Future of

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 9 Museums, AAM. Role : Strategy consultant. Wit Ostrenko, president, Museum of Science and Industry in Tampa (5th largest science center and largest children’s science center in the US). Role : Museum advisor. Glenn Willumson, Ph.D., director of UF’s Museums Studies Graduate Program. Role : Museum advisor. Sophia Krzys Acord Ph.D., sociologist and associate director of UF’s Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Role : External evaluator.Samuel Proctor Oral History Program: Paul Ortiz, Ph.D., director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, has overseen completion of some 50 oral history interviews; and each summer, leads a team of students to conduct interviews with PCS members.Smathers Libraries: Judith C. Russell, Principal Investigator, is Dean of University Libraries at UF, a position she has held since 2007, leading eight university libraries, with a $27 million budget and 225 staff. Role: Leader and resource allocator. Rachel A. Schipper, Ph.D., Co Principal Investigator, holds graduate degrees in librarianship, museum studies, education, and computer science. During her years as dean, Schipper designed and coordinated the building of libraries with museum and gallery spaces, often working with donor groups for exhibitions and collections. Role: Coordinator for collection transfer and processing, personnel supervision, and centennial event initiator. Bess de Farber, grants manager, and facilitator. Role: Organizer and facilitator of two virtual national dialogs. Chelsea Dinsmore, international documents librarian, leads the Panama Canal Center of Excellence. Role: Digitization and processing of exhibit materials. John Freund, book and paper conservator. Role: Receive/inventory deliveries, ensure proper storage and document condition, supervise students and volunteers to correct and complete the inventory database. Samuel T. Huang, associate dean of advancement. Role: Corporate and private fund initiation and support. Paul S. Losch, subject specialist in Latin American Studies for the Latin American Collection. Role: Research, event and exhibit support; student supervision. Randall Renner, DLC operation and digital projects manager. Role: Digitization and student supervision. Lourdes Santamara Wheeler, exhibits coordinator (new position as of January 2012), previously the museum and special projects coordinator in the DLC. Role: Exhibit preparation/fabrication/digitization; liaison with Museum partners; Museum Studies student coordinator. Nina Stoyan Rosenzweig, Health Science Center Libraries archivist and historian. Role: Exhibit research and preparation. Laurie N. Taylor, Ph.D., digital humanities librarian for the UF Digital Collections. Role: Digitization coordination and collection support. 5. Communications Plan UF and its partners will create and widely disseminate information about the activities and outcomes of the project, with all project partners and participants promoting the project to local, national, and international audiences. As leading experts in the Canal historical resources, advisors will effectively and authoritatively promote the project as well. The extensive and growing international network of partnerships and participants in this project also will contribute to promotion. Project activities will be announced on relevant web sites, through a range of social media channels, and in publications of UF and its collaborating institutions (e.g., http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/news http://www.youtube.com/user/UFlibraries and http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/cont ent.php?pid=139813&sid=1194381 ). The Libraries Director of Communications, Barbara Hood, with support from the proposed communications coordinator, will provide professional promotional and marketing services to implement many of the publicity strategies listed above. Project participants also will make presentations at professional conferences and meetings, publish in academic journals, and will lead and contribute to e discussions. Project team members plan to present the project model at conferences and through publication outlets, e.g., Association of College and Research

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 10 Libraries (ACRL), American Library Association (ALA), Florida Association of Museums, AAM, Imagining America, and the Center for the Future of Museums. UF will create and maintain an online library finding aid (LibGuide), which includes documentation and descriptive information about the project, as well as a means for contributed comments. This online project site will inventory and include papers and presentations developed by project personnel. A publicly accessible white paper (hosted in the UF Institutional Repository ) and IMLS final report/evaluation results also will share results. An ARL Spec Kit will be developed by those who have participated in the grant experience including the evaluation results, identifying best practices for the merger of museums and libraries and the cultivation of the communities that serve their collections. For the convening of two virtual national dialogs, the Libraries plan to promote these sessions via AAM, FAM, ASERL, FLA, and a variety of listservs with subscribers who are likely to participate. To increase discovery of and access to Panama Canal Zone resources, UF will contribute digital objects and metadata to digital repositories and collections. UF digital collections are automatically disseminated via OAI and MARCXML feeds to multiple harvesters and repositories including: Trove, NINES, 18thConnect, WorldCat, OAIster, and other aggregators. Collections are optimized for Google harvesting. 6. Sustainability In early 2012, a permanent change was made in the Libraries’ governance structure with the appointment of two members of the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection (FPCC), the newly formed membership entity for PCM members to the Library Leadership Board. This action, the first of its kind for a held collection at UF, confirms the Libraries’ long term commitment to its full and active integration into the Libraries. The FPCC and the Library Leadership Board will continue to fundraise; support events, presentations, and outreach (performed by staff and volunteers); as well as seek funding to support the current collection and seek new Panama Canal collections. (Supporting Document: 13) To date, four funds have been established at the UF Foundation with stated goals including the digitization, preservation, and processing of PCM collections; planning and programming for traveling and online exhibits; hosting events including those associated with the Centennial; acquisitions of related materials to enhance the collection; printing, press releases, and the continued promotion of the PCM integration with UF; and other related activities. At the time of submission, these funds totaled $115,709, including $102,698 in an endowment. The Libraries development team has set a target goal of $1.5 million for these funds, and will engage in ongoing fundraising activities to provide the resource for the purposes described in the funds. Libraries permanent staff will provide infrastructure support in a variety of ways, including updating websites and LibGuides for the Panama Canal Collection. The Director of Communication will promote the collection through newsletters, web site announcements, collaboration with partners during annually established events such as Hispanic Heritage Month, and the support of exhibits, presentations, and materials for the annual Panama Canal Society Reunion. Beyond the year of the centennial, international relationships will broaden, and policies for the exchange and loan of exhibit materials will be established. Volunteers, experts, Latin American Collection librarians, and student assistants will continue to build and make accessible the digital collection via dLOC. As a regional federal depository, the Libraries’ current Center of Excellence partnership with ASERL represents a commitment to retain all government documents related to the Panama Canal in perpetuity. Overall, this merger is driving substantive and permanent change in Libraries operations, exhibits, governance, volunteer management, and campus, national, and international relationships. The planned national virtual dialogs, white paper, ARL spec kit, journal articles, and conference presentations will make important contributions to the field in support of collaborations, including mergers, which preserve endangered collections, extend stewardship models, and leverage the associated knowledge for research, scholarship, and civic advancement.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/01/2012 Through: 09/30/13 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communic. Assist. 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $4,0 72 $4,072.00 $4,072.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $42,521.00 $42,521.00 SUBTOTALS $67,799.00 $108, 704.00 $176,503.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $83,484.00 $3,048. 00 $19,409.20 $22,457.20 30 % of $49,320.00 $5,348. 00 $9,448.00 $14,796.00 31.91 % of $43,700.00 $13,4 35.00 $509.00 $13,943.00 SUBTOTALS $21,831. 00 $29,366.20 $51,196.20 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 SUBTOTALS

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to Orl, FL 2 2 $600.00 $80.00 $680.00 $680.00 SUBTOTALS $6,000.00 $680.00 $6,680.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 SUBTOTALS $2,000.00 $2,000.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $251,379.80 $37, 339.68 $47,123.93 $84,463.61 % of % of SUBTOTALS $37,339. 68 $47,123.93 $84,463.61 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $148,469.68 $187,373.73 $335,843.41 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $148,469.68 $187,373.73 $335,843.41 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $111,130.00 $140,24 9.80 $251,379.80

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/1/2013 Through: 9/30/2014 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communic. Assist. 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $10,8 12 & $4,072 $10,812.00 $4, 072.00 $14,884.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $45,009.00 $45,009.00 SUBTOTALS $81,389.00 $122, 522.00 $203,911.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $94,814.00 $3,048. 00 $22,456.97 $25,504.97 30 % of $54,896.00 $6,182. 00 $10,286.80 $16,468.80 26.01 % of $54,201.00 $13,7 16.00 $382.00 $14,097.00 SUBTOTALS $22,946. 00 $33,125.80 $56,070.80 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 SUBTOTALS

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to Orl, FL 2 2 $600.00 $80.00 $680.00 $680.00 SUBTOTALS $6,000.00 $680.00 $6,680.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 N'l Dredg Mus Model Fab $2,500/model $2,500.00 $2,500.00 SUBTOTALS $2,000.00 $2,500.00 $4,500.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $286,162.13 $42, 280.00 $53,870.48 $96,150.48 % of % of SUBTOTALS $42,280. 00 $53,870.48 $96,150.48 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $168,115.00 $214,197.61 $382,312.61 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $168,115.00 $214,197.61 $382,312.61 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $125,835.00 $160,32 7.13 $286,162.13

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/1/2014 Through: 9/30/2015 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communications As 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $10,8 12 & $4,072 $10,812.00 $4, 072.00 $14,884.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $43,133.00 $43,133.00 SUBTOTALS $78,611.00 $109, 316.00 $187,927.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $83,484.00 $3,048. 00 $19,409.20 $22,457.20 30 % of $49,932.00 $5,348. 00 $9,631.60 $14,979.60 26.09 % of $54,512.00 $13,7 16.00 $508.25 $14,224.25 SUBTOTALS $22,112. 00 $29,549.10 $51,661.10 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 SUBTOTALS

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to ATL, GA 2 5 $960.00 $1,000.00 $1,360.00 $600.00 $1,960.00 SUBTOTALS $7,360.00 $600.00 $7,960.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Keynote Speaker Fee $6,000 presentation es timate $6,000.00 $6,000.00 Speaker Honorarium 2@1250; 1@2500; 4@1000; 1@1200 $7,700.00 $2,500.00 $10,200.00 SUBTOTALS $15,700.00 $2, 500.00 $18,200.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $280,748.05 $46, 127.00 $48,204.34 $94,331.34 % of % of SUBTOTALS $46,127. 00 $48,204.34 $94,331.34 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $183,410.00 $191,669.39 $375,079.39 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $183,410.00 $191,669.39 $375,079.39 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $137,283.00 $143,46 5.05 $280,748.05

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM: Section B, Summary Budget $ IMLS $ Cost Share $ TOTAL COSTS 1. Salaries and Wages $227,799.00 $340,543.00 $568,342.00 2. Fringe Benefits $66,888.00 $92,040.00 $158,928.00 3. Consultant Fees $40,500.00 $4,500.00 $45,000.00 4. Travel $19,360.00 $1,960.00 $21,320.00 5. Supplies and Materials 6. Services 7. Student Support 8. Other Costs $19,700.00 $5,000.00 $24,700.00 TOTAL DIRECT COSTS (1-8) $374,247.00 $444,043.00 $818,290.00 9. Indirect Costs $125,747.00 $114,995.00 $240,742.00 TOTAL COSTS (Direct and Indirect) $499,994.00 $559,038.00 $1,059,032.00 Project Funding for the Entire Grant Period 1. Grant Funds Requested from IMLS $499,994.00 2. Cost Sharing: a. Applicant’s Contribution $559,038.00 b. In-Kind Contribution c. Other Federal Agencies* d. TOTAL COST SHARING $559,038.00 3. TOTAL PROJECT FUNDING (1+2d) $1,059,032.00 Percentage of total project costs requested from IMLS 47 % *If funding has been requested from another federal agency, indicate the agency’s name:

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The Panama Canal Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaBudget Justification Salaries & Wages plus Fringe IMLS request ($253,719): To execute the project successfully IMLS funding for three temporary positions (Supporting Document: P) is requested during the integration phase of merger activities and Centennial events: 1) Friends of the PCM Collection Liaison (TBD) (.43 FTE: $45,150 X 3 years = $58,695) is required to develop and manage a new volunteer program thus integrating the museums volunteer program. 2) The Communications Assistant (TBD) (.50 FTE: $21, 120 X 3 years = $63,360) is required to support development and dissemination of project activities and engage participants/partners. The 3) Project Assistant (TBD) (.50 FTE: $24,695 X 3 years = $74,086) will assist project leaders in monitoring accessions, tracking/reporting project progress, coordinating with project participan ts for meetings, and supporting internal Libraries communication (Note: this position is not a clerical position). Funding for Libraries Exhibit Coordinator, Lourdes Santamaria Wheeler ) is requested as she is integral to the online presence of collections, exhibitions and information related to the project. Fill in behind on her other duties will be performed by student vol unteers, other OPS Digital Library Center (DLC) staff. Libraries Operation & Digital Projects Manager Randall Renner ) is requested to cover costs related to supervision of DLC student workers assigned to the proj ect, and other technical requirements of photography and digitization management. His regular duties will be performed by other DLC staff. OPS personnel IMLS request ($40,968): Sophia Acord, external evaluator will work periodically to capture data and observations during the academic year (10%) and will be compensated during summer months ). Students performing online exhibit digitization ($12/hr X 10hrs/wk + $326 fringe for years 2 and 3 = $12,854) to ensure all materials for physical exhibits and online supplementary exhibits have been digitized and elect ronically preserved. To create eight physical exhibits for centennial programming, supported by K 12 curriculum materials, OPS student personnel ($10.25/hr X 17hrs/wk for years 2 and 3 = $9,332) with support from subject specialists. Salaries & Wages plus Fringe Cost Share ($432,583): The UF Office of Research will contribute funds for the 1) Friends of the PCM Collection Liaison (TBD) position (.57 FTE: $77,805), and 2) OPS student personnel (TBD) for digitizing PCM collection items selected by subject specialists for broad public access ($12/hr X 13hrs/wk +$318 fringe X 3 years = $12,532). Additionally, these Libraries personnel will contribute effort: Judith Russell, dean of University Libraries and project PI will ensure project completion by leading resource allocation for integration for the PCM, and presenting centennial programming, ensuring alignment with partners and participants. Rachel Schipper, Ph.D., associate dean and project co principal investigator will ensure overall man agement of integration, centennial programming, co leading private (non federal) fundraising efforts, and co leading the ARL Spec Kit development with external evaluator. Exhibit Coordinator, Santamaria Wheeler will contribute effort for increased web related information management duties in year 2 Steve Carrico, chair, acquisitions will supervise Gifts & Exchange unit and delivery/processing of donations. Bess de Farber, grants manager, will organize and facilitate 2 national virtual dialogs in 2014 and 2015 with museum expert team and project staff (Curr y, Ostrenko and Willumson) and support development of fundraising for private (non federal) sponsors. Chelsea Dinsmore will process government document materials for inclusion in print and digital collections, provide in depth reference service and participate in developing the anticipated 2014 Canal Exhibition. Samuel Huan g, associate dean of advancement will lead development team in private (non federal) fundraising support. Paul Losch, subject specialist, Latin American Collection will receive items transferred, organize collections and process future access ions, plan exhibits, facilitate access to collection, and select materials for digitization. Jimmie Lundgren associate chair, Cataloging/ Metadata, will supervise cataloging personnel processing collection books, maps and government documents. Cathy

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The Panama Canal Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaMartyniak head, preservation department will supervise processing and storage of materials. Carol McAuliffe maps librarian, will provide support related to exhibits and reference. Richard Phillips chair, Latin American Collection, will facilitate the promotion of campus events that include a Latin American component with the Center for Latin American Studies. Jan Swanbeck chair, Government Documents will supervise faculty processing Panama related documents for collection and/or digitization. Laurie Taylor, Ph.D., digital humanities librarian will coordinate digital collection development. Lois Widmer chair, Digital Services and Shared Collections will supervise digitization and storage of materials. John Freund, conservator will inventory deliveries, ensure storage, and document condition/damage, supervise students/volunteers to correct inven tory database. Winston Harris IT senior, will design systems for inventory web applications with Chris Nicolich, IT expert Nina Stoyan Rosenzweig, archivist/historian will develop health sciences exhibit. Mark Sullivan IT Senior, will provide programming and web services for digital collections. Barbara Hood, director of communications will supervise communicatio ns assistant and oversee all promotion activities. Doug Smith head, Copy Cataloging Unit will supervise/catalog Panama related collections. Michelle McClure ElNeil Peter Miller facilities manager will fabricate and deliver exhibit materials, and coordinate van use. Consultant Fees IMLS request : David R. Curry required consulting services to project success, focu sing on integrationstrategies of branding, governance; stewardship, cultivation and support of lay experts, promotion initiatives, and national dialogs on mergers. Cost Share contribution ($4,500): From the UF Office of Research ($1,500/year X 3 years = $4,500). Travel costs IMLS request ($19,360): IMLS designated meeting travel for PI to Washington, D.C. from Gainesville, $2,000/year for 3 years ($6,000). Advisory Group meets 3 times a year, 1 face to face meeting with 4 out of state members from various locations to Orlando for 2 days in July each year, (Greene, Aims, Sutter, Brown), ($1,500/year subsistence costs + $2,500/year transportation = $12,000). AAM conference travel to Atlanta, GA from Gainesville (2 staff X 5 days, subsistence costs is $360 plus $1,000 transportation). Travel costs Cost Share contributi on ($1,960): FLA Conference travel by project staff to Orlando (year 1 and 2) (2 staff for 2 days = $600 for subsistence costs, $80 for mileage = $680 X 2 years = $1,360). AAM conference travel to Atlanta, GA from Gainesville $600 cost share for subsistence described above. Other conference attendance and travel costs will be covered by Libraries annual conference travel funding for project staff. Other Costs IMLS request ($19,700): Museum expert advisor honoraria for Glenn Willumson, Ph.D. and Wit Ostrenko noted author has been invited to present as the centennial keynote speaker. If is unavailable, a similarly noteworthy speaker will be secured ). Centennial speakers have agreed to present for honoraria (inclusive of travel): lecturers will be finalized during trip to Panama in March 2012 Other Costs Cost share contribution ($5,000): Funding from the Office of Research supports Dick Kamsteeg, model fabricator, who created a Panama Canal model requiring assembly in year 2 ($2,500 including travel costs), and Ronald de Heer, guest lecturer Both from the Netherlands. Indirect Costs IMLS Request: ($125,747) : Computed 33.6% of $374,246. Indirect Costs Cost Share contribution: ($114,995): Computed 33.6% of ($342,247) for 3 years salaries, wages and fringe for Libraries cost share personnel described in cost share section above.

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Important Human Achievement University of Florida List of Key Project Staff and Consultants Acord, Sophia K. Brown, Patrice Carrico, Steve Crouch, Edith Read Barkowitz Curry, David R. de Farber, Bess de Heer, Ronald Dinsmore, Chelsea Freund, John Greene, Julie Harris, Winston Hood, Barbara Huang, Sam Jones, Douglas S. Losch, Paul Lundgren, Jimmie Martyniak, Cathy Mcauliffe, Carol McClure-ElNeil, Michelle McGuinness, Aims Miller, Peter Morgan, Paul Nicolich, Chris Ortiz, Paul Ostrenko, Wit Phillips, Richard Renner, Randall Russell, Judith Santamaria-Wheeler, Lourdes Schipper, Rachel Smith, Doug Stoyan-Rosenzweig, Nina Sullivan, Mark Sutter, Paul Swanbeck, Janet Taylor, Laurie Townsend, Frank C. Widmer, Lois Willumson, Glenn G. Wood, Joe

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Project Advisory Board Member Patrice Brown 8601 Adelphi Road College Park Md. (301) 837-0599 patrice.brown@nara.gov Education Masters of Arts American Studies, 1976 George Washington University Washington, D.C. Bachelors of Arts History, 1973 Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross Washington, D.C. Honor : Inducted into Phi Gamma Mu Association Memberships € MARAC (Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference (have served as Secretary) € Society for History in the Federal Government € National Archives Assembly (have served as Secretary; have served on the Nominations Committee; currently Archivist/Historian) Professional Experience € Senior Archivist, Subject Matter Specialist in Transportation/Panama Canal records at the National Archives (NARA). € Worked with the Panama Canal records at the National Archives since 1976. Acquired knowledge of the holdings of the records in th e National Archives in Washington, D.C. as well as Suitland and the record center around the country. Also, became familiar with the holdings of the Library of Congress concerning the Panama Canal. € Worked with the National Archives and the offi cials on the Canal Zone to transfer federal records of permanent value to the National Ar chives. This covered planning, coordinating, and completing the paperwork to transfer both the legal and physical custody of the records to the National Archives. € Described and arranged the majority of Panama Canal records in the custody of the National Archives. (Approximately 1500 cubic ft.) € Assisted researchers, records ma nagers, NARA staff, and the general public with inquiries (written, on phone, in person) dealin g with the Panama Canal/Canal Zone. € Wrote article entitled, “The Panama Canal: Th e African American Experience” that appeared in the 1997 Summer Issue of Prologue. € Made a presentation at MARAC (Mid-Atlanti c Regional Archives Conference) to fellow archivist and historians at the fall 2001 Conf erence on the transfer of permanent records from the Canal Zone to the National Archives. € Presented a paper at the National Archives to the staff and general public concerning the transfer of permanent Panama Canal records from the Canal Zone authorities to the National Archives as part of Archives Week celebration. (2000)

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€ Gave a talk to the National Archives staff and the general public concerning the AfroAmerican employees on the Canal Zone. (2006) € Gave a talk to the National Archives staff and the general public concerning transiting the Panama Canal for Maritime History Month. (2006)

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer JULIE GREENE University of Maryland W: 301-405-4267 Department of History H: 301-328-5803 2115 Francis Scott Key Hall F: 301-314-9399 College Park, MD 20742 jmg@umd.edu ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE Professor, University of Maryland, 2010Associate Professor, University of Maryland, 2007-2010 Associate Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1999-2008 Assistant Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1994-1999 Assistant Professor, University of Missouri at Kansas City, 1990-1993 Visiting Lecturer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1989–1990 HONORS Awards James A. Rawley Prize, awarde d by the Organization of Americ an Historians for the best book published on the history of race relations, 2009, for The Canal Builders: Making America’s Empire at the Panama Canal Award for Excellence in Service, Boul der Faculty Assembly, U-Colorado, 2003 Fellowships and Grants Travel Grant, U-Colorado Graduate Council, for research in London, 2006 National Endowment for the Hu manities Fellowship, 2004-2005 Travel Grant, U-Colorado Graduate Council, for research in Panam, 2002 American Council for Learned Societies Fellowship, 2000-2001 National Humanities Center Fellowship, Triang le Research Park, North Carolina, 2000-2001 (declined) National Endowment for th e Humanities Fellowship, 1993–94 Research Fellowship, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1991–1992 Josephine De Karman Fellowship, 1988–1989 American Historical Associ ation Beveridge Grant, 1988 Yale University Fellowship, 1982 to 1986 Power Foundation Scholarship for New Hall College, Cambridge Univ., 1980-82 EDUCATION Yale University History Ph.D. 1990 History M.A., M.Phil 1986 New Hall College, History M.A. 1987 Cambridge University History B.A. 1982 University of Michigan History B.A. with honors 1980

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PUBLICATIONS Books The Canal Builders: Making America’ s Empire at the Panama Canal (Feb. 2009, The Penguin Press, History of American Life Series) Pure and Simple Politics: The Americ an Federation of Labor and Political Activism, 1881 to 1917, Cambridge University Press, 1998 Co-Editor with Eric Arnesen and Bruce Laurie, Labor Histories: Class, Politics, and the Diversity of the American Working-Class Experience University of Illinois Press, 1998 Articles and Review Essays “The Labor of Empire: Recent Scholarship on U.S. History and Imperialism,” in Labor: Studies in Working-Cl ass History of the Americas 1 (2), summer 2004, 113-29 “Spaniards on the Silver Roll: Liminality a nd Labor Troubles in the Panama Canal Zone, 1904-1914,” International Labor and Working-Class History, 66, Fall 2004, 78-98 "Negotiating the State: Frank Wals h and the Transformation of Labor's Political Culture in Progressive America," in Kevin Boyle, ed., American Labor and Politics SUNY Press, 1998 “Dinner-Pail Politics: Employers, Workers, an d Partisan Culture in the Progressive Era,” in Arnesen, Greene, and Laurie, eds., Labor Histories "The Making of Labor's Democr acy: William Jennings Bryan, the American Federation of Labor and Progressive Era Politics," Nebraska History 77 (3 and 4), Fall/Winter 1996, 149-58 “The Strike at the Ballot Box: The Am erican Federation of Labor, Local Labor Leadership, and the Entrance into National Politics, 1906 to 1912,” Labor History 32 (2), Spring 1991, 80–100

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Douglas Jones Florida Museum of Natural History P.O. Box 117800, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 352/273-1902 352/392-8783 (Fax) dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu Professional Preparation B.A. Geology (High Honors); Rutger s University, New Brunswick, NJ; 1974 M.A. Geological & Geophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 1976 Ph.D. Geological & Geophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 1980 Appointments: 1996-present: Director, Florida Mu seum of Natural History (FLMNH) University of Florida (UF) 1994-1996: Chair, Department of Natural Sciences, FLMNH 1989-present: Curator of Inve rtebrate Paleontology, FLMNH Affiliate Professor, Departme nts of Geology and Biology, UF 1985-1989: Associate Curator, FLMNH Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1984-1985: Associate Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1979-1984: Assistant Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1974-1979: Teaching and Research Assistant, Depa rtment of Geological & Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University Publications Five Most Closely Related To Project : M.X. Kirby, D.S. Jones, and B.J. MacFadden. 2008. Lower Miocene stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and its bearing on the Central American Peninsula. PLoS ONE 3(7): e2791. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002791. B.J. MacFadden, P. Higgins, M.T. Clements and D.S. Jones. 2004. Diets, habitat preferences, and niche differentiation of Cenozoic sirenians from Florida: Evid ence from stable isotopes. Paleobiology 30(2): 297324. D.S. Jones and W.D. Allmon. 1999. Plio cene marine temperatures on the west coast of Florida: Estimates from mollusk shell stable isotopes, pp. 243-250. In : J.H. Wrenn, J.-P. Suc and S.A.G. Leroy, eds. The Pliocene: Time of Change. American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologi sts Foundation, Dallas. D.S. Jones, L.W. Ward, P.A. Mueller, and D.A. H odell. 1998. Age of marine mollusks from the lower Miocene Pollack Farm Site, Delaware, determined by 87Sr/86Sr geochronology, pp. 21-25. In : R.N. Benson, ed. Geology and Paleontology of the Lower Miocene Pollack Farm Fossil Site, Delaware. Delaware Geological Survey, Special Publication 21, 191p. D.S. Jones. 1998. Isotopic determination of growth and longevity in fossil and modern invertebrates, pp. 3767. In : R.D. Norris and R.M. Corfield, conveners. Isotope Paleobiology and Paleoecology. The Paleontological Society Papers 4, 285p. Publications Five Other Significant Publications: D.S. Jones and S.J. Gould. 1999. Direct measurement of age in fossil Gryphaea : the solution to a classic problem in heterochrony. Paleobiology 25(2): 158-187.

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B.J. MacFadden, J. Labs-Hochstein, I. Quitmyer and D.S. Jones. 2004. Incremental growth and diagenesis of skeletal parts of the lamnoid shark Otodus obliquus from the early Eocene (Ypresian) of Morocco. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimat ology, Palaeoecology 206: 179-192. D.S. Jones, I.R. Quitmyer and C. Fred T. Andrus. 2005. Oxygen isotopic evidence for greater seasonality in Holocene shells of Donax variabilis from Florida. Palaeogeogr., Pa laeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 228: 96-108. I.R. Quitmyer, D.S. Jones and C. Fred T. Andr us. 2005. Seasonal collection of coquina clams ( Donax variabilis Say, 1822) during the Archaic a nd St. Johns Periods in coasta l northeast Florida, pp. 18-28. In : D.E. Bar-Yosef Mayer, ed. Archaeomalacology: Molluscs in Former Environments of Human Behaviour. Oxbow, Oxford, UK. K. Auffenberg, I.R. Quitmyer, J.D. Williams and D.S. Jones. 2006. Non-marine Mollusca, pp. 247-262. In : S.D. Webb, ed. First Floridians and Last Mastodons: The Page-Ladson Site on the Aucilla River. Springer, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Synergistic Activities: Natural Science Collection Alliance, Board of Directors (2003-2009), advocacy at a national level for the scientific and cultural importance of natural history collections Association of Science Museum Di rectors, Vice-President (2007-presen t), plan annual conferences and advocate for the significance of natural science collections Florida Association of Museums, Boar d of Directors Treasurer, Presiden t and Past Presid ent (2000-present), organize annual symposia regarding the importance of sc ience learning in informal settings and the roles of museums and science centers in STEM enhancement Founded Center for Informal Science Education at the Florida Museum of Natural History and appointed the first Director, Dr. Betty Dunckel Participant in UF-FLMNH initiative to internationaliz e graduate curriculum, institutionalize professional masters degree, and develop non-traditional STEM gra duate degree track emphasizing broader impacts of science on society Collaborators and Other Affiliations: Within The Last 48 Months: Fred Andrus (Alabama), Chester De Pratter (South Carolina), Linda Ivany (Syracuse), Michael Kirby (C onnecticut), Kristin Teusch (Cornell), Da vid Hurst Thomas (American Museum of Natural History), John Wehmiller (Delaw are), Bruce Wilkinson (Syracuse) Graduate Advisors: Alfred G. Fischer, Ida Thompson, and Franklyn B. Van Houten (all retired) Thesis Advisor and Postgraduate-Scholar Sponsor (Total =22 ): Nicole Cannarozzzi (Florida), Dana Ehret (Florida), Larisa DeSantis Grawe (Vande rbilt), Catalina Pimiento (Smithsonian)

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Aims McGuinness Office: Home: Dept. of History 2825 N. Farwell Ave. U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI 53211 P.O. Box 413 Tel: 414-229-4227 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413 Tel: 414-229-4227 Fax: 414-229-2435 E-mail: smia@uwm.edu Education University of Michigan Ph.D. in History 2001 Dissertation: “In the Path of Empire: Land, Labor, and Liberty in Panama during the California Gold Rush, 1848-1860” Princeton University A.B. in History June 1990 Graduated summa cum laude with a certificate in European Cultural Studies Teaching and Professional Experience Associate Professor, Dept. of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Summer 2007-present Curator, “Panamanian Passages/Pasajes Paname os.” Smithsonian Institution, October 2010-May 2011. A bilingual (English/Spanish) exhibition covering 4 million year s of the history of the Isthmus of Panama. Exhibition co-sponsored by the Smithsonian Latino Center Smithsonian Latino Center, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and the Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam. Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Fall 2001—present Graduate Student Instructor, Dept. of History, University of Michigan Spring 2001, Fall 2000, Spring 1995, Fall 1995 Profesor Invitado, Universidad de Yucatn (Mxico) January-July 1992 and January-July 1993 Selected Fellowships, Grants, and Awards UWM Research in the Humanities Award. UWM. Fall 2009.

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Graduate School Research Committee Award. UWM. $10,600.00. Morris Fromkin Research Grant and Lectureship (with Prof. Jasmine Alinder, History). $5,000. UWM Golda Meir Library. Fall 2004. Huntington Fellowship. $6,000. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA. Spring 2003. W. M. Keck Foundation Fellowship. $4,600. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA. Spring 2003. Fulbright Scholarship for dissertation research in Panama and Colombia. 1997-1998. Phi Beta Kappa. Princeton University. 1990. Selected Publications Book McGuinness, Aims. Path of Empire: Latin American Transfor mations and the California Gold Rush, 1848-1856 Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008. Edited Book Scott, Rebecca J., Thomas C. Holt, Frederick Cooper, and Aims McGuinness, eds. Societies after Slavery: A Select Annotated Bibliography of Printed Sources on the Britis h West Indies, South Africa, British Colonial Africa, Cuba, and Brazil. Pittsburgh: University of Pitts burgh Press, 2002. Paperback edition, 2003. Articles and Book Chapters McGuinness, Aims. “Sovereignty on the Isthmus: Federalis m, U.S. Empire, and the Struggle for panama during the California Gold Rush.” In The State of Sovereignty: Territories, Laws, Populations edited by Douglas Howland and Luise White. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2009. McGuinness, Aims. “La llegada del fantasma: la reti rada de William Walker por Panam y las races del imperialismo estadounidense en Amrica Latina.” Boletn de la Asociacin para el Fomento de los Estudios Histricos en Centroamrica 36 (June 2008) [ http://afehc-historia centroamericana.org/index.php?action=fi_aff&id=1934]. McGuinness, Aims. “Aquellos tiempos de California: el Fe rrocarril de Panam y la transformacin de la zona de trnsito durante la Fiebre del Oro.” [“Those Bygone Days of California: The Panama Railroad and the Gold Rush.”] In Historia General de Panam edited by Alfredo Castillero Calvo, 141-159. Panam: Repblica de Panam, 2004.

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer PAUL W. MORG AN, JR., Ph.D. HIGHER EDUCATION: Attended Canal Zone Junior College, 1962-1963 B.A., Philosophy, Florida State University, 1966 M. Div., Theology, Vanderbilt University, 1970 M.A., Marriage, Family, & Child Co unseling, Azusa-Pacific University, 1982, with clinical internship at the California Family Study Center, Burbank, California (198182), and post-graduate supervision of c linical work at the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas (1982-83) M.A., International Affairs, Florid a State University, 1992 Ph.D., History (U.S./Latin Ameri ca), Florida State University, 2000 WORK EXPERIENCE: Civilian Teaching Experience: 2010-present Instructor, U.S. Hist ory, University of South Florida 2004-2010 Instructor in U.S. History and Undergraduate Academic Advisor, History Department, University of South Florida 2003-2004 Visiting Instructor, U.S. History, Un iversity of South Florida 1995-1997 Teaching Assistant, U.S. and Latin Am erican History (taught survey courses in U.S. and Latin American History and uppe r division course in the history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbe an), Florida State University Military Experience: 1971-1991 (to military reti rement): For twenty years, I was a U.S. Army chaplain and was assigned as a hospita l chaplain, administrative chaplain, marriage and family counseling chaplain, un it chaplain, and as an instru ctor at the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. During this period, I served in Korea, Germany, and on posts throughout the United States. TEACHING AWARDS: University Teaching Excellence Award for Outstandi ng Teaching Assistants, Florida State University, 1996 Thomas Campbell Outstanding Teaching Assistan t Award, History Department, Florida State University, 1996

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HONOR ORGANIZATIONS: Phi Theta Kappa, Canal Zone Junior College (Panama) Phi Kappa Phi, Florida State University Phi Alpha Theta, Florida State University (President, 1996-1997) SCHOLARSHIP AND PUBLICATIONS : “The Working Women of Guadalajara, 1821: Class and Gender Issues on the Eve of Independence.” Urban History Workshop Review Volume 3, Spring 1996: 17-21. “The Role of North American Women in U.S. Cu ltural Chauvinism in the Panama Canal Zone, 19041945.” Ph. D. dissertation, Florida State University, 2000. This unpublished work is cited in Julie Greene, The Canal Builders: Making America' s Empire at the Panama Canal (New York: Penguin Press, 2009) and in Alexander Missal, Seaway to the Future: American Visions and the Construction of the Panama Canal (Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2008) PRESENTATIONS: “The Women of Guadalajara, 1821,” Phi Alpha Theta Conference, University of South Florida, April 1997. VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE: Trustee, Panama Canal Museum Seminole, Florida, 2000-present

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Paul S. Sutter 1414 Zamia Ave, Boulder, CO 80304 303-442-0996 (h); 303-492-6208 (o); 303-492-1868 (fax) Email: paul.sutter@colorado.edu EMPLOYMENT HISTORY University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Associate Professor of History, 2009-present University of Georgia Athens, Georgia Director of Graduate Studies and Instructional Coordinator, 2008-2009 Associate Professor of History, 2004-2009 Assistant Professor of History, 2000-2004 University of Virginia Charlottesville, Virginia Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Technology and the Environment, 1997-2000 EDUCATION University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas – Ph. D. w ith Honors, December 1997. Major Advisor : Donald Worster Hamilton College Clinton, New York – B.A. in American Studies, May 1987. RESEARCH-IN-PROGRESS Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon and Southern Environmental History – This book-length project examines the history of Providence Canyon, which is today a Geor gia State Park. During the 1930 s, the “canyon,” which is the m ost extreme of a series of spectacular erosio n gullies, was commonly represented as the s upreme example of southern soil abuse. Th is short, heavily-illustrated book will examine the representational history of the place and ask what lessons it might provide fo r southern conservation and environmental history. Under contract with the University of Georgia Press. “American Environmental Histor y: The State of the Field,” essay commissioned for the Journal of American History in progress. Pulling the Teeth of the Tropics: Environment, Disease, Race, and the U.S. Sanitary Program in Panama, 1904-1914 – This booklength project examines the relationships between disease, enviro nmental change, racial segregatio n, labor control, and ideas o f tropical nature as they manifest themselves duri ng the U.S. construction of the Panama Canal. SELECTED PU BLICATIONS Books € Driven Wild: How the Fight against Automobiles Launched the Modern Wilderness Movement Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002. € Environmental History and th e American South: A Reader co-edited with Christopher Manganiello. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009. € The Art of Managing Longleaf: A Personal History of the Stoddard-Neel Approach with Leon Neel and Albert G. Way. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2010. Selected Articles, Book Chapters, and Review Essays € “What Gullies Mean: Georgia’s ‘Little Grand Ca nyon’ and Southern Environmental History,” Journal of Southern History 76, 3 (August 2010): 579-616. € “Seeing Beyond Our Borders: U.S. and Non-U.S. H istoriographies,” in Douglas Sackman, editor, A Companion to American Environmental History Malden, Mass: Blackwell Publishin g, 2010: 635-652. (Th is is a revised version of an essay previously published as “What Can U.S. Environmental H istorians Learn from Non-U.S. Environmen tal Historiography?” – see below for full citation).

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€ “When Environmentalisms Collid e: Ramachandra Guha’s The Unquiet Woods and U.S. Environmental History,” Environmental History 14, 3 (July 2009): 54 3-550; originally commissioned as “When Environmentalisms Collide: The Unquiet Woods and U.S. Environmental History,” in Ramachandra Guha, The Unquiet Woods: Ecological Change and Peasant Resistance in the Himalaya Twentieth Anniversary Edition. Delhi, India: Permanent Black, 2009: 233-244. € “No More the Backward Region: Southern Environmental History Comes of Age,” in Paul Sutter and Christopher Manganiello, eds., Environmental History and the American South: A Reader (Athens: University of Geor gia Press, 2009): 1-24. € “Tropical Conquest and the Rise of the Environmental Management State: The Case of U.S. Sanitary Efforts in Panama,” in Alfred McCoy and Francisco Scarano, eds., Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State (Madison: University of Wisconsin Pr ess, 2009): 317-326. € “Knowing Nature Through Labored Breath ing: A Modern History of Allergy,” Reviews in American History 36, 1 (March 2008): 109-117 (review essay on Gregg Mitman’s Breathing Space ). € “Nature’s Agents or Agents of Empire?: Entomological Worker s and Environmental Change duri ng the Construction of the Panama Canal,” Isis 98 (December 2007): 724-754. o Winner of the 2008 Envirotech Article Prize o Winner of the 2009 Alice Hamilton Prize € “Wilderness and the American Machin e,” in George Weurthner, ed., Thrillcraft: The Environmental Consequences of Motorized Recreation Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 2007. € “Putting Wilderness in Cont ext: The Interwar Years, ” in Michael Lewis, ed., American Wilderness: A New History New York: Oxford University Press, 2007: 167-85. € “On ‘Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon,’” Gallery Essay, Environmental History 11, 4 (October 2006): 830-834 € “Control de Zancudos en Panam: Entomlogos y Cambio Ambiental durante la Construccin del Canal,” Historia Critica (JulyDecember 2005): 67-90. (translated by Claudia Leal) € “Origins of the National Wilderness Preserva tion System,” in H. Ken Cordell, John C. Bergstrom, and J. Michael Bowker, eds., The Multiple Values of Wilderness College Station, Penn.: Vent ure Publishing, 2005: 7-21. € “New Deal Conservation: A View from the Wilder ness,” in David Woolner and Henry Henderson, eds., FDR and the Environment New York: Palgrave, 2005: 87-106. € “Driven Wild: The Origins of Wilderness Ad vocacy during the Interwar Years,” in Schullery, P., and S. Stevenson, eds. People and Place: The Human Experience in Greater Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park, Wyo.: Yellowstone Center for Resources, 2005: 217-27. € “Representing th e Resource,” Environmental History 10, 1 (January 2005): 94-96. € “The Environment,” in Stephen J. Whitfield, editor, A Companion to Twentieth-Century America Malden, Mass: Blackwell, 2004: 179-97. € “What Can U.S. Environmental Historians Learn from Non-U.S. Environmental Historiography?” Environmental History 8, 1 (January 2003): 109-129. RECENT AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS 2009 Alice Hamilton Prize given by the American Society for Environmental History for the best environmental history article published outside of Environmental History during the previous year (2008). 2008 Envirotech Article Prize – Awarded to “the best article examining the relationships between technology and the environment published during the last three years (2005-08).” National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Fellowship Summer 2007. Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow Huntington Library, San Marino, CA, Summer 2006. Center for Humanities and Arts Research Fellowship – University of Georgia, 2005-2006. Parks-Heggoy Teaching Award (two-time winner) – Best graduate instructor in the History Department, as voted on by the graduate students, 2002-2003, 2006-2007. EDITORIAL AND ADVISORY POSITIONS Editor, “Environmental History and the Am erican South,” books series published by the University of Georgia Press. Member of the Editorial Board of Isis (History of Science Society), 2010-2012 Member of the Editorial Board of Environmental History (American Society for Environmental History), 2011-2015 Member of the Editorial Board, University of Georgia Press, 2008-2009 Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Wormsloe Institute for Environmental History

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer TOWNSEND, Frank C. ACADEMIC RANK Professor, Emeritus (Retired 2005) Civil Engineering, University of Florida EDUCATION Ph.D. (Civil Engineering) Okla homa State University 1970 MSCE (Civil Engineering) Okla homa State University 1967 BSCE (Civil Engineering) Michigan College of Mining & Technology 1962 RELATED EXPERIENCE 1979-2005 Professor, Dept of Civil Engi neering, University of Florida 1992-1996 Summer IPA Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers 1970-1979 Supervisory Research Civil Engineer (GS-14) Waterways Experiment Station 1966-1970 Graduate Assistant, Ok lahoma State University 1962-1966 First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 8th Special Forces Ft. Gulick, CZ HONORS and AWARDS USUCGER Distinguished Educator Award, 2006 Elected ASCE Fellow, 2002 Byron Spangler Professor of Civil Engineering, 2000-2002 MTU Civil Engineering Academy, 1996 Tau Beta Pi, Outstanding Teacher, 1988-89 Registered Engineer Florida PE (No. 29091) ASTM C.A. Hogentogler Award, 1977, C.B. Dudley Award, 1988 U.S. Army Commendation Medal, 1966 Eagle Scout, BSA, 1958 Refereed Publications (Recent Past Several Years) Elton, D., Shannon, D., Luke, B., Townsend, F., and Roth, M. (2006) “Adding Excitement to Soils: A Geotechnical Student Design Competition,” International Journal of Engineering Education Vol. 22, No. 6, pp. 13251336. Anderson, J. B., and Townsend, F.C. (2005) “Calibration of Constitutive Models for Florida Sands by Drained Triaxial Tests,” ASCE GSP 139 Calibration of Constitutive Models. Townsend, F.C. (2005) “A Legacy of Mike W. O’Neill – Service,” ASCE GSP 129 Advances in Designing and Testing Deep Foundations – In memory of Michael W. O’Neill, p.209. Anderson, J.B., Townsend, F.C., and Horta, E. (2004) “A Brief Study of the Repeatability of In-Situ Tests at the Florida Department of Transportation Deep Foundations Research Site in Orlando, Florida, USA” Proceedings 2nd International Conference on Site Characteri zation, ISC-2, Porto, Portugal Ed. A. Fonseca and P. Mayne, Mill Press, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Townsend, F.C. (2004) “Geotechnical Design Considera tions for Prestressed Concrete Pile Foundations,” Proceedings The PCI Bridge Conference, Atlanta, Ga. Also presented paper.

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Townsend, F.C. (2004), “Challenges Facing Gradua te Education in Geotechnical Engineering,” ASCE G-I GeoStrata Summer Issue. Anderson, J.B., Townsend, F.C., and Grajales, B. (2002) “C ase Histories Evaluation of Laterally Loaded Piles,” Under review ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering August. Anderson J.B. and Townsend, F.C. (2002) “A Laterally Loaded Pile Database,” ASCE GSP 116 Deep Foundations 2002An International Perspective on Theory, Design, Construction, and Performance, Orlando. Anderson, J.B and Townsend, F.C. (2001) “SPT and CPT Testing for Evaluating Lateral Loading of Deep Foundations,” ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering GT Nov., pp. 920-925. Al-Yaqout, A., and Townsend, F.C. (2001) “Str ategy for Landfill Design in Arid Regions,” ASCE Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management Vol. 5, No. 1, Jan. pp. 2-13. SERVICE Graduate Coordinator, Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering, UF, 2001-2005 Chief Advisor, Tau Beta Pi, Fl Alpha Chapter, 1982-2005 Chairman, 5th Int. Conf. on the Application of St ress-Wave Theory to Piles, Orlando, 1996. President, USUCGER, 1994-1995. Chairman, ASCE Soil Properties Committee, 1987-1989. Continuing Education Service UF-DOCE Deep Fdns, Course Di rector, Orlando, October 9, 2001. Instructor NHI 13221 GADot 4/2/01, NYDOT, September 24-28, 2001. Geotechnical Engineering, U-T ecnological de Panama, 1999. PC Geotechnical Software, PR DOT, San Juan, 1995. Geotechnical Engineering, U-T ecnological de Panama, 1995. Quality Geotechnical Lab Testing, Univ Mi ssouri Rolla '84,'86' ,88',90',92,'94,'96,98. Deep Foundations, UF DOCE, Cocoa Beach, FL 93, 95, 96, 97,98,99. Seminario Geotecnia, U-Nacional Medellin, 198 9, & U-Nacional Manizales, 1994,Colombia. Invited Speaker ASCE FL Section St Pete 2001, Key Biscayne 2002. General Reporter, X Panamerican Conf. Soil Me ch and Fdn. Engr., Guadalajara, Mexico, 1995. General Reporter, Centri fuge '94, Singapore, 1994. General Reporter, IX Pan-Am Conf. on Soil Me ch and Fdn. Engr., Vina del Mar, Chile, 1991. General Reporter, VIII Panamerican Conf. Soil M echanics and Fdn Engr, Cartegena, Colombia, 1987.

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Project Advisory Board Member Joseph J. Wood, Jr. 3002 Sawgrass Circle Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel. (850) 668-8936 Email: Pccjoebev@comcast.net Joseph “Joe” Wood was born in Panama, Republic of Pa nama in 1937. He attended US schools in the Panama Canal Zone, graduating from Balboa High School in 1955. He received an A ssociate of Arts degree from the Canal Zone Junior College in 1957, wher e he was elected president of the Freshman and Sophomore classes. He transferred to the University of Fl orida where, in 1959, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with a major in Economics. Following a year of gradua te study at UF, he joined the US Army National Guard in Gainesville and was honorably disc harged upon completion of a six-year Army Reserve commitment. In 1961, Mr. Wood was employed as a Management Intern with the Panama Canal Co mpany (later to become the Panama Canal Commission), an independent agency of the United States Government. He successively held a variety of staff and administrative positions, includi ng Chief, Administrative Services Division, Deputy Executive Secretary of the Canal Zone and Director, O ffice of Executive Administrati on, a position he occupied from 1980 until his retirement in 1993. As Director of the Office of Execu tive Administration, Mr. Wood advised a nd represented the Administrator on policy and administrative matters and served as the principal channel of comm unication between the Canal agency and the American Embassy; the U. S. Forces ; other U. S. Government agencies in Panama; Congressional delegations; the Canal’ s Board of Directors; a nd the Government of Panama. He rendered final agency decisions on all equal oppor tunity, position classification, adve rse action and employee grievance appeals; was the Designated Agency Ethics Officer, the T op Secret and Classified In formation Security Officer and was designated the primary reli ef for the Deputy Administrator. Prior to the implementation of the Panama Canal Treat ies in 1979, which disestablished the Canal Zone and granted Panama jurisdiction over all its territory, Mr. Wood was appointed as the United States representative (co-chairman, with a Panamanian co-chairman appointed by the Panamanian Govern ment) on seven bi-national Treaty Implementation Subcommittees in the following func tional areas; lands, waters and public buildings; tax matters; importations; licensing and registration; empl oyee documentation; commercial activities; and nonprofit organization activities. Following the 1989 U. S. military action in Panama, “O peration Just Cause,” Mr. Wood served as Deputy Administrator for Administration for nine months until such time as the Treaty-mandated Panamanian Administrator and American Deputy Ad ministrator could be appointed by the President of the United States. During his time in Panama, Mr. Wood served as Chairma n, Board of Trustees, Panama Canal College for nine years; President, Canal Zone Council, Boy Scouts of America; Chairman, Committee for Aid to Heart, Cancer and Handicapped Patients; Commissioner and League Presid ent, Panama Pacific Little League; and member of the board, Summit Hills Golf and Country Club. He was recipient of the Panama Ca nal Honorary Public Service Award; th e Panama Canal Master Key to the Locks Award with the designation of “Champion of the Isthmian Community;” the Panama Canal

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Distinguished Service Award; the Boy Scouts of Amer ica Buenas Obras (Good Deeds) Award; the Boy Scouts Distinguished Medal; the Panama Canal College Medal; and numerous performance awards. After his retirement and subsequent move to the United States, he help ed found the Panama Canal Museum in 1998 and became its Founding President, a position which he still occupies. Mr. Wood is an avid golfer and member of the Killearn Go lf and Country Club in Tallahassee; a member of the George A. Smathers Library Leadership Board at the Un iversity of Florida and a me mber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge 1414 in Panama. He is married to the former Beverly Bowman, who was born and raised in the Canal Zone; they have three sons, Cr aig (wife, Heather), Brian (wife Karina) and Scott; and four grandchildren, Jordan, Cameron, Adrian and Asher.

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Guest Lecturer Edith Read Barkowitz Crouch 1317 Braeburn Road Charlotte, North Carolina 28211 704-442-0593 ecrouch@carolina.rr.com Experience: Author 2007 – Present Walker & Gillette, American Architects : From Classicism through Modernism Including the Architectural Wo rk of Joseph Mordecai Hirschman to be published by Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 2013. This book will explore the full creativ e spectrum of architectural work designed and created by Walker & Gillette from the 1900s – 1950s including highlights of Hirschman’s work with the firm. The Mola: Traditional Kuna Textile Art published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., August, 2011. The mola is a multilayered textile art form and metaphor for the story of the Kuna, indigenous people of Panama. With over 890 images covering more than a century of molas, this book provides insights into design sources and influences for molas, perspectives on the aesthetic pr actices of women creating th em, and hints for collecting and preserving this colorful textile art form. The hand-appl iqud art panels tell the ta le of the Kuna women and are symbolic of their artistry, observation, and beliefs. Their lush tropical paradise cultural cosmology, sense of humor, and exposure to foreign elements are represented in these fascinating fabric designs. A brief history of Panama and its rich tradition of indige nous arts place the mola in context. Tiffany Studios’ Techniques: In spiration for Today’s Artists published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., December 2010. This book explores the creative media that ma ster designer Louis Comfor t Tiffany (1848-1933) and his Tiffany Studios in New York pioneered, coupled with rela ted masterpieces that contem porary artists have made. Nine chapters present Tiffany's original paintings and fine arts, stained glass windows and lampshades, mosaics, favrile glass objects, metalwork, enamels, and jewelry. E ach method is explained and superlative examples are shown in 560 color photographs. Related artworks, by 17 contemporary artists, establish how L.C. Tiffany has influenced living artists. All the artw orks were inspired by natural flower s and plant material in Art Nouveau aesthetics. This reference book is a t ool for designers, Tiffany collectors, and everyone who aspires to create their own masterpieces. The Mosaics of Louis Comfort Tiffany published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., December 2008. This is the first book exclusively about L. C. Tiffany's glass mosaic masterpieces, created from 1880 to 1931 at the Tiffany Studios in New York City for clients across the contin ent. The book’s text is combined with over 700 color photographs to showcase Tiffany's magni ficent art. Many of the images are published here for the first time, highlighting over 70 luminous installations in private mansions, public buildings, and churches. Beautifully decorated interiors, mausoleums, and domestic room s are shown along with an explanation of Tiffany's technique of mosaic making and the unique glass he crea ted and used in them. New information identifies the mosaic artists who worked with him. A useful glossary of mosaic and glass terms, chronology of events in L. C. Tiffany's life relating to his mosaic wo rk, and complete listing of the loca tions of his mosaic masterpieces are provided. This book will enthrall lovers of mosaics, student s, and scholars with an inte rest in Tiffany as well as decorative arts and design. Teacher & Glass Artist 1995 Present

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Instructed adults, teachers and school aged students in the techniques of st ained, leaded, fused and mosaic glass production through the Charlotte Meck lenburg County school system, th e Mint Museums and the McColl Center for Visual Art. Developed co mplete curricula for a range of gla ss classes and designed and implemented the establishment of a complete staine d and leaded glass teaching studio. Designed and created custom stained a nd leaded glass windows, doors, lamps, lighting fixtures, and gift items for client’s residences and businesses. Communications Manager, Tampa Electric Company, 1982 – 1997 Managed the Creative Services section of the Cor porate Communications Depa rtment including human resources management and project planning and administration for the phot ography, video, web design, typesetting and graphic design areas. Perf ormed creative design and direction to staff in the production of print publications and video productions. Event planner and organizer for corporate and community functions. Degree: Bachelors of Science, School of Visu al Arts, Florida State University. Personal Note: I spent my childhood in the Panama Canal Zone from shortly after my birth through high school. While attending college in Florida, I traveled frequently to Winter Park's Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art where I became enthralled with the works of Louis Co mfort Tiffany and his talented artisans; the inspiration for my first two books came from this experience. I retu rned to my background in Panama to write about the textile art of the indigenous Kuna; my parent’s love of Panama’s culture and mola collection served as inspiration for the book on molas. The architecture book, currently in progress, was inspired by the design work of my great uncle J.M. Hirschman for Walker & Gillette.

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Museum Experts Team Member David R. Curry David R. Curry is Managing Principal of davidrcurryAssociat es, an intellectual services firm with competencies in nonprofit governance and leadership; knowledge/heritage stewardship and supporting digital strategies; market positioning, brand engineering and reputation management; and policy development and issues management, among other specialties. Prior to forming davidrcurryAsso ciates, David served as Vice President, Corp orate Public Affairs for Unisys Corporation, the global, $6 billion information technology services firm. He was a member of the senior management team for over two decades, during which he led the company’s public affairs fu nction. In this role he led issues management activities; corporate brand, market positioning and identity progra ms; executive, customer, and employee communications; the company's network of corporate and research libraries a nd historical archives; civic development and community relations; philanthropic and sponsorship programs; sale s and marketing development programs, and a range of special corporate initiatives. He directly supported specia l requirements for the Office of The Chairman during four successive Unisys CEOs from 1983 to 2002. In the museums/archives space, David’s work has ranged wide ly. He currently serves on the Advisory Council for Center for the Future of Museums (American Asso ciation of Museums). He recently comple ted nine years of service as a trustee of The Franklin Institute Science Museum (Philadelphia). He led the team in creating the Burroughs Corporation Histor ical Archives in preparation for the company’s centennial celebration in 1984, which he led as organizing chair. This collection of documents, glass slides, photographic and film materials, 3D objects and technology artifacts was eventually donated to the Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing at the University of Minnesota in the 1990s. In 1997, David was recognized by the Board of the Babbage Institute for his “extraordinary contributions” in crea ting one of premier archival resources on the history of the computing industry. David worked with the Smithsonian during the 1990s on two ma jor exhibitions relating to co mputing. The fi rst was with the National Museum of American History’s “Information Age” exhibit which spanned the development and societal impact of computing and communications fr om the 1850s forward. He provided st rategy and conceptu al counsel to the project, and facilitated archival research and other support. He also worked with the Air & Space Museum on its major “Computing in Flight” exhibit and subsequent exhibits that have explored the role of computing technology in flight and in space exploration. He continues active relationships with cu rrent Smithsonian staff on various digitization initiatives. David led formation of and helped manage the collaborati on among Unisys, the University of Pennsylvania and the Greater Philadelphia First Foundation as the organizing institutio ns for the 50th anniversary of ENIAC in 1997. This effort involved a number of regional and national organizations from the civic, academic an d commercial spheres, and culminated with Vice President Al Gore dedicating a permanent exhibit on Penn’s campus. David was a co-leader of the organizing committee and provided leadership to collab oration efforts involving the Smithsonian and many other institutions which touched th e development of the ENIAC and early computin g history. He also provided conceptual counsel on the design of the permanent exhibit. His work with science museums has spanne d the last twenty years, anchored in his work with the Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia. He guided the formatio n of the Corporate Partner program at the Franklin, and facilitated Unisys Corporation’s role as the first partner in the program. He has provided conceptual counsel to a number of exhibit projects during this period. He was instrumental in forging collaboration among twelve science museums in the U.S. and internationally to create the Science Learning Network, an NSF-funded project which explored the meeting point between museum expertise in davidrcurry Associates intellectual precision … supple imagination

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conceiving and building interactive exhibits and the emerging interactive space on the web. The principal science museums or museum organizations in the U.S. included th e Exploratorium/San Francisco, Miami, Boston, Oregon, and Minneapolis. Internationally, the collaborators included Si ngapore, Japan, London, Helsinki, Paris, Mexico, Venezuela and others. The project was honored by UNESCO which awarde d its Diderot Prize to the Science Learning Network for outstanding contributions to the public understanding of science. His work on special historical celebrations included the Burroughs Centennial and ENIAC 50th as above, as well as the 25th anniversary of the Arts Foundation of Michigan, the 50th anniversary of the Friends of the Detroit Public Library, and the 150th anniversary of the Germantown Cricket Club. He conducted archival research, provided strategy and conceptual counsel, planning, program desi gn and execution for these celebrations. David is also a co-founder and Executive Director of the Cent er for Vaccine Ethics and Policy (CVEP), a joint program of the Penn Center for Bioethics, The Wistar Institute Vaccine Center, and the Vaccine Education Center of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. CVEP focuses on ethical and policy issues associated with the full vaccine life cycle from basic discovery and bench science to clinical trials to manufacturin g and market deployment to global public health strategies and immunization campaigns. He became an Associate Fellow of the Center for Bioethics in 2010 and prior to that appointment was a Visiting Scholar at the Penn Center for Bioethics from 2005. David enjoys a strong record of leadership and governance service with nonprofit organizations in the sciences, arts and education sectors. As noted above, he currently serves on the Advisory Council for Center for the Future of Museums (American Association of Museums), and recently completed nine years of service as a trustee of The Franklin Institute Science Museum (Philadelphia). He also serves on the board of the International Literacy Institute/National Center for Adult Literacy of the University of Pennsylvania, and on the Executive Committee of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize Collaborative. He has served on the board of the Philadelphia Committee on City Policy, and as a member of the Executive Committee of The Philadelphia Liberty Medal. Earlier, David served on the board of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the board of Arts Midwest, the seven-state, region al arts service organization involved in a range of arts programming and granting management of National Endowmen t for the Arts and other funds. David served as president of the board of The Arts Foundation of Michigan, as vice president of the board of the Friends of Detroit Public Library, and as chairman of the Michigan Ce nter for the Book (Library of Congress), among others. He is President Emeritus and served on the Board of Governors of the Germantown Cricket Cl ub (Philadelphia, 1854), one of the oldest and most diverse private at hletic and social clubs in the nation. He has been honored by a range of organizations for his governance and leadership service. David earned a B.A. in Philosophy with High Distinction and Phi Beta Kappa from the Honors Program at Wayne University in Detroit, Michigan. He also holds an MS in Information and Library Scienc e from Wayne. He earned a Scientific Honors diploma from the Univ ersity of Detroit Jesuit High School. * *

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Museum Experts Team Member Witold (Wit) Ostrenko (813) 987-6300Museum (813) 841-3270Cell Tampa, Florida 33617 wostrenko@mosi.org Professional Preparation Bachelor of Science, Zoology, Flor ida Atlantic University, December 1969 Master of Science, Aquatic Ecology, University of Miami, May 1978 Doctorate of Philosophy, Oceanography, Nova University, a.b.d. Training in Russian/English scientific translation Professional Associations : Most Recently. President of the international Association of Science and Technology Centers. Washington, D.C. Serving/representing the science center and museum field world wide. Founding Board President of the Florida Association of Museums. Founding Member of FAST (Florida Association of Science & Technology). 1987 to Present Museum of Science & Industry, Tampa, Florida President and CEO of MO SI Science Center, Inc. 1990-present. Responsible for board development, fund raising, longrange and strategic planning. Accumulated and developed $110 million asset including 75-acre site, 318,000 square feet of fac ilities including a) Science Center; b) Whitney An drews Lang Center for Learning; c) IMAX Dome Theatre; d) Children’s Science Center Kids In Charge!; e) Science Library; f) Preschool and Middle-Grade School 560 students; g):The Saunders Planetarium; h) Laboratories, Weather Simulators, and Classrooms. Leads Nature Tours by land, sea, and air. Currently completing $34 million expansion. Completed Kids in Charge!, a 40,000-sq.-ft. children’s science center; Disasterville, a 10,000-sq.-ft. natural hazar ds of the U.S. permanent exhibition; and the Welcome Center bu ilding. In 2010 op ened a 13,000-sq.-ft. health and the human body exhibition, The Amazing You A total of 318,000 in A/C, 436,576 under roof on 74 acres. Completed 15-year Master Plan for 2021. New Energy Center to distribute information world wide on how to utilize alternative and sustainable energy opening 20112015. July 1995 completed Phase 1 of a 15-year master plan. Expansion (200,000 sq. ft) designed by Antoine Predock triples original size to 265,000 square f eet located on 65 acres. The $36 million expansion includes an IMAX Dome Theatre and Living System for water treatment. It contains the nation's first pub lic library, Head Start School, and elementary school-science ce nteruniversity relationship. Has staff of 103, budget of $8.5 million, 600,000 visitors, and 10,000 member households. Director of Museums for Hillsborough County 1987-1995. Responsible for developing the original site into a state-of-theart science center on 47 acres. The 65,000-square-foot facility had a staff of 33, a $3 milli on revenue, 375,000 visitors, and 3,500 members. 1979 to 1987 Historical Museum of Southern Florida, Inc., Miami, Florida Assistant Director/Marketi ng Director 1982-1987 of new 35,000-square-foot history museum in a downtown cultural facility designed by Philip Johnson, which contained both a Fine Arts Cent er and Public Library. Full responsibility for attendance, pu blic relations, membership, and fund-raising efforts (corporations, individuals, deferred giving). Assisted with board development. Active in Chamber of Commerce Corporate Responsibility committee. Education Director 1979-1982. Responsible for fund raising and fiscal planning for education department. Initiated and developed history museum education program including commun ity tours, enrichment classes, outreach activities, museum demonstrations, and volunteer activities. Designed educational components for new facility exhibitions. Developed history curriculum for all educational programs including school progra ms, public demonstrations, and human interpretation of archaeolo gical and historic sites. Led seven-day historic/ecological Everglades tours and ten-day historic/ecological Florida Keys tours for Smithsonian Field Series. 1976 to 1979 Museum of Science, Miami, Florida Director of Education Developed and directed science education programs including hiring and supervision of six fulltime and 47 part-time staff and instructors. Trained and supervised 100 plus volunteer docents. Was responsible for fiscal pl anning of budget and fund raising for program activities. Specia lized in Children’s Outdoor natural history activities.

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1974 to 1976 Graduate Student, Unive rsity of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida Instructor of laboratory classes, including lectures, demonstrations, tutoring, and testing in General Biology and Genetics. Research in aquatic ecology and small mammal population studies. Familiar with ecological methods, anatomy, and physiology. 1970 to 1974 United States Coast Guard Honors Florida Association of Museums Lifetime Achievement Award Innovator Award Hispanic Heritage – Amigo Award; friend of the Hispanic community Selected Presentations Annual presentations at ASTC, AAM, FAM and other regional and local venues on Leadership, Education, Science and Creativity. Private Consulting on Planning, Design and Group Dynamic Facilitation. Selected Publications Ostrenko, W. and F. Steier; Conversations as a Core Process; Creating a Culture of Di alogue in Juanita Brown and David Issac in The World Caf; Shaping our futures through conversatio ns that matter, Shaffer, Berrett; Kohler 2005 Steier, F. and Ostrenko, W. “Taking Cybernetics Seriously at a Science Center: Reflection-in-interaction and Second Order Organizational Learning. Cybernetics and Human Knowing, 2000, Vol. 7, 2-3, pp. 47-69. Ostrenko, W. and Atherholt, W. “e-Commerce in Science Museums,” published ASTC 2000 Ostrenko, W. and Zajonc, M. "Banya n Trees to Cultural Cornerstones," Southeastern Museum Conference Journal Published 1984 by Southeastern Museum Confer ence, Memphis, Tennessee. Ostrenko W., Rothstein, B. and Mazzotti, F.J. "Population Dy namics and Utilization of the Exo tic Melaleuca quinquenervia by T hree Sympatric Rodents. Abstract. Florida Academy of Science, 1979 Annual Meeting. Ostrenko, W. and Mazzotti, F.J. "The Role of Science Museum s in Environmental Education Bringing the Public and the Environment Together." Abstract. Florida Academy of Science, 1977 Annual Meeting. Synergistic Activities Smithsonian Associate Field Trip L eader – Everglades and Big Cypress Association of Science Technology Centers Conference – Problem Solving Techniques, 2001 Advisory Board, Cultural Institutions Management Program, 2001 to present Advisory Board, American Association of Museums, Museums & Community, 2000-2001 Association of Science Technology Centers Conference – Contemporary Exhibit Design, 2000 Collaborators and Other Affiliations Collaborators Dr. Fred Steier, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida Dr. Judith Lombana, Hillsborough County School System, Tampa, Florida Dr. Anita Goel, Nanobiosym, Boston, Mass. Dr. Frank Mazzotti, Urban Wildlife Specialist, Ft. Lauderdale. FL

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Museum Experts Team Member GLENN G. WILLUMSON 9821 SW 55th Road University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32608 School of Art and Art History 352-273-3072 P.O. Box 115801 gwillumson@arts.ufl.edu Gainesville, FL 32611-5801 352-392-0201, ext. 234 Employment Education Doctor of Philosophy in Art History, Univer sity of California, Santa Barbara. 1988. Master of Arts in Art History, Un iversity of California, Davis. 1984. Bachelor of Arts in English, cum laude St. Mary's College, Moraga, California. 1971. Selected Publications Iron Muse: Picturing the Transcontinental Railroad Berkeley: University of California Press. Accepted, publication 2013. “Grand Schemes and Big Things: E. B. Cr ocker and the Transc ontinental Railroad Legacy,” in The Crocker Art Museum Collection Unveiled ed. Scott Shields (Sacramento: Crocker Art Museum, 2010), 11-21. “’Photographing under Difficulties:’ Andrew J. Russell’s Photography for the King Survey,” in Framing the West (New Haven: Yale Univ ersity Press, 2010), 175-86. “The Emerging Role of the Educator in the Art Museum,” a chapter in From Periphery to Center: Art Museum Education in the 21st Century edited by Patricia Villeneuve. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association, 2007. “History Museums and Indicators to Assess th eir Impact on Quality of Life in their Communities,” an essay in Contribution of Historic Preservation to th e Quality of Life in Florida: Technical Report Tallahassee: Florida Department of Stat e, 2006, section V, unpaginated (32 pages). “Making Meaning: Photographic Materiality in the Library and the Art Museum,” a chapter in Photographs, Objects, Histories edited by Elizabeth Edwards. London: Routledge Press, 2004, pp. 62-80. 2001Professor of Art History and Di rector of Graduate Program in Museum Studies, University of Florida 1992-2001 Curator, Palmer Museum of Art, The Pennsylvania State University 1990 Visiting Professor, Department of Art History, University of California, Irvine 1988-1992 Curator for the History of Phot ography and American Art, J. Paul Getty Research Center 1987 National Writing Project Fellow 1971-1981 Teacher, California Secondary Schools Lifetime Teaching Creden tial, State of California (1976)

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W. Eugene Smith and the Photographic Essay NY: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Awarded a J. Paul Getty Publication Grant. "Alfred Hart: Photographer of th e Transcontinental Railroad." History of Photography XII/1 (January-March 1988), pp. 61-75. Selected Academic Awards and Honors Bill Lane Fellow, Stanford University, Fall 2008. Senior Research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum of American Art, 2007-2008. Beinecke Fellow, Yale University, 2007. Florida State Grant, Depart ment of State, 2005-06. Part of an intercollegiate team that included the Colleges of Law, Recreation and Tourism, Architecture and Historic Preservation. National Endowment for the Humaniti es Summer Institute Fellow, 2005. National Endowment for the Humanities, Fe llowships for University Teachers, 1998. Selected Lectures “Competition and Collaboration: Early Photography of the American West,” Smithsonian American Art Museum, April 9, 2010. “The Redemptive Space of the First Transc ontinental Railroad,” A nnual Conference of The Western History Asso ciation, October 9, 2009. “Soft Power: The Photographic Archive and the Central Pacific Railroad,” Business History Annual Conference, April 10-13, 2008. “Assessing Your Museum’s Impact on the Comm unity,” chaired session at the American Association of Museums Conference, May 13-17, 2007. Keynote address at “Gallery Praxis,” a coll aborative conference associated with the National Art Education Association and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, January 11-13, 2007. Selected Curatorial Projects Historic Moments in St. Augus tine’s History, Government Hous e, St. Augustine, Florida, 2009. (Co-curated with seminar students) Curator, History Past, History Present: Th e Daguerreotype Portrait in America January 2001. Palmer Museum of Art. Curator, “ The Crossing ”: A Video Installation by Bill Viola September 1999. Palmer Museum of Art. Co-Curator, Dismal Science: Photo-Wo rks by Allan Sekula, 1972-1996 January 1997. Palmer Museum of Art.

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Museum Experts Team Member SOPHIA KRZYS ACORD, PH.D. Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere University of Florida (UF) 200 Walker Hall P.O. Box 118030 Gainesville, FL 32611 USA skacord@ufl.edu FACULTY POSITION 2010Associate Director, Center for the Huma nities and the Public Sphere, UF present Program development and evaluation 2011Lecturer, Department of Sociol ogy and Criminology, & Law, UF present Instruction in: qualitative research met hods, technology studies, cultural sociology 2007Research Scientist, Center for Studies in High er Education, University of California, Berkeley 2010 Project Manager, the Future of Scholarly Communication and Meaning and Locus of Peer Review for Publication both funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation EDUCATION 2009 Ph.D., Sociology, University of Exeter, UK *Awarded an Honorable Mention by the 2010 ASA Dissertation Award committee. 2005 M.Res. (Masters of Research Methodology), Sociology, University of Exeter, UK Graduated summa cum laude 2003 B.A., Sociology & Anthropology (Minor, Interpretation Theory), Swarthmore College, PA Graduated with High Honors, Phi Beta Kappa OTHER RESEARCH AND EVALUATION EXPERIENCE 2003Research Associate Center for Mobile Communication Studies Rutgers University 2007 Designed, conducted, and published research on digital technologies and information-seeking. 2005 Research Assistant School of Education and Lifelong Learning University of Exeter Provided research support to Professor Gert Biesta on evidence-based practice in education. 2003Research Consultant and Evaluator Department of Drama University of Exeter 2004 Action research of On the Edge, an applied drama about first-episode psychosis. On the Edge won the UK Department of Health’s 2005 Health and Social Care Awards in the Southern region. 2000Intern La Dlgation aux Arts Plastiques Le Ministre de la Culture, Paris, France 2001 Created a national database of museum frequentation and education programs. 2001Assistant to Outreach Coordinator and Evaluator InterAct Theatre Company Philadelphia, PA 2002 Prepared, instructed, and evaluated NEA-funded theatrical residencies focusing on conflict resolution in juvenile detention centers. 2000 Ba rrymore Recipient for Best Education Department. 1992Archival Assistant Special Collections Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 1998 Assisted in processing book, manuscript, and photographic collections, cataloguing new books. SELECTED PEER-REVIEWED PU BLICATIONS AND WHITE PAPERS Acord, S.K. and Harley, D. (forthcoming) “Credit, tim e, and personality? Incorporating disciplinary needs and values into predictions about the future of scholarly communication.” New Media & Society.

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Acord, S.K. (conditionally accepted). Installing contempor ary art: Curatorial power an d agency in configuring museum publics. Cultural Sociology. Harley, D. and Acord, S.K. (2011, March). Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future. Berkeley, CA: Center for Studies in Higher Education. Harley, D. & Acord, S.K. (2010). Studying the impacts of embedded disciplinary cultures in a networked Academy White paper for the NSF, SBE 2020: Future Research in the Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences. Harley, D., Acord, S.K., Earl-Novell, S., Lawrence, S. & King, C.J. (2010) Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication Berkeley, CA: Center for Stud ies in Higher Education. Acord, S.K. & DeNora, T. (2008). Culture and the arts: From art worlds to arts-in-action. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 619(1), 223-237. Acord, S.K. (2006). Beyond the code: New aesthetic methodologies for the sociology of the arts. Sociologie de l’Art OPUS 9-10, 69-86. Acord, S.K. (2006). The museum as university: Looking out–looking in. Protocols: History and Theory 2. SELECTED INVITED PRESENTATIONS Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), 1-2 December 2011. “Isn’t that a Tool? Interpreting and Championing Digital Scholarly Communication in the Humanities” “Understanding Digital Natives” web seminar, 4 May 2010. Presented by the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) in collaboration with the Associ ation for American Univer sity Presses (AAUP). Evaluation Practices in Art Worlds, Social Science Research Center Berlin, 27-28 November 2009. A peer-reviewed workshop organized by the research unit on Cultural Sources of Newness: “Does ‘it work’? A microethnographic study of the installation of contemporary art.” American Sociological Association, NYC, 2007. Cultu re network roundtable pres entation: “Installing contemporary art: Configuring the next generation of museum visitors.” International Sociological Association World Congress, Durban, 2006. RC37 Sociology of the Arts: “The curator as sociologist: Bridging the gap between so ciology and the exhibition of contemporary art.” European Sociological Association, Toru 2005. Collective Memory: “Cultural strategies of classification: Artistic controversy and the public shaping of cultural heritage.” SELECTED SERVICE At UF: Creative Campus Committee, Committee for Ci vic Engagement, University Library Committee, Faculty Senate, Data Lifecycle Committee, Qualitative Research Board, Social Entrepreneurship Board Founding Editor: Music and Arts in Action (MAiA) Referee: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Museum Anthropology, Sociological Theory, Theory and Society

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Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Paul Andrew Ortiz Director Associate Professor Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Department of History 245 Pugh Hall 210 Keene-Flint Hall P.O. Box 115215 P.O. Box 117320 University of Florida University of Florida Gainesville, Florida, 32611 Gainesville, Florida, 32611 352-392-7168 (352) 392-6927 (Fax) http://www.history.ufl.edu/oral/ portiz@ufl.edu EDUCATION Ph.D., Department of Histor y, Duke University, May 2000. B.A., The Evergreen State College, 1990 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Director, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, University of Florida, 2008-Present. Associate Professor, Department of Hist ory, University of Florida, 2008-Present. Associate Professor, Department of Community St udies, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2005-2011. Assistant Professor, Department of Community Studies, UC-Santa Cruz, 2001-2005. Visiting Assistant Professor of History and Documentary Studies, Duke University, 2000-2001. PUBLICATIONS: BOOKS Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Bla ck Organizing and White Violen ce in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920 American Crossroads Series, George Gund Foundation imprint in African American Studies (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995) William Chafe, Raymond Gavins, Robert Ko rstad, and Paul Ortiz, et. al., (eds.) Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Talk About Life in the Segregated South (New York, The New Press, 2001; 2008). PUBLICATIONS: SELECTED ESSAYS Essay, “Black History’s Revolutionary Tradi tion, C.L.R. James’s Visionary Legacy,” Against the Current (January/February 2012) http://www.solidar ity-us.org/node/3494 Essay, “Stetson Kennedy and the Pursuit of Truth,” Facing South Blog, August 30, 2012. Republished in The Florida Historical Quarterly (Fall, 2011); The Oral History Review (Forthcoming), & Vital Speeches (forthcoming). http://www.southernstudies.org/2011/08/voices -stetson-kennedy-and-the-pursuit-of-truth.html Guest Editorial, “In Support of Our St udents, In Support of the DREAM Act,” Latino Studies (2010) 8, 438441. Chapter, “¡ Si, Se Puede Revisited: Latina/o Wor kers in the United States ,” in Social Work Practice with Latinos Eds., Richard Furman & Nalini Negi (Lyceum Books, 2010).

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Essay, “Arizona’s New Laws: An Attempt to Secure Cheap Labor?” Truthout June 2, 2010, http://archive.truthout.org/arizonasnew-laws-a-pathway-cheap-labor60041 Chapter, (Afterward), “Revising Florida, Revising Civil Ri ghts History,” in Old South, New South, or Down South? Florida and the Contemporary Civil Rights Movement Ed., Irvin D. S. Winsboro (West Virginia University Press, 2009). Chapter, “The New Battle for New Orleans,” in Hu rricane Katrina: Response and Responsibilities. 2nd edition. Edited by John Brown Childs (Berkele y: North Atlantic Books, 2008) Essay, “On the Shoulders of Giants: Senator Ob ama and the Future of American Politics,” Truthout November 25, 2008, http://archive.truthout.org/112508R Essay, “Remembering Racial Terror: The Behind the Veil Project, ” “ Radical History Review, vol. 97, Special Issue: Truth Commissions : State Terror, History, and Memory (Winter 2007) Chapter, “Farm Worker Organizing in America: From Slavery to Csar Chvez and Beyond,” in The Human Cost of Food: Farmworker Lives, Labor, and Advocacy edited by Charles D. Thompson and Melinda Wiggins (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002). BOOKS IN PROGRESS: Behind the Veil: African Americans in the Age of Se gregation, 1895-1965 with William H. Chafe, Thavolia Glymph, Raymond Gavins and Robert Korstad (Manuscript in Progress) Our Separate Struggles Are Really One: African American and Latina/o Hi stories (Boston: Beacon Press, manuscript under contract ) SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORS: Presented with The Key to the City of Ocoee, Florida by Mayor S. Scott Vandergrift, January 18, 2010. (For delivering MLK Keynote Address.) Harry T. and Harriett V. Moore Book Prize, 2006, Florida Historical Society and the Florida Institute of Technology for Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920 Lillian Smith Book Award, 2002, Southern Regional Council for Remembering Jim Crow : African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South (With William H. Chafe, et. al.) Carey McWilliams Book Award The MultiCultural Review (outstanding work related to the U.S. experience of cultural diversity) for Remembering Jim Crow (2002). Project Award for Outstanding Use of Oral History, 1996, Oral History Association, for “Behind the Veil” project. Key Libraries Staff

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Judith C. Russell Home: Office: 516 NE 4th Street P.O. Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32601 Gainesville FL 32611-7001 (202) 262-6501 (352) 273-2505 russell@erols.com jcrussell@ufl.edu Recent Experience: 2007 to Present University of Florida Dean of University Libraries • Leads the George A. Smathers Libraries, the larg est information resource system in the state of Florida, with a permanent staff of 225 and a budget of $27 million • Responsible for research services and scholar ly resources to support the diverse academic and research interests of the Un iversity’s students and faculty 2003 to 2007 U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) Superintendent of Documents (Managi ng Director, Information Dissemination) • Leads the agency in providing public access to information published by the U.S. government and establishing the policy guidance and strategy for its information dissemination programs with a combined staff of 220 and income of $70 million • Responsible for GPO’s Library Services and Content Management business unit that includes the Federal Depository Library Program, the Cataloging and Indexing Program, the International Exchange Service and GPO Access, the agency’s online public access databases • Responsible for GPO’s Publication and Info rmation Sales business unit that sells U.S. government publications and provides reimbursa ble distribution services to Federal agencies • Serves as the primary spokesperson and advocate for GPO’s information dissemination programs • Collaborates and negotiates with other Federa l agencies to ensure no-fee permanent public access to published Federal information thr ough GPO information dissemination programs • Consults with the professional and scholarly library and information science communities on the future roles of libraries, educational requirements for the next generation of information professionals and essential retraining for existing professionals 1998 to 2003 U.S. National Commission on Libraries & Information Science (NCLIS) Deputy Director • With Commissioners and Executive Director, responsible for development and implementation of NCLIS policy and communication of policy recommendations to the Administration, the Congress and other interested individuals and organizations • Responsible for NCLIS administration, in cluding financial management, appropriations, contracts and purchasing, personnel, publications management, and information technology • Organized hearings on Kids and the Internet, Library and Information Services for Individuals with Disabilities, School Librarians: Knowledge Navigators Through Troubled Times, and the proposed closing of the National Te chnical Information Service (NTIS) • Produced A Comprehensive Assessment of P ublic Information Dissemination ; Trust and Terror: New Demands for Crisis Information Dissemination and Management and Public Sector/Private Sector Interaction in Providing Information Services 1996 to 1998 IDD Enterprises, L.P.

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Director, Government Services Di vision, IDD-Digital Alliances • Responsible for introducing IDD products and services into the Federal, state and local government markets, including management of the sales and sales support staff • Responsible for IDD responses to Requests for Proposals (RFP) • Provided business analysis and specification of requirements (proposals) for IDD custom webs sites such as Smith Barney Access and Liberty Leaps 1991 to 1996 U.S. Government Printing Office Director, Office of Electronic Inform ation Dissemination Services (EIDS) • Responsible for GPO Access Online information services, including implementation of the Superintendent of Documents' World Wide Web site • Responsible for the design, marketing, docum entation, user support and training for all GPO electronic products • Managed the sale of electronic information, including over 75 CD-ROM titles and a wide variety of other Federal information in various formats Director, Library Programs Service • Responsible for the Federal Depository Librar y Program, the International Exchange Service, and the Cataloging and Indexing Program (Monthly Catalog of US Government Publications) • Performed as a dual assignment for 16 mont hs while also serving as Director, EIDS Director, Information Dissemination Policy • Responsible to the Public Printer for development and implementation of internal and external information policy objectives 1988 to 1991 Mead Data Central [Lexis-Nexis] Government Market Manager • Responsible for coordination of activities to advance the development of federal, state and local government markets for the LEXIS/NEXIS services, including coordination of sales and promotional activities, development of federal state-wide and group contracts, submission and negotiation of annual FEDLINK contract, and development of custom pricing proposals for other customer groups 1986 to 1988 & Russell Associates 1982 to 1983 Management Consultant • Provided strategic planning, acquisition/ competition analysis, product design and enhancement, and marketing services to info rmation companies, trade associations, government agencies and libraries Current Advisory and Editorial Boards: • Present-elect of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) • Association of Research Libr aries (ARL) Board of Directors • National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) Board of Direct ors, 2005-present, (2010-2011 President) [http://www.nfais.org] • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Information and Library Science Board of Visitors, 2006 [http://sils.unc.edu/] Special Awards: • Special Libraries Association’s Profes sional Award (2005) “For outstanding cont ributions to the global community of information professionals…” • Federal Computer Week's Federal 100: The Readers' Choi ce Awards (1993) "In recognition of those individuals who have made a difference over the past year in t he federal information technology community... Education: • Master of Science in Library Science, The Ca tholic University of America, Washington, DC • Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross, Washington, DC Key Libraries Staff

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Rachel A. Schipper, Ph.D., University Librarian University of Florida, Associate Dean/Technology & Support Services, University Libraries, 2009-Present Division of 110 staff and faculty within 7 units: acquisitions; cataloging and me tadata; interlibrary loan, electronic reserves, circulation policy and copyright services; digital services and shared co llections; information technology; and, facilities (12 buildings). Coordinates representation for th e Mellon-funded Open Library Environment (OLE) project. Board member of the Northeast Florida Library Information Network, the Panama Canal Museum, and member of the Panama Canal Society. Georgia College & State University, Dean, Libr ary & Instructional Technology Center, 2004-2009 Responsible for construction and renovat ion of the 150,000 square foot facili ty housing collections, instructional technology, and the museum. Prominent archival collections Flannery O’Connor manuscripts and the papers of Senator Paul Coverdell. Coordination includes BlackBoard/WebCT and online instruction, Media Production Resources (UTV and AV), the iPod Initiative, and the Instructional Technology Center (11 comput er labs). Chair, Conflict Re solution Committee, and served on the Chancellor’s Committee for Altern ative Dispute Resolution, Regents Acad emic Committee on Libraries (RACL), and Chair, e-collection development (RACL). Shepherd University, De an, Library and Information Sciences, 2000-2004 Oversight for construction and renovation of the 95,000 square foot facility housing the senatorial collection of Robert C. Byrd, the Scarborough Library, the galleries, and audio visu al services. Developed the Scarborough Society—the Friends of the Library--and chaired the Strategic Technology Pl anning Committee. Chair of the Institutional Management Committee, successfully submitti ng both a Title III Planning Grant and a Title III grant. Florida Institute of Techno logy, Assistant Director, Information Services, 1993-2000 Management of web enhancement, techno logy, fundraising, media and technical services, and facilities. Co-founder of the Friends of the Evans Library providing the funding to reno vate the public gallery spaces with design assistance from the National Gallery of Art. Co-founder of the Enhancin g Teaching Excellence Committee, served on the Center for Distance Learning Advisory Board, and the Central Florida Library Cooperative Board of Trustees. The University of Maryland, McKeldin Library, Catalog Librarian, 1991-1992 Johns Hopkins University, Eisenhower Library, Circulation/Reserves, 1990-1991 The Pennsylvania State Universi ty, Pattee Libraries, Hispanic Bibliographic Specialist, 1987-1990 Ed.S. and Ph.D. The Florida Instit ute of Technology, Computer Science M.L.S. The University of Maryland, Library Science B.S and M. Ed. The Pennsylvania State University, Art Education/Museum Studies Gallery Management: Kern Graduate Commons; Zoller Gallery; member Palmer Art Museum ; art certification K-12, Panama (Curundu Jr. High) Publications

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€ Schipper, R.A. (2011). Museum and library partnershi ps: the Panama Canal Museum Joins the Gator Nation, Florida Libraries, 54 (2), Fall 2011. € E. Deumens, L. N. F. Taylor, R. A. Schipper, C. Botero, R. Garcia-Milian, H. F. Norton, M. R. Tennant, S. K. Acord, C. P. Barnes (2011). Research Data Lifecycle Manageme nt: Tools and Guidelines, Research Computing Databases website: http://rcs.columbia.edu/rdlm New York: Columbia University Creative Commons. € Schipper, R.A. (2011). Discovering Panama. In Panama Canal Townsites. Seminole, Florida: Panama Canal Museum, p. 144. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). PCM/UF Partnership Progresse s. Panama Canal Museum Review, Fall/Winter 2010. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). PCM/UF and Library of Congress Plan 100th Anniversary Exhibit. Panama Canal Museum Review, Fall/Winter 2010. € Schipper, R.A. and Daley, M. ( 2010). Welcome to the University of Florida Libraries (video). http://www.youtube.com /watch?v=aZ7Z43qcsxg € Schipper, R.A. and Egolf, K. (2010). The Panama Cana l Museum joins the Gator Nation. Chapter One, Spring 2010. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). Renovations and OffSite Moves. Smathers Libraries web site. http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ pio/renovations.html € Schipper, R.A. (2008). From the Dean. Notes & Quotes: Th e Official Newsletter of the Georgia College & State University Library & Instructional Te chnology Center, no. 2, Fall 2008. € Schipper, R.A. (2007). Book Review: High er Education in the Internet Age. Ge orgia Library Quarterly, vol. 44, no. 3, Autumn 2007. € Schipper, R.A. (2007). From the Dean. Notes & Quotes: Th e Official Newsletter of the Georgia College & State University Library & Instructional Te chnology Center, no. 1, Spring 2007. € Schipper, R.A. (2006). From the ground up. Georgi a Library Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 1, Spring 2006. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). Scarborough Library rededication. The Newsletter of the Scarbo rough Society, vol. 1, no. 2, December 2004. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). Library news. The Newsletter of the Scarborough Society, vol. 1, no. 1, May 2003. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). From the ground up: Library construction. West Virginia Libraries, May 2003. € Schipper, R.A., (2003). Shepherd Colle ge Technology Oversigh t Committee Strategic Pl an. Shepherd College. € Schipper, R.A. and Krist, P.S. (2002). Consideration of learning style, fi eld orientation, format citizen status, and time in Internet instruction. The Journal of Computing in Small Colleges, 17(3), February 2002. € Schipper, R.A. (2000). Computer-assisted instruction, learning style, field orientation, time measurement, and citizen status: bibliographic instruction and college fres hmen. Dissertation: Florida Institute of Technology, Science Education/Computer Science. € Schipper, R.A. and Bonhomme, M. (2000). The Center fo r Distance Learning at Florida Tech Annual Report. Florida Institute of Technology. Key Libraries Staff

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Bess de Farber 2010 NW 36 Drive Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 273-2519, bdefarber@ufl.edu PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE University of Florida (UF) Libraries Grants Manager (October 2008 to present) Responsibilities include: all pre and post award activities relate d to grants projects for nine university libraries. Initiated grants management program for training and mentoring librarians and support staff in grant seeking, submission, and post award activit ies with emphasis on collaborative projects within UF and beyond. Manage all grant-related activities from idea-stage to project completion including developing budgets, project planning and st rategies, interfacing with fund ers, grant writing, and research ing funding opportunities. In fall 2009, established a student grants training program (820 students to date), for finding and prep aring fellowship applications, with Graduate Sc hool and NSF-funded Innovation through Integration and Institutionalization (I3) progr am. Consistently working with Division of Sponsored Research and Contracts & Grants personnel for pre and post award management to ensure compliance with university/sponsor s’ policies, setting up contracts and re vising award budgets/project plans. ASK Associates Principal (May 1995 to present) Responsibilities vary according to contract, including: writing and managing grants pr ograms, developing projects and collabora tions; facilitating planning retreats; creating feasibility studies for new programs; advising executives and board members on managem ent issues; networking with funders, troubleshooting within community to mend relationships, and training staff members to perform grants and other management functions. Client organizations have included: arts and culture, community development, healthcare, education, social service and philanthropic agencies. University of Arizona Libraries Grants & Revenue Manager (May 2005 to September 2008) Responsibilities included pre and post award grants management. Initiated grants seeking program for training and mentoring librarians and staff in grant seeking and post award activities w ith emphasis on collaborative projects. Managed all grant-rela ted activities including developing budgets, project planning and st rategies, interfacing with fund ers, writing, and researching. Consistently worked with Sponsored Projects Department, pre and post award, to ensure complian ce with university/funders polici es, setting up contracts and revising award budgets/project plans. Developed assessments and plans for revenue generating activitie s. All processes were carried out in a team-based organizational envi ronment. Constantly provided facilitation services for collaborat ive projects, meetings and planning retreats. Served as adjunct in structor for the School of Information & Library Services for a graduate course in grantsmanship. Nonprofit Resource Institute (NRI) Co-Founder, Interim Executive Director, Consu ltant (May 1998 through February 2001) Provided comprehensive resources for improving the management and governance of no nprofit organizations in Palm Beach and Martin Counties. Co-founded NRI utilizing an asset-based approach for providing technical assistance and training. Presented t hree workshop series serving over 400 participan ts in these categories: governance/ oper ations; funding; programs/evaluation; and, marketing/communications. Provided one-on-one technical assistance and board training to more than 350 organizations/government entities. Collaborated to strengthen nonprofit grantee complian ce for the Quantum Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Community Foundation, Lost Tree Foundation, United Way, Palm Healthcare Foundation, and Children’s Services Council. Community Foundation for Palm Beach & Martin Counties Program Officer (October 1994 – May 1995) Managed grant review and funding allocations for Social Service, Human and Race Relations, and Arts and Cultural programs in Pa lm Beach and Martin Counties; staffed Human and Race Relati ons planning committee with board/community leaders. Palm Beach County Cultural Council Director of Grants & Organization Services (September 1989 – October 1994) Provided grants management of $2 million in public tourism tax funds annually to 45 Palm Beach County cultural organizations; developed/managed all government and foundation grant appli cations/awards for Cultural Council programs; trained cultural organizations/artists to prepare government, foundation, and corporate grant applications; provided management technical assis tance to cultural organization staff/board members; presented monthl y Cultural Executives Committee events; and provided consulting services for planning and arts-in-education projects statewide.

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Pinellas County Arts Council Financial Manager (May 1985 – September 1989) Managed all financial activity ($400,000 annual budget) of public/private local arts agency, implementing fund accounting. Man aged all grant programs including local, state and re-granting programs, and coordinated local and state government audits. Arts in Education Programs Manager (1987 – 89) Negotiated artist contracts; communicated with professional artists for Arts-in-Education program; scheduled programs; designed curriculum and survey materials for school system distribution; implemented new programs; provided consulting to community artists/arts organizations ; guest speaker for community functions; provided staff training/development for educational organizations; and staffed fund-raising/education committees. EDUCATION/CERTIFICATIONS 2003 Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL: Master of Nonprofit Management 1978 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA: Bachelor of Music in Clarinet Performance 1976 Rollins College, Winter Park, FL: Music and Environmental Studies 2009/2003 International Association of Fac ilitators: Certified Professional Facilitator 2002 AchieveGlobal: Certified Trainer: Frontlin e Leadership and Leadership for Results Modules 2002 Raising More Money Model Training Certification for Board Members 2000 Drucker Foundation: Board Self-Assessment Process 2000 National Center for Nonprofit Boards: Critical Components of Effective Governance RECENT INSTRUCTOR/WORKS HOP PRESENTER/FEATURED SPEAKER/FACILITATOR 2011 University of Florida, Land Grant Agricultural Knowledge Discovery System Virtual Conference 2011 University of Florida, Intro to Grants Seeki ng and International Funds for College of Education 2011 University of Florida, Intro to Grants Seeking for McNair Scholars Program 2010 University of Florida, Strategic Planning Retreat for Department of Biology 2010 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for Honors Freshman Students in the Sciences 2010 University of Florida, Grants Seeking for Museums (Part 1 and 2) 2010 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for Women in Science and Engineering 2010 Florida State University, CoLAB Planning Series for statewide Scholarly Communications Workshop 2010/2011 University of Florida, Grant Seeking Basics for International Students 2010/2011 University of Florida, Collaboration Basics for Grant Seekers, Grant Wr iting Course, PhD candidates 2009/2010 University of Florida, How to Apply for NSF Do ctoral Dissertation Improvemen t Grants (Biology/Various) 2009/2010 University of Florida, How to Apply for Na tional Science Foundation Gra duate Assistant Fellowships 2009 Florida Atlantic University, Into to Grant Se eking, Grant Writing Course, Nonprofit Management 2009 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for College of Fine Arts Fall Faculty Meeting ASK ASSOCIATES, Inc. CLIENTS and CONTRACT SERVICES (Examples) MANAGEMENT SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS • Nonprofit Reso urce Institute (Palm Beach County): Program Devel opment Services for creation of organization from inception; Board Development; Grants Prepara tion and Reporting; Workshop Series development and implementation for two series; facilitation/technical assistance to over 400 organizations. Organizational development for new initiative: Interfaith Health & Wellness Association; Training Services to nonprofit boards; CoLAB Planning Series for 100 organization representatives • Nonprofit Resource Center (Broward): Various Training Services • Volunteer Broward: Board Planning Retreat • Junior League of Boca Raton: CoLAB Planning Series FUNDERS • Community Foundation for Broward: CoLAB Planning Workshops • Children’s Services Council: Planning Services for Fami ly Resource Centers, AchieveGlobal Frontline Leadership • Community Foundation for Palm Beach & Martin Counties: Grantee Organiza tion and Program Consulting Services; • Quantum Foundation: Organizational Development Services for Grantee Organization • Palm Beach County Cultural Council: Training Services fo r new grants administrator • Pew Public Education Fund /Education Foundation: Facilitation of Palm Beach County’s Arts Education Plan • United Way/CSC: CoLAB Planning Series for HIV Prev ention for Teens resulting in collaborative grant proposals • United Way of Martin County: Training for grantees; CoLAB Planning Series for Martin County Literacy • United Way of Palm Beach County: Collaboration Planni ng & Grant Writing Services • Education Foundation of Palm Beach County : Introduction to Grant Writing for Teachers Key Libraries Staff

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Chelsea Dinsmore International and Stat e Documents Librarian Assistant University Librarian Education: University of Texas, Austin, Library and Information Science, MLIS, 1997 University of Florida, History, MA, 1994 New College, Sarasota, FL, History, B.A., 1991 Work Experience: University of Florida Libraries, PO Box 110711, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7011 From: July 2004 To: Present Title: International and State Documents Librarian Rank: Assistant Univer sity Librarian Scope of Duties: The International and State Documents Librarian deve lops, evaluates and provides access and reference service for the collections of international and state documents housed in the George A. Smathers Libraries. Duties include oversigh t of and reference service for the Eu ropean Union Depository and Florida Depository Library Program collection, monitoring standing orders for the publications of international organizations, and developing and maintaining contac t with appropriate faculty and research centers on campus to determine program needs. Also supervis es the activities of the international and state document processing unit and maintains and u pdates the International Documents page of the departmental website, provides ge neral reference at the Documents Department desk, and occasional assistance on the Marston Science reference desk. Special Assignments: American and British History selector with collection management and bibliographic instruction duties. (Aug 2008Aug 2012) Interim Head of Inter Library Loan (May-Aug 2005) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Cent er, University of Texas, Austin, TX From: March 1998 To: October 2003 Title: Professional Librarian Scope of Duties: Created the Patron And Research Information System (PARIS), a cross-departmental database which tracks Ransom Center patrons and their duplication an d use permission requests. This system replaced an amalgam of several department specific Filemaker files, with a centrally managed Access/Coldfusion relational database structure, usab le by everyone. Last project work ed on involved the development and integration of an information system to track the cr eation and storage of digi tized items to accommodate several upcoming digitization initiatives. Publications: Books, contributed: Dinsmore, C., Pilot Grants for Outreach, in Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook 2123. American Library Association, Americ an Library Association. Chicago: 2010. Dinsmore, C., Taking Advantage of Small Grants for Outreach, in Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook 21-23. American Library Association, Am erican Library Association. Chicago: 2010. Russell Gonzalez, S., V. Davis, C. Dinsmore, C. Frey C. Newsom, and L. Taylor, Bioactive: A Game for Library Instruction in Gaming in Academic Libraries: Collections, Marketing, and Information Literacy Association of College and Resear ch Libraries. Chicago: IL, 2008. Arlen, S., C. Dinsmore, M. Davidson, An Introduc tion to Instructional Services in Libraries, Introducing Primary Documents to Undergraduates Haworth Press, New York, 119-134, 2008.

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Articles, refereed: Davis, V., Dinsmore, C., Serving a diverse and ever -changing agricultural sci ences department: Family, Youth & Community in perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Food Information 10 (1). (2009) Dinsmore, C., J. Russell and J. Swan beck, Electronic Transition at the University of Florida, Three Perspectives, Documents to the People Vol. 36, #1, Spring 2009. Grants: External: Principle Investigator, “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” a traveling exhibition and tour are funded by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to the National Constitution Center. Applied for with Colleen Seale and Shelley Arlen. Principle Investigator, Social Entrepreneurs Film Program, PBS/Frontline World grant, $500 (direct), [Sep 15-Nov 17, 2008], a grant program to support screenings and discussions on social entrepreneurs. Principle Investigator, Let’s Talk About It: Jewish Identity and Imagination: o Demons, Golems, and Dybbuks: Monsters of the Jewish Imagination and Modern Marvels: Jewish Adventure in the Graphi c Novel, American Library A ssociation and Nextbook Grant $5000 (direct). [Jan 2008-April 2009]. o Fathers and Daughters in a Changing World, American Library Association and Nextbook Grant, $1500 (direct), [Dec 2005-Dec 2006]. Co-Principle Investigator, Digitizing Hansard’s Br itish Parliamentary Databases, 2nd Series. Library Mini-grant program. $758.37 awarded to fund a p ilot project for digitizing a sample of the Parliamentary Debates. Membership and Service in the Profession: American Library Association (ALA), member, 2004-present ALA Membership Committee, 2005-06 Government Documents Round Tabl e (GODORT), member, 2004-present Membership Committee, committee a ppointment, Chair (05-06), 2004-07 Steering Committee, 2005-06 Publications Committee, co mmittee appointment, 2007-09 Cataloging Committee, ID TF Liaison, committee appointment, 2009-2010 International Documents Task Force, GODORT, ALA, member, 2004-present Chair 2011-2012 Committee Liaison, GODORT Ca taloging Committee, 2009-2012 Agency Liaison for Council of Euro pe, task appointment, 2005-present Florida Library Association, 2007-2009 European Information Association, 2006-2008 Key Libraries Staff

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John Freund University of Florida 20567 NW 257th Ter George A. Smathers Libraries High Springs, Florida 32643 Preservation Department 352-316-1259 Gainesville, Florida 32611 352-273-2835 johfreu@ufl.edu Education B.A., Journalism, 1974, University of Minnesota Certificate in Book and Paper Conservati on, 1980, San Francisco State University. Internship, 1980-81, Sutro Libr ary, San Francisco, California. Internship, 1980-81, San Anselmo Theologi cal Seminary, San Anselmo, California. Professional Experience San Francisco State University. Inst ructor, Bookbinding and Repair, 1981-1983. Taught beginning classes in bookbinding thro ugh the School of De sign And Engineering. Stanford University, Jonnson Library of Government Documents, Manager, Stacks and Circulation, 19811988. Supervised circulation, stack maintenance and also st affed the reference desk. S upervised move of entire collection in and out of the lib rary during renovations of 1985-86. University of Florida, Smathers Library, 1988 to present. Head, Conservation and Book Repair Unit of the Smat hers Libraries Preservation Department. Supervises and trains staff and volunteers performing repair and maintenance of the circ ulating collections, performs complex treatments of restoration and maintena nce of the Special Collections includi ng leather restoration, flat paper and manuscript treatments such as deac idification and encapsulation, provi des grant and project support, environmental monitoring and specialized reference and information on preservation to staff and general public. Research Interests Designer bindings and non traditional book binding. Photographs, especially non paper photography (Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes.) Flat paper restoration.

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Key Libraries Staff Samuel T. Huang University of Florida Libraries P.O. Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 Title: Associate Dean for Development & A dvancement, University Librarian Employment: Associate Dean for Development & Advancement, University Librarian, February 20, 2008University of Florida Associate Dean for External Relations, February, 2006 – February, 2008 University of Arizona Libraries Assistant Dean for External Relations, May 2000 – February 2006 University of Arizona Libraries, Tucson, AZ ( Full Librarian) University Libraries Development Director, 1994 April 2000 Curator, Rare Books & Special Collections, September 1991-April 2000. (Rank: Professor) Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Senior Research Librarian, October 1987 Se ptember 1989. (Rank: Associate Professor). Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Coordinator of Computer Reference Services, July 1985 October 1987. (Rank: Associate Professor) Northern Illinois Univ ersity, DeKalb, IL Coordinator of Library Services for the Physica lly Impaired, Coordinator of Career Collection and References, May 1980 June 1985 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Assistant Director, Undergraduate Librar y, 1978 1980 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Head, Interlibrary Loan Department and Re ference Librarian, 1973 1978 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Head, Interlibrary Loan, Reference and Rare B ooks Librarian, 1966 1973 (Rank: Instructor). Education: M.S. Degree in Education, No rthern Illinois University M.A. Degree in Library & Information St udies, Northern Illinois University B.A. Degree in English Language & Literatu re, Tamkang Universit y, Taipei, Taiwan. Membership and Service to the Profession: Chair of the Friends of Library Committee 2009 Association of Library Trus tees, Advocates, Friends and Foundation Board member, 2008 Board director of Friends of Library, USA (F LOUSA 2003-2008) ALA LLAMA RFDS Committee 2005-2010, Re-ele cted for the second term, 2010-2012 Academic Library Advancement and Developm ent Network (one of eight founders), 1998 Braddom Scholarship Committee, Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA) 20032005. Board Member (Member-at-Larg e), Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA), 2003 Leader, Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Li brary Development Discussion Group, 2000 2002.

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Horatio Alger Society Board Director, 2000 2003. Academic Library Advancement and Developm ent Network (ALADN) Conference Committee, 1999. American Library Association member 1975 – Association of Fundraising Professionals member, 2004 – Association of College Research Libraries (ACRL) Member 1975 ACRL RBMS Rare Books and Manuscripts, 1975 ACRL ULS University Libraries Member 1975 Horatio Alger Society Member 1999 – Library Administration and Management Association (LAMA) Member 2000 LAMA PRMS Publication Relati ons and Marketing Section 2000 LAMA FRFDS Fundraising and Financial Development 2000Selected Scholarly Presentations: (Invitations) 06/23/2010 "Things you wish to know about fundraising in Libraries but do not know where to begin: Roadmaps to fundraising success." ALA Annual Conference, Wash ington, D.C. (Invited by FOLUSA) 06/16/2010 "Development Officers as Managers." 2010 DOR AL Annual Meeting, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. 03/22/2010 "Collaborative Fundraising in Achieving the Univ ersity's Mission: It is not all about the libraries," ALADN Annual Conference (Invited by ALADN Program Committee) Santa Monica, CA 03/21/2010 "Library Development 101: Nuts & Bolts." (ALADN Pre-Conferen ce Program). Santa Monica, CA (Invited by AL ADN Program Committee). 11/19/2009 "The Art of Fundraising" Presenter at th e Art of Fundraising and Grant Writing Online Conference,( Invited by Alliance Li brary System, Learning Teams, LLC.) 1000 Attendees registered 07/13.2009 "Fundraising Basics for College and Universi ty Libraries," 2009 AL A Annual Conference (Invited by ALA LLAMA FRFDS Committee) 07/11/2009 "Nuts & Bolts for Academic Library Frie nds", 2009 ALA Annual Conference (Invited by Friends of Library U.S. A.) Selected Publications: Modern Library Technology and Reference Services. New York, Haworth Press, Inc., 1993 (Editor) Co-authored with Veer Steeg, Je nnie. “Reviewing the Literature” in Introduction to Research in Education. 6th edition, by Ary,D. & Jacobs, L. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth P ublishing, Summer 2001 “Communications and Speech” and “Disabilities” in M agazines for Libraries 8th edition, ed. By Bill Katz, N.J, Bowker, 1992, pp. 292-296; 344-353 “Literary Resources on the Employmen t of People with Disabilities” in Library Services for Career Planning, Job Searching, and Employment Opportunities. Ed. By Byron Anderson. New York, the Haworth Press, Inc., August 1992 Author. “Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way: Fundrai sing for the Academic Libraries.” The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2006. Pp. 146-151 All publications include 10 Book Chap ters and 27 Journal Articles.

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Key Libraries Staff Paul S. Losch Associate University Librarian Latin American Collection, University of Florida PO Box 117009 Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 273-2745 plosch@uflib.ufl.edu Library Work Experience June 2002-Present Operations Librarian, Latin American Collection, Smat hers Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. April 2000-June 2002 Senior Library Technical Assistant, Latin American Collection, Smathers Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Education M.S. in Library and Information Studies, School of In formation Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 2003. M.A. in Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Ga inesville, FL, 2002. Master's thesis entitled "Effect of School-based Management on Academic Achievement in Brazil." Postbaccalaureate Teacher Certification Program, Framingham State College, Framingham, MA, 1994. Certificates for Spanish (Grades 5-12) and Social St udies (Grades 9-12), with endorsement for Bilingual Education. B.A. magna cum laude in Spanish and Political Science, Clark Universi ty, Worcester, MA, 1993. Teaching Experience August 2000-Present (various semesters) Portuguese Instructor, Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Florida. August 1995-June 1997 Teacher of English as a Second Language, Pan American School of Bahia, Brazil. August 1994-June 1995 Spanish Teacher, Lancaster (MA) Middle School. Professional Organizations LASA (Latin American Studies Association). Member since 2000. Attended 2000, 2001, 2003 Conferences.

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SALALM (Seminar on Acquisition of Latin American Libr ary Materials). Member since 2002. Executive Board Member (2010-2013). Selected Publications and Exhibits “Dr. Henry W. Furniss, Cnsul Afro-N orte-Americano na Bahia, 1898-1905,” Revista Afro-sia (Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil), Vol. 40 (2009), pp.223-258. “The 1939 Visit of Gabriela Mistral” El Escribano: the St. Augustine Journal of History Vol. 45 (2008), pp. 124-143. “Then & Now: Celebr ating 75 Years of Latin American Studies.” CLASNotes [Publication of the UF College of Libe ral Arts and Sciences]. February 2006, pp.4-5. Valk, Barbara G., Hispanic American Periodicals Index 2003 UCLA Latin American Center, 2004 [Con tributing Indexer]. Brazil’s Popular Groups 1966-1986 Supplement 12. 2002. Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress Preservation Microfilming Program : Available from Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 2004. [Principal Indexer] Co-curator of various exhibits at the University of Florida, including those in Special and Area Studies Collections and in university art galleries, including “Padre Ccero: A View from the Ralph della Cava Gift” (2007), “Visions of Bahia, Brazil, from the Frances F. Switt Collection” (2008) and “Cuba: Past, Present and Future” (2009). Languages and Travel Fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Reading knowledge of French. Extensive Travel in Spain and Latin America

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Key Libraries Staff Randall David Renner renner@ufl.edu Education 1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photography. 1987 1990 Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida. Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude Employment 2002-Present University of Florida Libraries, Digital Library Center. Operations Manager, Library Associate 3. Supervision of daily operations of the Digital Libra ry Center including Bibliographic Control, Imaging, Quality Control, Optical Character Recognition, and Archiving. 8/2001-10/2002 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Photography Department. Photographer Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the campus wide photographic service bureau; including equipment specification, integration, production, and quality control. Responsibilities also included photographing museum and library collect ions in a studio environment and on location. Other duties included traditional black and white photographic printing and processing, E-6 processing and maintenance, and other technical photographic processes. 1/2001–8/2001 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Center for Instructional Technology and Training. Training Specialist Responsible for conducting training seminars of software programs to faculty and staff. This included development of graphic software training programs, and development of the Instructional Computing Activities Training Program. Various seminar content included: Digital Media, Web Site Development, Photoshop, Web Graphics, Digital Video, Acrobat, and The Effective Use of Laptops. 1999 – 2000 University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History. Adjunct Assistant Professor Responsible for curriculum development, instruction, and evaluation, and of the undergraduate digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage. 1998 – 2000 University of Florida Brain Institute Teaching Lab Resources. Audio Visual Specialist Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute, including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and Surgical Research and Training Lab. Scheduling, setup, and maintenance of all multimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Performed preventive and corrective maintenance, and instruction of multimedia resources to faculty and staff.

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1994 – 1997 University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics Departments. Photographer Responsibilities included the design and creation of photographic and graphic media including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally generated formats for teaching, research, publication and display. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Department of Art Gainesville, Florida. Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor Responsible for curriculum development, instruction, and evaluation of undergraduate photography courses in the Fine Arts department. Courses taught included Black and White Photography, Figure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea. 1991 1993 U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi-Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan. Program Coordinator / Instructor Developed specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in business, classroom, and individualized settings. 1988 1991 Florida State University, Department of Art Tallahassee, Florida. Color Darkroom Manager Designed, supervised and maintained the art department’s color darkroom facility consisting of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP-50 processor.

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Key Libraries Staff Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler l.s.wheeler@ufl.edu • (352) 273 – 2564 E D U C A T I O N M aster of A r ts in M useology 2009 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL B achelor of F ine A r ts in C r eative Photography, M inor in A r t H istor y 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL P R O F E SSI O N A L E X P E R I E N C E E xhibits C oor dinator 2012 p r esent George A. Smathers Libraries, Univer sity of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Provide technical and design support for e xhibits in library departments/branches € Coordinate incoming and outgoing loans € Coordinate scheduling and hosting of traveling exhibits € Design physical and online exhibits, collateral materials and multimedia companion content € Collect and analyze data for assessing th e effectiveness of the exhibition program T echnical T r aine r T r anslator and D esigne r 2006 p r esent Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) € Train local and international partner institutions in the digitization process, including adherence to copyright, metadata creation, specific equipment us e, current digitization standards and image manipulation € Contribute and translated content for the multilingual technical manual, website, promotional materials and software € Design promotional materials including pos ters, bookmarks and multimedia presentations € Transfer image-only designs into HTML and CSS for web display and online exhibit functionality M useum & Special P roj ects C oor dinator 2009 2011 Digital Library Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Served as the primary lia ison with museum partners € Developed online exhibits € Created supporting print mate rials and multimedia presentatio ns for the Digital Collections € Designed UF Digital Collections elements including page banners/headers and buttons € Assisted patrons and faculty in locating originals featured in th e Digital Collections as well as utilizing the digital objects in their resear ch, publications, presenta tions and/or teaching € Researched copyright of items to be included in the Digital Co llections and/or digital exhibits D igital P roduction Supe r visor 2005 2009 Digital Library Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Oversaw the primary digitization produc tion queue, which included books, documents, photographs, and other archival materials € Supervised imaging staff, includi ng 1 full-time and 15 part-time employees

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Prepared archival and library materials for digital imaging, including assessing need for preservation and equipment suitability € Monitored imaging quality for adherence to digitization standards and best practices S E L E C T E D E X H I B I T I O NS A R T B O U N D 2011 T he 2nd A nnual Student A rtists' Book Competition 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/exhibits/artbound2011 € Designed and created online exhibit to complement temporary physical exhibit A C elebration of Jewish L ife and C ulture A round the World 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ex hibits/jewishculture € Curated online exhibit with the Head and Senior Library Technical Assistan t of the Price Library € Designed all exhibit elements 30 Years of the Price L ibrary: T reasures from the Isser and Rae Price L ibrary of Judaica 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/exhibits/30years € Curated online exhibit with the Head and Senior Library Technical Assistan t of the Price Library € Designed all exhibit elements C arteles: C uban and M exican F ilm Posters from the E fran B arradas Collection 2010 http://www.dloc.com/exhibits/carteles € Curated, designed and wrote corr esponding texts for online exhibit F rom C anals to Conservation : A n E xhibit of the H istorical E verglades 2009 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/swamp/exhibitover € Curated and designed online exhibit Photographic F ormalities: from A nsel Adams to Weegee 2007 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL € Assisted museum Registrar and Curator of Phot ography in exhibit prep aration, including object packing, handling and transport from donor’s house to the museum € Researched artworks/artists and wrote corresponding exhibit labels P U B L I C A T I O NS Nemmers, Laura and Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler, "Advancing Digitization: Art and Technology," in Samuel P. H arn Museum of Art at Twenty Years: The Collection C atalogue, ed. Jason Steuber, Laura K. Nemmers, and Tracy E. Pfaff (Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010), 227231. S E L E C T E D P R E S E N T A T I O NS Society of F lor ida A r chivists A nnual M eeting 2009 "The Basics of Digitizing Coll ections" (with Laurie N. Taylor) F lor ida A ssociation of M useums A nnual C onfe r ence 2008 "Developing Collaborative Opportuniti es to Increase Accessibility to Exhibitions and Collections Online" (with Dwight Bailey and Susan Cooksey)

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Key Libraries Staff Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig ________________ Education: University of Michigan, Department of History, PhDABD University of Pennsylvania Department of Biology, Master of Arts. 1986-1991 Brown University A.B. in Biology, magna cum laude. 1979-1984 Courtesy Faculty Appointments, University of Florida Department of History, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for African Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for the Arts in Healthcare Resear ch and Education, College of Fine Arts Employment: 2001-present University of Florida, J. H. Miller Health Science Center Librar ies, Office of Senior Vice President, Health Affairs, and College of Medicine, Archi vist and Ed. Coor. Create archives,and history program; Director of Medical Humanities, Narr. Medicine & Medical Humanities programs, run Medical Student Reading Room activities. Washington State University 1997-2000 Faculty member, Department of English, Assistant Director Writing Lab & Coordinator, English 102; Tier I and Tier II Reader, P lacement Exams and University Writing Portfolio ; Instructor, English composition ; Adjunct Professor, Department of History. 1996 Writing Tutor, English 102. University of Idaho 1995 Assistant, Herbarium. 1994-1995 Laboratory Assistant, Department of Biology. 1992-1993 Adjunct Professor, Department of History. Teaching Experience: University of Florida 2011 (Fall) Undergraduate: (Un)Common Read course on H.G. Wells’, The Island of Dr. Moreau. (Spring) Undergraduate: (Un)Common Read course with focus on Barbar a Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. 2008present (Spring) Undergraduate courses: Medical Humanities and Clinical Practice, Junior Honors Seminar. Medical Student courses: Health and the Environment 4th year elective; Lecturer, Biomedical Ethics course. 2007-present (Fall and Spring) Medical Student courses: Small group leader, Essentials of Patient Care 1 & 2 2007, 2008 and 2010, 2011 (Spring) Undergraduate courses : Culture Health and the Arts in Sub-Saha ran Africa and the US, team taught with Jill Sonke-Henderson, CAHRE, and James Oliverio of the Digital Worlds Institute 2006-present Director of Medical Humanities Program with associated educational programs for medical students; (Fall and Spring) Medical Student Courses: Interdisciplinary Family Health 2004-2006 (Spring) Undergraduate courses: Junior Honors, medical humanities seminar. 2004present (Spring) Medical Student courses: HEART, AMSA 2002present Medical Student courses: various teaching commitments including: (Fall, Spring and Summer) Narrative Medicine and Medical Humanities elective; (Fall) Biomedical Ethics small group leader 2000-2003 Department of History: Intro. to Am. His. to 1877; His. Am. Med.; Honors His. Med Washington State University 1997-2000 Instructor, and Faculty, Department of En glish, Intro. to Writing; Hist. of Western Med.; Am. Slavery; Western Expl; Urban His tory. Poster@, Professional Discussions+, Conference Presentations#, and Invited Talks* +2011 July University of Florida, BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research. May 1. Led discussion on the movie I Am at the Hippodrome Theater, Gainesville 2. UF Talk on Body Snatching and medical dissection, to accompany traveling exhibition on Frankenstein. *March UF Talk History of African Americans in the medical profession, for SNMA meeting, University of Florida. *2010 November 13, UF, Talk: Medical Tourism, for international health seminar. #October 7-9 Arnold p. Gold Foundation, Gold Foundation Biennial Conf., pres. on Humanism Chapter projects. *August, UF, Talk: HOM Lect. Series, Balancing the humors and easing the arteries: bleeding in western medicine. UF Med. Ed. Journal Club : Medical Tourism and its implications for medical education. +July, UF: Arts in Medicine Summer Intens ive, Member of Discussion Panel on arts-in-medicine programs. #May, CIRN, Narrative Matters Conference, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, Panel presentation on collaborative project on narrative with Department of English *March, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Talk: Media representations and pharmaceutical advertising. *February, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Talk: Medical Tourism and Medical Ethics. *2009 November, UF, Talk: History of Medicine Lecture Series: Dr. Cade, Gatorade and the Promotion of Innovation. *July, UF, Talks: 1. History of science class: Eugenics and the Black Stork. 2. University of Florida, BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research. +June, UF: Reflective Writing Session for Arts in Medicine Summer Intensive February, Talks: 1. Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, History of Medicine lecture series: *“Building Toward Perfec tion”: George Harrell's Medical School Dreams and Realities *2. University of Florida History of Science Symposium: Eugenics Reflected: Ideas on Eugenics, Politi cs, and Heredity in Literature and Poetry. *2008 November, UF, Invited talk : History of Medicine lecture series Practice and Change in Native Amer ican Healing, Gainesville, FL #Hippodrome Theater Led discussion on movie Gainesville, FL Invited talk SNMA Conference History of African Americans in the Healing Professions, Jacksonville, FL *October, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Invited talk : Mendel’s Theater: Popularizing Eugenics in America. Gainesville, FL #Hippodrome Theater Led discussion on movie Elsa y Fred, Gainesville, FL #September: Invited attendance at Arnold P. Gold Foundation Biennial Meeting *June, UF, Invited talk: BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research *May, UF, Talk: History of Medicine Lecture Series. Mendel’s Theater: Popularizing Eugenics in America.

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*Invited talk : Creating a Culture of Humanism, COM, FSU *April, Invited talk: Creating a Medical Humanities Program, COM, FSU +March, Hippodrome Theater, Led discussion of movie The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Gainesville, FL *2007 November, UF Med. Ed. Journal ClubEmpathy and medical education *Generalists in Medical Education Conf.: talk “Using theater for public health interventions in medica l education” and roundtable “Teaching Medical Students to ‘See’” #September, Invited attendance at Arnold P. Gold Foundation conference *August, UF, CPET, Talk History of medicine lecture. *UF, The Black Stork and Eugenics in America. Invited lecture, History of Science course. #April AAMC SGSA meeting Poster presentations and roundtable discussion. *March, UF: Med. Ed. Journal Club : Art and observation in medical education *February, UF, HOS Society: Publicizing Eugenics. *2006 December, UF, Talk: The Black Stork: The Histor y of Eugenics in America HOM Series, COM. *October, UF, Talk: The History of the College of Medicine’s Early Faculty. 50th anniversary celebration, COM *UF, Talk: History of Women in Medicine, HOMLecture Series *September, UF, Talk: History of Women in the Health Science Center, Changing the Face of Medicine special events +April Conducted writing workshop for HEART elective, Ben Lomond, CA *February, SAHMS, Conference talk: Building Utopia in North Florida. *2005 December, UF, Talk: The Human Drama: Siting and Pkanning a Health Center, HOM Lecture Series, COM.. *March, UF, Invited Talk: The Extent of Eugenics Programs in the United States. HOS Society *February, SAHMS Conference Talk: From Social Stigma to Phil the sore: Antibiotics and syphilis. *2004November, UF, Invited Talk: Infectious disease and history HOM Lecture Series, COM *September, Conference talk, presentation on innovative programs to eliminate racially-based health disparities *May, UF, Talk: Infectious disease and history. HOM Lecture Series, COM *March, UF, Invited Talk: Women in Medicine at the University of Florida, talk for AMWA, COM *Febuary, Conference talk, N. Stoyan-Rosenzweig M. Hudson, and E. Dunbar. Symposium: Eugen., her. & the body pol: pop. and ind understandings. SAHMS. #February UF Psychoanalysis and Narrative Medicine Conference : Paper presented and workshopped at roundtable. *2003 March, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Invited Talk: Impact of disease on history. *2002 November UF, Talk: Eugenics and ideas about the nature of heredityHOM Lecture Series, COM *October UF, Talk: Eugenics of H.G. WellsHOM Lecture Series, COM *February UF, Talk: World medicine traditions and the idea of balancing the humorsHOM Lecture Series, COM #2001 November, GEMCS Conference, Philadelphia, PA, Talk : Expanding the Domestic Sphere: Farm as Utopia. *September, UF, Invited talk: Popularizing eugenicsHistory of Medicine Lecture Series,COM #2000 M. Farrington, C. Nelson, B. Pickford, and N. Stoyan-Rosenzweig 2000 Research Network Forum; CCCC Annual Convention. Minneapolis, MN *Condon, W., L. Johnson-Shull, D. Kelly-Riley, S. McLeod, N. Stoyan Rosenzweig and Victor Villanueva. 2000 When WPA Becomes WPAs: Issues on a Multiple WPA Campus. CCCC Annual Convention. Minneapolis, MN #1999 Condon, W., L. Johnson-Shull, D. Kelly-Riley, S. McLeod, N. Stoyan Rosenzweig 1999. Building Before Blueprints: Writing Programs Role in Renovating Undergraduate Education. CCCC Annual Convention. Atlanta, GA @1996 Harrington, J.M., Schneider, G. M., N.C. Stoyan Cummings, D.M., and Rosenzweig, R.F. Recovery and Analysis of Community DNA from Heavy Metal Contaminated Lake Sediments. Am Soc. for Microbiology Annual Mtg. New Orleans, LA. *N.C. Stoyan and Rosenzweig, R.F. Patterns of carbon allocation and energy change among yeast overexpressing glycolitic enzymes. Annual Ye ast Genetics Meeting, Genetics Society of America. Madison, WI. Publications: € McCarthy, K., A. Spring, M. Burg, C. Shehan, N. S.-R. and E. Taylor. The History of Women at the U. of F. (2004) € Place, A.R., N.C. Stoyan R.E. Ricklefs & R. Butler (1989) “The physiological basis for stomach oil formation in Leach’s storm petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Auk 106:687-699 € Castro, G.C., N.C. Stoyan & J. P. Myers (1989) “Assimilation efficiency in birds: a function of taxon or food type?” Comp. Biochem. & Physiol. 92A:271-278 € Place, A.R., N.C. Stoyan & R.E. Ricklefs (1987) “Transient steatorrhea may be responsi ble for pre-fledging weight loss in chicks of Leach’s storm petr el, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Bulletin of Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. € -----------------------------------------------------(1987) “The physiologica l basis of stomach oil formation in Leach’s stor m petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Bulletin of Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. € Anderson, D.A., N.C. Stoyan & R.E. Ricklefs(1987) “Why are there no viviparous birds? A Comment.” Am.Nat. 130:941-7 Articles: The PostHealth Center News and Communications Florida Physician. Society of Florida Archivists. Annotations. Society of Florida Archivists. Key Libraries Staff Laurie N. Taylor Digital Humanities Librarian, Digital Library Center/Digital Services University of Florida Libraries

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ADDRESS: Digital Libr ary Center TEL: 352.273.2902 Smathers Library FAX: 352.846.3702 P.O. Box 117003 EMAIL: Laurien@ufl.edu University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-7003 EDUCATION: Ph.D. 2006 University of Florida, English/Digital Humanities RECENT POSITIONS HELD 2011 Digital Humanities Librarian, Digital Library Center/Digital Services, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2008 – 2011 Interim Director, Digital Library Center, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2007 – 2008 Digital Projects Librarian, Dig ital Library Center, George A. Smat hers Libraries, University of Florida 2006 – 2007 Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Edu cation, University of Florida PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Technical Director, Digital Library of the Ca ribbean & Caribbean News paper Digital Library Technical Director, Florida Digital Newspaper Library Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations Representative, Delegate Assembly of the Modern Language Association Member, American Library Association RECENT AWARDS, FELLO WSHIPS, AND GRANTS € Digital Humanities Collaboration (UF F aculty Enhancement Opportunity Grant; 2012) € Digital Library of the Caribbean, Digital Scholarship and Scholar S upport from Florida International University (FIU) Libraries (F IU Technology Fee Grant; 2011-2013) € Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library (Department of Education; 2009-2014) € America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades (Nati onal Historic Publications and Records Commissions, 2009-2011) PUBLICATIONS Selected Refereed Publications € “Increasing Access to Agricultural Publications Usi ng Digital Repositories and the Semantic Web,” coauthored with Val Davis, Stephen Williams, Dina Benson, Sara Russell Gonzalez and Mark Sullivan. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Digital Libraries 2010. € "Developing an Open Access, Multi-Institutional, International Digital Library," co-authored with Brooke Wooldridge and Mark Sullivan. Resource Sharing & Information Networks 2009. € "Gothic Bloodlines in Survival Horror Gaming," Horror Video Games: Essays on the Fusion of Fear and Play. Ed. Bernard Perron. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009: 46-61. € "Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic Novels," in Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New York: MLA, 2009. € Playing the Past: Video Ga mes, History, and Memory, co-edited with Zach Whalen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008. € "Bioactive," in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co-authored with Sara Russell Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, 2008. € "Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on E ffective Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference, 2008.

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€ "Console Wars: Console and Computer Games," in The Player's Realm: Studies on the Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas He ide Smith. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237. € "Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006). € "Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collabor atively written with Cathlena Martin, in The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29. € "Open Source and Academia," co-a uthored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and Composition Online (Spring 2004): http://www.bgsu.edu/ cconline/tayloriley/intro.html. € "When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the International Journal of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003): http://www.gamestudies.org/0302/taylor/. SELECTED PRESENTATIONS € "The Role of Digital Libraries in Disaster Prep aredness and Mitigation," presentation with Brooke Wooldridge. Association of Caribbe an University, Research and Inst itutional Libraries (ACURIL) 2011 Conference, Tampa, FL: Jun. 1, 2011. € "Save America's Treasures Grant for Flagler College Maps Collaborative with UF," presentation with John Nemmers, John Freund, and Leslee Keys. Society of Florida Archivists (SFA) 2011 Conference, St. Augustine, FL: May 5, 2011. € “UF Smathers Libraries Publishing Services,” presenta tion with Isabel Silver. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Librar y Publishing Services Workshop, Ge orgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA: May 5, 2011. € "Practical Steps Towards Your Lo cal and/or Regional Digitalisati on Project," at the Seminar for Libraries of the Dutch Caribbean Curaao, University of the Netherlands Antilles. Willemstad, Curaao: September 25-6, 2008. € “Choices for Building Digital Libraries.” Presented for The College of The Bahamas’ Virtual Library Committee, The College of The Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas: Mar. 3, 2008.

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PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner Legal name of applicant organization (Sa from Face Sheet) : 1. Legal name of partner organization : Panama Canal Museum, Inc. 2. Partner DUNS number: 144619413 3. Mailing address : Street1: 7985 113th Street, Suite 100 Street2: City: Seminole State: FL Zip+4 : 33772-4785 4 Partner Web address: http://www. panamacanalmuseum.org 5. Partner project contact name : Joseph J. Wood Title: President Telephone number: (850) 668-8936 E-mail: pccjoebev@comcast.net 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): D State Govemment Nonprofit with 501 ( c )3 IRS Status (Other than D County Government Institution of Higher Education) D City or Township Government D Nonprofit without 501 ( c )3 IRS Status (Other than D Special District Government Institution of Higher Education) D Regional Organization D Private Institution of Higher Education D U.S. Territory or Possession D Individual D Independent School District D For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) D Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning D Small Business D Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally D Hispanic-serving Institution Recognized) D Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's) D Indian/Native American Tribal Government D Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) (Other than Federally Recognized) D Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions D IndianlNative American Tribally Designated Organization D Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity D Public/Indian Housing Authority D Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organization's mission? [500 characters] To document, interpret and articulate the role of the United States in the history of Panama, with emphasis on the construction, operation maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and the contributions to its success by people of all nationalities. 8. Describe the partner organization's service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The PCM's constituency is spread throughout the US and around the world, with over 2000 members and donors, consisting primarily of former employees of the Panama Canal; members of the Defense Department and other US Agencies who served in Panama or the Canal Zone; contractors of those agencies; other residents of the Canal Zone and Panama; dependents of all the foregoing; and anyone having an interest in the preservation of the history of the United States in Panama . 9. List the partner's key roles and responsibilities in the project: [1000 characters] The Panama Canal Museum has a shared responsibility with the University of Florida and others in the formulation of plans and ideas, providing funds from its own resources and assisting the advisory group in obtaining additional funding related to the creation and development of a major exhibit to commemorate the 1001h Anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal. The Museum will make available for the exhibit its entire collection consisting of documents, photographs, historical artifacts and other objects and materials, which are expected to comprise a significant portion of the exhibit. The Museum's Board of Trustees is totally

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committed to the project and will provide to the University of Florida/Panama Canal Advisory Group any background knowledge, expertise or historical perspective pertinent to the identification, interpretation and display of the materials to be used in the exhibit. Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization's agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set forth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comply with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines B. Prior to submission of the application, the applicant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a Signed original of this Partnership Statement for the applicant's records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS. PAtA/A;'Hn /Z1u.eUh'l Jd./y Y; :l OJ //

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner. Legal name of applicant organization (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida 1. Legal name of partner organization: Florida Muse um of Natural History, University of Florida 2. Partner DUNS number: 969663814000 3. Mailing address: Street1: 1659 Museum Road Street2: PO Box 117800 City: Gainesville State: FL Zip+4: 32611-7800 4. Partner Web address: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu 5. Partner project contact name: Douglas S. Jones Title: Director Telephone number: 352-273-1901 E-mail: dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): State Government County Government Nonprofit with 501 ( c ) 3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) City or Township Government Special District Government Nonprofit without 501( c )3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) Regional Organization Private Institution of Higher Education U.S. Territory or Possession Individual Independent School District Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) Small Business Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally Recognized) Hispanic-serving Institution Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Other than Federally Recognized) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Indian/Native American Tribally Designated Organization Public/Indian Housing Authority Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organization’s mission? [500 characters] The Florida Museum of Natural History – Understanding, preserving and interpreting biological diversity and cultural heritage to ensure their survival for future generations 8. Describe the partner organization’s service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The Florida Museum of Natural History serves a variety of constituents, including: 1. World-wide researchers 2. The general public (200,000 physical visitors/yr); primary audiences draw from a 50-mile radious of Gainesville, FL (five counti es) in addition to statewide 3. University and college facult y, staff, students and alumni 4. PreK-12 teachers and students 5. 900+volunteers and 900 members 6. The museum has a highly-vi sited website with over 18 million pages viewed per year 9. List the partner’s key roles and responsibilitie s in the project: [1000 characters] The FLMNH will be developing a complimentary exhibit on the natural and geological history of Panama and the Canal Zone. The content and specimens included in this exhibit w ill be derived from the Museum's NSF PIRE project Partnerships in International Res earch and Education. FLMNH's PI RE project is centered upon the widening of the Panama Canal and excavations that FLMNH curators and students are conducting on

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. newly revealed strata. Analysis of data and specimens from these ex cavations will shed new light on the transition of Panama from aquatic to terrestr ial environment over time and the subsequent transcontinental migration of spec ies between North and South America. Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization’s agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set fo rth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comp ly with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines. B. Prior to submission of the application, the app licant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a signed original of this Pa rtnership Statement for the applicant’s records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS.

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner. Legal name of applicant organization (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida 1. Legal name of partner organization: Samuel P. Harn Musuem of Art 2. Partner DUNS number: 969663814000 3. Mailing address: Street1: corner of Hull Rd. and SW 34th St. University of Florida Street2: PO Box 112700 University of Florida City: Gainesville State: FL Zip+4: 32611-2700 4. Partner Web address: http://www.harn.ufl.edu 5. Partner project contact name: Susan Cooksey Title: Curator of African Art Telephone number: (352) 392-9826 x 2141 E-mail: secook@harn.ufl.edu 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): State Government County Government Nonprofit with 501 ( c ) 3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) City or Township Government Special District Government Nonprofit without 501( c )3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) Regional Organization Private Institution of Higher Education U.S. Territory or Possession Individual Independent School District Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) Small Business Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally Recognized) Hispanic-serving Institution Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Other than Federally Recognized) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Indian/Native American Tribally Designated Organization Public/Indian Housing Authority Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organizatio n’s mission? [500 characters] The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art promotes the power of the arts to inspire and educate people and enrich their lives. To this purpose the museum builds and maintains exemplary art collections and produces a wide variety of challenging, innovative ex hibitions and stimulating educational programs. As an integral part of the University of Florida, the museum advances teac hing and research and serves as a catalyst for creative engagement between the unive rsity and diverse local, state, national and 8. Describe the partner organization’s service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The Harn Museum of Art serves the approximately 240,082 residents of Alachua County and outlying popul ations of north central Florida. The museum attracts scholars, artists and visitors from around the world. The museum currently has approximately 841 members. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the general demographics of Alachua County are as follows: Ethnicity: White 73.7% African-American 19.5%, Hispanic or Latino origin 7.3%, Asian4.7%, American Indian and Alaska Natives 0.3%. 9. List the partner’s key roles an d responsibilities in the project: [1000 characters] The Harn Museum of Art will host an exhibition on Panamanian art.The cura tor, Susan Cooksey, will choose the objects and oversee the installation. Registration staff will handle t he crating, shipping and installation. It will include a variety of mediums, and include representative examples of both ancient and contemporary art

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. forms.Work will be borrowed from the partner unit, and outside institutions and private collections. The exhibition will llikely be held in a 2000 square foot sp ace and open in August 2014 (closing date TBD). Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization’s agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set fo rth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comp ly with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines. B. Prior to submission of the application, the app licant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a signed original of this Pa rtnership Statement for the applicant’s records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Specifications for Projects that Develop Digital Products Part I. Complete the appropriate sections: A. Converting Non-Digital Material to Digital Format A1. Describe types and original formats of materials to be sele cted for digitization and quantity of each. The grant will digi tize an assortment of materials in support of glo bal access to the merged collections. Materials to be digitized will include: archival letters, historical photographs, newspapers from microfilm, arti stic and fabric items, oral histories, books, government documents, reports, and other materials that directly suppor t the Centennial events and researcher and outreach needs. Materials to be digitized will be selected by subjec t matter expert curators, librarians, and researchers representing the nee ds and interests of scholarly and public access and the concerns from representatives from both the George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum community. Conservation and preser vation concerns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digitization. An example listing of ma terials to be digitized could include: Photographs: 2,000; Arc hival pages: 1,000; Rare, bound books: 10; 35mm s lides: 15; Printed newspaper pages (singl e broadsheet size): 200; Large format maps and drawings: 22; Microfilm reels (digitiz ed through a vendor, meeting NDNP standards): 10. A2. Identify copyright issues and other potential restrictions with regard to the original non-digital material. Public domain: 100 % of total Permissions have been obtained: % of total Privacy concerns: % of total. Plan to address: Other: % of total. Explain: Permissions to be requested: % of total Plan to address: UF has an established permissions reques t policy, process, and templates for requesting and receiving permissions: http://digital .uflib.ufl.edu/proced ures/copyright/. A3. Describe how the newly digitized material will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to digitized material, and sp ecify what percentage if any of the tot al material will be subject to restrictions. All materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF Digital Collections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu /) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All (100%) materials will be openly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. A4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, w hether purchased, leased or outs ourced, that will be used (e.g., camera, scanner, server, A/D audio or video converter): All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib .ufl.edu/technologies/technologies.htm B. Repurposing Existing Digital Content B1. Describe types and original formats of digital mate rials to be selected for repurposing and quantity of each. Materials will be selected by subject matter experts and in c onsultation with representatives from both the George A. Smather s Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum. Digital preservation conc erns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digital ingest. An example listing of materials to be ingested from born digital files include born digital oral history files with audio and PDF transcripts, web files from the Panama Ca nal Museum, and others already digitally available in the UF Digital Collections (http://ufdc.uf l.edu/) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). B2. Identify copyright issues and other potential restrictions with regard to the original digital material. Public domain 80 % of total Permissions have been obtained: 20 % of total Permissions to be requested: % of total Privacy concerns: % of total. Plan to address:

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Other: % of total. Explain: Plan to address: B3. Describe how the repurposed material will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to repurposed material, an d specify what percentage if any of the to tal material will be subject to restrictions. A ll materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF D igital Collections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu /) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All (100%) materials will be openly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. B4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, whet her purchased, leased or outsourced, that will be used (e.g. MPEG encoder, non-linear editing system, GIS software). All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib .ufl.edu/technologies/technologies.htm C. Creating New Digital Content C1. Describe types of materials to be created in digital form and quantity of each. The grant will digitize an assortment of materials in support of global access to the merged collections. Materials to be digit ized may include: archival letters, historical photographs, newspapers from microfilm, artistic and fabr ic materials, oral histories books, government documents, reports, and ot her materials that directly support the Centennial events and researcher and outreach needs. Materials to be digitized will be selected by s ubject matter expert curators, librarians, and scholars represen ting the needs and interests of scholarly and public access and t he concerns from representativ es from both the George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Mus eum. Conservation and preservation concerns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digitization. An example listing of materials to be digitized could include: Photographs: 2,000; Archival pages: 1,000; Rare, bound books: 10; 35mm slides: 15; Printed newspaper pages (single broadsheet size): 200; Large format maps and drawings: 22; Microfilm reels (dig itized through a vendor, m eeting NDNP standards): 10. C2. Describe plan to obtain releases/permissions from project content creators and subjects. UF has an established permissions request policy, proce ss, and templates for requesting and receiving permissions: http://digital.ufl ib.ufl.edu/procedures/copyright/ C3. Describe disposition of ownership and use rights of new pr oduct. Describe how the new product will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and c onditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to new con tent and specify what percentage if any of the tota l material will be subject to restrictions. All materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF Digital Co llections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu/) and Digital Library of t he Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All ( 100%) materials will be o penly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. C4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, w hether purchased, leased or outs ourced, that will be used (e.g., camera, audio recording equipment, video reco rding equipment, encoding software, server). All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/te chnologies/technologies.htm D. Creating New Software Applications, Inform ation Systems, or other Technology Based Tools D1. Describe type of application or system being created. N/A D2. List the programming languages, pla tforms, software, or other applications and their specifications being used. N/A as this is not a development project. The existing, robust so ftware in use by the Digital Library of the Caribbean (SobekCM Solr/Lucene, SobekCM METS Editor, et c) will be used. Full documentation on t he software is available online: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm D3. Describe disposition of ownership and use rights of new pr oduct. Describe how the new product will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. N/A as this is not a development project. Ho wever, the Digital Library of the Caribbe an software is available as open source an d is also available in comp iled versions for download: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/software D4. Describe how the tool extends or interoperates with existing applications, if applicable. N/A. For more on the ongoing development for existing tools that will be used in this project, see the SobekCM documentation pages: http://ufdc. ufl.edu/sobekcm D5. Describe the development documentation process and technical description of the final product.

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. N/A. For more on the ongoing development for existing tools that will be used in this project, see the SobekCM documentation pages: http://ufdc. ufl.edu/sobekcm Part II. Answer all questions: 1. Specify each type of file format (e.g., TIFF, JPEG, MPEG) to be produced and anticipated quality (e.g. minimum resolution, depth, tone, pixel dimensions, file size, sampling rate) of ea ch. If producing digital image files please list the each type of image file produced (preservation maser, a ccess copy, and thumbnail, if applicable). Preservation Master: TIFF, MPG, OGG, etc; numbers and ty pes depend on the materials selected for digitization Access: JPG, JPG2000, TXT, PRO, METS, etc; numbers and types will depend on the materials selected for digitization Thumbnail: JPG 2. Describe the delivery medium that will be used (e.g. Internet, broadcast, DVD). Internet 3. Describe the underlying software used to manage and/or present digital content or hardware/software dependencies required to run the application or technology tool. SobekCM is the underlying technology (which also utilizes a SQL database, Solr/Lucene, and other technologies). Users will only need a web browser or other internet capable system. For instance, the materials will be accessible through the SobekPH iPhone apps and on mobile browsers. 4. Describe the quality control plan. All materials undergo 100% quality control. All materials are di gitized or digitally ingested and normalized to established dig ital preservation standards. 5. Explain how metadata (e.g. technical, descriptive, adminis trative, preservation,) will be produced and used to describe and manage digital content. Include the standar ds that will be used for data structure, content (e.g. thesauri), protocols, preser vation and administrative information and communication of the content (e.g., MARC, EAD, Dublin Core PBCore, PREMIS,VRA Core Categories, or Categories for the Description of Works of Art). All resources for this project will be loaded into SobekCM and so must conform to both t he national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), as well as our local extensi on schemas. METS files include data about each file in a bibliographic resource, as well as descriptive and administrati ve information about the resource. The bibliographic information can be encoded in either Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) or Dublin Core. Proc essing information, and some bibliographic data, is encoded in a locally-defined schema. In addition to the main SobekCM extension schema, other project and resource specific extension schemas may be created. During the normal workflow at the Digital Library Center, METS files are created by the Quality Contro l Application, and then reviewed by our text te chnicians. Much of the bibliographic data for these METS files are imported from the catalogue record, when one exists. See this documentation fo rmore information: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm/metadata. 6. Describe plans for preservation and maintenance of the digita l files during and after the expiration of the grant period (i. e., storage systems, data standards, technical documentation, migration plans and commi tment of institutional funding). The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Floridaare committed to long-term digital preservation of all materials in the UF Digital Collections, including the IR@UF, and in UF-support ed collaborative projects as wi th the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC). Redundant digital archives, adherence to prov en standards, and rigorous qua lity control methods protect

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4 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. digital objects. The UF Digital Collections provide a compre hensive approach to digital preservation, including technical supports, reference services for both online and offline archived files, and support services by providing training and consult ation for digitization standards for long-term digital preservation. The Libraries support locally created digital resources, includi ng the UF Digital Collections which contains over 200,000 digital objects with over 20 m illion files (as of Sept ember 2011). The UF Libraries create METS/MODS metadata for all materials. Citation information for each digital object is also automatically transformed into MARCXML and Dublin Core. These records are widely distributed through library networks and through search engine optimization to ensure broad public access to all online materi als. In practice consistent for all digital projects and materials supported by the Libraries, redu ndant copies are maintained for all online and offline files. The digital archive is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) Completed by the FCLA in 2005, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) (http://fclaweb.fcla.edu/fda) is available at no cost to Fl orida’s public university libraries. The software programmed t o support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archiv al Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migration on request. As items are processed into the UF Digital Collec tions (UFDC) for public access, a command in the METS header directs a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original files to the FDA is the ke y component in UF’s plan to store, maintain and protect electroni c data for the long term. If items are not directed to load for public access, they do not load online and are instead loaded directly to the FDA. 7. If content will be provided on the Internet, indicate agreement to submit collection level reco rds for digital products to t he IMLS Digital Collections Registry. State reas ons for selecting alternative approaches. All are available for inclusion via a MARCXML record feed, OA I, and general web searches. See this page for more on web crawlers: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm/rob ots. All will be submitted to the IMLS Digital Collections Registry. 8. Provide URL(s) for applicant's previous digital products, if applicable. http://ufdc.ufl.edu http://dloc.com

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5 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Part III. Developing Data Manage ment Plans for Research Projects IMLS encourages sharing of research data. The purpose of this section is to help IM LS understand a grant applicant’s research practices and plans for management of data that would be g enerated through a proposed res earch project. If the proposed project activities will generate datasets with the potential for future re-use or repurposing, answer the following questions. If there is not enough space on the form to provide complete ans wers to the questions, please copy the questions to a separate document, answer them fully, and incorporate the document (clear ly named so as to be identifiable) into the supporting documentation portion of the application. 1. Summarize the intended purpose of the research, the type of data to be collected or generated, the approximate dates when the data will be generated or collect ed, and the anticipated volume of data. n/a This grant is not involved with datasets 2. Does the proposed research activity generating the dataset(s) require approval by any internal or institutional review panel ? If so, has the proposed research activity already been approved? 3. Describe any potential issues with the data regarding confidential or private information about individuals, or proprietary information about organizations. What steps, if any, w ill be taken to protect such information from being disclosed? 4. If additional documentation such as consent agreements or si gned certifications will be co llected along with the data, describe plans for preserving the document ation and ensuring that its relationship to the collected data is maintained. 5. How will you manage intellectual property interests in the da taset(s)? Who will claim ownership of the intellectual property rights to the dataset(s)? How will those clai ms of ownership be communicated to others? 6. Which technologies, instruments or tools will be used to collect or generate the data? Provide details about hardware or software; electronic formats to be used for data capture or stor age; standards or local practices to be used for data content and encoding; controlled vocabularies or other mechanisms that will be used for data normalization and consistency; and any other relevant technical requirements or dependencies for understanding, retrieving, displaying or processing the dataset(s). If the data will be encr ypted at any point in its active or inactive life, explain the reasons for choosing to encr ypt the data and how the decryption key will be stored, protected, and made available if necessary. 7. What metadata will be captured or creat ed along with the dataset(s)? What metadat a standards or schema will be used to express the metadata? Where will the me tadata be stored, and in what format(s)? How will the metadata be permanently associated and managed with the dataset(s) it describes? 8. During the research project, where will the data and meta data be stored, and on what type of media? Who will have access to the data and/or copies of the data during the project? How many backup copies will be maintained during the active project, and how frequently will the backup copies be refres hed? Who will be responsible for data backup? Where will the backup copies of the data and met adata be stored during the project? 9. Once the research project is completed, what is the l ong-term plan for archiving, managing, and making the metadata and dataset(s) available (if applicable)? What steps will you ta ke to prepare the data for sharing (e.g., labeling missing data, standardizing formats, etc.)? 10. Will the dataset(s) and metadata be deposit ed in an institutional repository or a research community’s digital repository? If so, why was this repository selected? Does this repository enforce any access restrictions? When the dataset(s) is deposited, will it be subject to any access embargo period, a nd if so for how long? Does this repository already manage other research datasets and me tadata similar in attributes such as size and format? What preservation and backup procedures are used by this repository? Will the dataset(s) and metadata be maintained in this repository for a predetermined or indefinite period? Who will perform the de posit, including creating additional metadata that may be necessary at the time of deposit? If you do not intend to deposit the dataset and metadata into a repository, but do intend to share the data, what is your sharing strategy?

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6 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. 11. When and how frequently will this data managem ent plan and its implementation be reviewed?

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Supporting Document: References Cited American Association of Museums (2008). Considerations for AAM Accredited Museums Facing Retrenchment or Downsizing Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/survivalguide.cfm#down American Association of Muse ums (2011). U.S. Museums Conti nue to Serve Despite Stress. Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/upload/ACME11-report-FINAL.pdf American Association of Museums. (2012). Frequently Asked Question s About Museums. Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/aboutmuseums/abc.cfm#how_many Merritt, E., & American Association of Museums: Center for the Future of Museums. (2011 November 1). Future Studies 101: Implications Wheel. Retrieved from http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.com/2011/11/futures-studies-101-implications-wheel.html Banjo, S. (2010, May 20). Hit by the Downturn, Museums Seek Bailouts. Wall Street Journal Retrieved from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 4052748703691804575254 321564633624.html Cortez, A., Foster, W., & Smith Milway, K. (2009). No nprofit M&A: More Than a Tool for Tough Times. Retrieved from http://www.bridge span.org/Nonprofit-M-and-A.aspx Dilevko, J., & Gottlieb, L. (2003) Resurrecting a Neglected Idea: The Reintroduction of Library-Museum Hybrids. The Library Quarterly, 73 (2), 160-198. Dilevko, J., & Gottlieb, L. (2004). Evolution of library and museum par tnerships: Historical antecedents, contemporary manifestat ions and future directions. Available from: http://www.powells.com/biblio/959781122286879-0 Dobrzynski, J. H. (2009, December 17 ). RIP: Museum Closures In 2009 -Not A Huge Toll, Actually UPDATED. Retrieved from http://www.artsjournal.co m/realcleararts/2009/12/museum-closures.html Dornseif, K. A. (2001). Joint Use Librarie s: Balancing Autonomy and Cooperation. Resource Sharing & Information Networks 15(1-2), 103-116. Ferrari, M. (Writer), & Ives, S. (Director). (2010, January 24). Panama Canal In A. Pollak (Producer), American Experience Public Broadcasting Services. Florida Museum of Natural History. (2010). Panama Canal Project: Partnerships for International Research and Education. Retrieved from http ://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/panama-pire/ Greene, J. (2009). The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal New York: Penguin Press. International Federation of Library A ssociations and Institutions. (2008). Public Libraries, Archives and Museums: Trends in Collaboration and Cooperation (Professional Reports No. 108). The Hague, Netherlands: A. Yarrow, B. Clubb, & J. Draper.

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Jacobs, J. A. (2008, July). All About Mergers of Nonprofit Organizations. Association Law & Policy Retrieved from http://www.pillsburylaw.com/si teFiles/Publications /E59EB05159610F1A1618CE C694535E42.pdf Kretzmann, J. P., & Mc Knight, J. L. (1993). Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Communitys Assets Evanston, Illinois: Second Printing. Lincoln Y.S., & Guba E.G. (1989). Fourth Generation Evaluation Newbury Park, CA: Sage. McGuiness, A. (2008). Path of Empire: Panama and the California Gold Rush. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Owen, J.M. (2007). Program evaluation: forms and approaches (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press. Panama Canal Museum Board of Directors. (2008). Panama Canal Museum. Retrieved from http://panamacanalmuseum.org/ Reed, R., & Dowd, S., (2009). Merge Minnesota: Nonprofit merger as an opportunity for survival and growth. Retrieved from http://nonprof itfinancefund.org/files/images/ini tiatives/mergeminnesota_mapfor nonprofits.pdf Roosevelt, T. (1910). To The Emplo yees In The Administration Building, Culebra, Canal Zone, November 16 1906. In, Presidential Addresses and State Papers (Vol. 5) (p. 861-869). New York: P.F. Collier & Son. Russell, S. (2008). Putting good will to the test: Nonprof its find mergers can be a messy business at times. Retrieved from http://www. minnpost.com/stories/2008/06/23/2307/putting_good_will_to_the _test_nonprofits_find_mergers_ca n_be_a_messy_business_at_times Wilder Research, & MAP for Nonprofits. (2011). What do we know about nonprofit mergers?. Retrieved from http://www.mapfornonprofit s.org/vertical/Sites/{876C4FB8-E997-480F-BF5BAFAA0F113D9D}/uploads/MAP_LiteratureReview_3-11_revised.pdf Wood, J. (2011, Fall/Winter). Panama Canal Museum Review 11 (2) Seminole, Florida: Panama Canal Museum

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January 13, 2011 Judith C. Russell, Dean University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries PO Box 1170 00 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Ms. Russell: This letter confirms the Florida Association of Museum's (FAM) strong support for the project to merge with the Panama Canal Museum (PCM) and to share information about these activities with others in the museum world. I had been concerned about the future of the collections at PCM having heard that it was closing its operations in Seminole. I know that the University of Florida has the means to support both the collection and cultivate the community who is very engaged in this part of history. Your project will preserve a portion of history that will not be repeated, but that is so important to the expansion of the Canal, World Trade and the study of a workforce. Your creative solution to maintaining and preserving the collection and providing greater access is an unexpected positive result. I'm aware of other museums that have taken steps or are involved in other activities that threaten their collections and future access by the general public. For example, the Brogan Museum board is planning to sell collection items to satisfy their debt, certainly not the intent of the museum's mission. FAM supports the methods outlined in your proposal to care for, grow and exhibit the collections while nurturing its constituents in the way a typical museum would do. Florida has experienced its share of museum closures, most ly handled through best practices. We think showing additional practical examples of how it can be done properly demonstrates our dedication to continuing the practice of the highest museum standards. Members of FAM will be eager to learn about the journey and lessons learned during this interesting and unique process. Actual cases of mergers are not generally shared among museums and this will be an excellent historical case for this purpose. FAM confirms our contribution to the project, to promote two virtual conferences on the topic of mergers and collaborations, hosted by UF Libraries; and, to promote and host presentations to our membership during upcoming annual conferences in 201315. Respectfully, Malinda J. Horton Executive Director

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ITHAKA helps the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. BOARD OF TRUSTEES Kevin M. Guthrie President Henry S. Bienen Chairman Paul A. Brest Vice-Chairman William G. Bowen Nancy M. Cline Ira H. Fuchs Eugene Y. Lowe, Jr W. Drake McFeely Michele Tolela Myers David Pakman Judith Shapiro Jeffrey A. Sine Stephen M. Stigler Charles M. Vest Herbert S. Winokur, Jr January 23, 2012 Judith C. Russell, Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida 535 Library West PO Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy: I am delighted to endorse your proposed Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grant. It is a project I know well, because in the preliminary planning stages, while i was Associate Librarian Congress, your staff met with mine to identify Panama Canal items of national interest and those that would have historical significance internationally. We spoke of the importance of providing Internet access to documents, museum items, indigenous and historical materials, and how the design of the Centennial exhibits and their digitization would take a collaborative effort, nationally and internati onally, to represent the importance of the Panama Canal in the history of the United States. Your plan to partner informally with and utilize information, lesson plans and vital advice from Library of Congress staff to supplement the research supplied by your inte rnational group of Panama Canal curators and historians, will enhance the collaborati on of your more formal grant partners. Engaging a community of subject experts, cultivating and encouraging the variety and type of metadata that can best be supplied by the community involved, and preserving items that reflect cultural, sociological, and ethnographic snapshots of this time in history that was of such significance to World Trade, health, engineering and

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innovation, while modeling how academic environments preserve and make accessible special collections, will be one of the primar y and ultimate outcomes of the grant. As you well have established, the financial ch allenges facing all such collections are monumental; collaboration is key to preser ving our history and our collections. With the potential for an increasing number of museum closures, there is a real need to identify Best Practices in collaboration. Given the administrative and technological infrastructure available on the university campus, and the geographic synergy of merging with a museum located within the state, and given the ability of the University of Florida to support this effort through long-established collaborations, there is an efficiency to developing this model in Florida. Currently your Florida Museum of Natural History is participating in Na tional Science Foundation paleontological research during the Canal expansion project, a nd the strength of your relationships in Latin America has never been stronger. One goal for your project includes establishing the trust necessary to preserve history through the gathering of collective knowledge, oral histories and ephemera from a highly specialized and aging population that spans international cultures. Working with sociologists and museum specialists to articulate the work-life challenges inherent in the early 20 th century Panama through present day opportunities for the expansion helps share the value of this collection while providing access to materials that impact libraries, museums and universities. The project will allow you three years to establish foundation procedures and outcomes that will be shared and discussed at national and international events, gathering breadth through input and dissemination. I applaud your work, and I am happy to add support and encouragement as you progress with your proposal. Sincerely, Deanna Marcum Managing Director, S+R ITHAKA

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H on R obert S. M artin P h .D. P. O. Box 795651 Dallas, Texas 75379-5651 January 25, 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32611-7000 Dear Dean Russell: I am pleased to have the opportunity to write in support of your application to the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a grant to fund the work associated with merging the collection of the Panama Canal Museum with the University of Florida Libraries. Museums often collaborate with libraries and academic institutions to extend the reach of their exhibitions, to provide enhanced access to their collections, and to build intersecting communities of practice. Beyond this, when threatened with the extinction of the institution itse lf, museums have transferred their collections in whole or in part to a library in orde r to ensure that they will continue to be preserved and made available. The project that you propose, however, goes far beyond those kinds of mundane and routine collaborations. You plan to take custody of the entire collection of the museum, which articulate well with your existing collections, creating enhanced synergies. Beyond this, however, you also plan to engage and maintain the community of the museum and sustain its identity and members. This is a unique and challenging proposition. I has the potential to be a model for how libraries can do more than merely assume responsibility for collections when small museums are forced to close. I heartily endorse you proposal and strongly encourage IMLS to give it a high priority for funding. Sincerely, Robert S. Martin Professor Emeritus Texas Woman's University

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The Foundation of the Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere 200 Walker Hall P.O. Box 118030 Gainesville, FL 326 11 tel. 352.392.0796 fax 352.392 53 78 www.humanities.ufl.edu 25 January 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, I am writing to confirm my enthusiastic participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project at the University of Florida (UF) should it be successfully awarded funding by the IMLS. I agree to serve as project evaluator in all levels of planning and implementation during the grant period, 1 October 2012 through 30 September 2015, for $18,963. I am a nine-month faculty member, and this sum represents 36% of my summer salary for three years. Although the bulk of interviewing, formal analysis, and reporting would take place during these summer months, the ongoing ethnographic and observational components of the evaluation would be part of my professional research activities on a year-round basis. I expect to spend 10% of my time during my nine-month employment working on the project, including attending planning meetings, observing collection processing and metadata retrieval, and traveling to meet with PCS members. Having previously conducted qualitative evaluations looking at museum curation, library and publishing innovation, academic scholarly practices, and public engagement with scholarly work, the proposed Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project is an exciting opportunity for me to produce a professional evaluation that builds on my research interests in cultural heritage institutions. The tremendous opportunity for us to preserve and celebrate this important period in history also offers an important activity to bring together research partners from around UF and beyond. I intend through my evaluation to inform a demonstration model of museum-library integrations for the museum and library communities, and also to provide a model for catalyzing cross-campus research and public engag ement initiatives at UF. This falls directly in line with the Center for the Humanities and the Public critical and collaborative discussions of the humanities that reach across and beyond individual disciplines outreach to the community in which we live and teach Thank you for your consideration, and please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions. Sincerely, Sophia Krzys Acord, Ph.D. Associate Director, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere Lecturer, Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Patrice Brown To Panama Canal Advisory Group; Schipper,Rachel A Cc Russell,Judith; de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Thursday, January 26, 2012 10:36 AM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Patrice C. Brown Patrice Brown Archivist, ANDC National Declassification Center National Archives and Records Administration Re: Immediate assistance please Sunday, January 29, 2012 5:39 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Panama Canal Harn speaker costs From de Farber, Bess Gail To de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Monday, January 30, 2012 2:35 PM From: braeburnnc@gmail.com [ mailto:braeburnnc@gmail.com ] On Behalf Of Edith Crouch Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2011 2:45 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Re: FW: A quick favor Dear Rachel, It was a pleasure to talk with you this morning. Thank you for the invitation to be part of the University of Florida's celebration of Panama weekend in 2014. I'd be very pleased to give a talk about molas at this event. I have put together a cost estimate for travel expenses (flights, car rental, meals for arriving Fri. 8/15 and departing Monday 8/18 you mentioned in your email that you would work on hotel costs so those are not included) and have arrived at approximately $1200. I would waive any additional honorarium it is an honor to be invited! I hope this is helpful as you prepare the information for the grant submittal. I would also be very pleased to assist with any mola information compilation as you prepare to exhibit the molas from the Panama Canal Museum's donation and/or others. Many thanks, Rachel! Best regards, Edie FW: Panama Canal Harn speaker costs Monday, January 30, 2012 2:36 PM General Page 1

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Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funded is successful in securing funding from IMLS. I agree to serve as a speaker during the 2014-2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Ronald J. de Heer M.Sc. (Civil Engineering) Senior lecturer Hydraulic Engineering Unesco-IHE (retired) Guest-conservator of the National Dredging Museum, Sliedrecht, The Netherlands

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Subject FW: Immediate assistance please From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Monday, January 30, 2012 2:56 PM ----Original Message ----From: Julie Greene [ mailto:jmg@umd.edu ] Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 5:43 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: RE: Immediate assistance please Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Julie Greene Julie Greene Professor and Director of Graduate Studies History Department University of Maryland at College Park 2131 Francis Scott Key Hall College Park, MD 20742 ph: 301 405 4267 fax: 301 314 9399 ________________________________________ Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 FW: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:58 PM General Page 1

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I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, General Page 2

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Russell,Judith To Jones,Douglas S Cc Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group; de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 11:50 PM Many thanks! Judy -------------------Judith C. Russell jcrussell@ufl.edu Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Douglas Jones On Jan 24, 2012, at 9:44 PM, "Jones,Douglas S" < dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu > wrote: Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:27 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Response from Aims From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 3:28 PM ----Original Message ----From: aimsmcguinness@gmail.com [ mailto:aimsmcguinness@gmail.com ] On Behalf Of Aims McGuinness Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 3:25 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Response from Aims Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Aims McGuinness -Aims McGuinness Associate Professor Dept. of History U. of Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI 53201 0413 Tel: 414 229 4227/Fax: 414 229 2435 Email: smia@uwm.edu FW: Response from Aims Monday, January 30, 2012 2:15 PM General Page 1

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Paul Morgan To Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group Cc de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith; Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 4:03 PM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Paul Morgan, Ph.D Trustee, Panama Canal Museum University of South Florida Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:07 PM General Page 1

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Subject RE: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal From Sobha Jaishankar To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Russell,Judith; Wilson,Kathleen A Sent Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:45 PM Judy, Bess, This is to confirm that the Office of Research will provide a total of $101,797 in support of your application for the IMLS grant, if your grant is funded. Good luck with your proposal! Sobha Sobha Jaishankar, Ph. D. Asst. Vice President for Research, University of Florida, 223 Grinter Hall, PO Box 115500, Gainesville, FL 32611 Ph: (352) 392 8247 Fax: (352) 846 0491 Email: sjaishan@ufl.edu http://www.research.ufl.edu/researchsupport / From: de Farber, Bess Gail Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 4:50 PM To: Sobha Jaishankar Cc: Russell,Judith Subject: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal Importance: High Sobha, So sorry for the delay in getting the attached request to you. Please let me know if you require additional information. opportunities. Best, Bess Bess de Farber Libraries Grants Manager University of Florida Libraries PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Phone: (352) 273 2519; FAX: (352) 392 7251 RE: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal Tuesday, January 31, 2012 8:54 AM General Page 1

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UFFLORIDA George A. Smathers Ubraries 535 Libf, ry West Office of the Dean of University Librar i c PO B x l 17000 ;a incsv illc, PL 32611-7000 352-273-2505 352 392-7251 Fax www.uflib. ufl.edu January 24, 2012 Sobha Jaishankar, Ph.D. Assistant V ice President Office of Research 223 Grinter Hall Gainesville FL 32611 Dear Sobha As we discussed in our meeting earlier this month, I am submitting this request for funding to support the Libraries IMLS National Leadership Grant proposal entitled: "The Panama Canal-Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement: building new models ofstewardship, public engagement and governance for academic libraries." Attached you will find a budget summary ofthe cash request to IMLS for the three-year grant period indicating a total request of$499,995, ofwhich 33.6% ($125,747) is IDC, augmented by a contribution of$101,797 from the Office of Research, which we plan to use for speaker fees in country travel, fabrication of an exhibit OPS for digitization services, and partial salary and benefits for a temporary employee (Friends ofthe Panama Canal Museum Collection Liaison) These expenses directly support the Libraries capacity to complete this project successfully and reflect our discussion and consensus on a means to achieve this result. I also want to reaffirm my understanding fiom our conversation that the contribution fiom the Office of Research is in addition to the Libraries receipt of its portion ofthe IDC, which is 22.6% ofthe value ofthe total direct costs. Please let me know if you have any questions, or feel fi ee to contact Bess de Farber (273-2519, bdefarber@uil. du ) directly, for further information. Sincerely, Attachment: budget summary The Foundation for The Gator Nation 1\11 Ec]unl ( I Institut i on

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Jan. 3 0 201 2 2:5 6 P M Samue l P r octo r O r a l Hist o r y P r g m No.0477 P 2 OFIFLORIDA SAMUEL PROCTOR ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM 241 Pugh Hall Dr. Paul Ortiz, Director P.O. Box 115215 Tamarra Jen.kitl8, Office Manager Gainesville, FL 32611-5215 Office: (352) 392-7168 Fax: (352) 846-1983 www.da $.ufl.edu/history/ oral Dear Judy, Please accept this letter confirming my participation in the Panama Canal Museum prcU<:ct I will continue to coordinate/supervise the effort to record oral histories during each swnmer reunion in 2013, 2014 and 2015 as previously accomplished during past years. I support your efforts to record this jnvaluable information related to the stories behind the building of the Canal and those who lived in the Zone. This project has my full support.....anything else you would like to say about the impol1: ance ofthis project in terms ofboth saving valuable historical material and objects and ensuring the continuance and effectiveness of those who have been the stewards ofthese collections. The Foundationfor The Gator Nation Ilq\lal Aotion WlillUioll

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Paul Sutter To Schipper,Rachel A Cc Panama Canal Advisory Group; de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith Sent Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Paul Sutter Paul Sutter Associate Professor of History Environmental Studies Core Faculty 212 Hellems Hall UCB 234 Boulder, CO 80309 303 492 6208 paul.sutter@colorado.edu Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:08 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Immediate assistance please From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:04 PM From Frank Townsend: ----Original Message ----From: ftown@ce.ufl.edu [ mailto:ftown@ce.ufl.edu ] Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:02 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Re: Immediate assistance please Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Frank C. Townsend FW: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:24 PM General Page 1

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Fine Arts 101 Fine Arts Building C School of Art and Art History PO Box 115801 Gainesville, FL 32611-5801 352392-0201 352392-8453 Fax January 25, 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, I look forward to participating in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if the proposa l is successful in securing funding from IMLS. I agree to serve as a museum expert advisor during the grant period, October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2015, for an annual honorarium of $1,000. This project would seem to be perfect for the University of Florida because of the way that the collection matches the strengths of the library and the academic faculty aligned with the Center for Latin American Studies. There are countless numbers of ways that my students will benefit from the movement of the coll ection to the university and its dissemination to campus groups and the general public. Thi s project has my full support, and I think it is an excellent IMLS project. Sincerely, Glenn Willumson Director of the Graduate Program in Museum Studies Professor of Art History

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Joseph Wood To Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group Cc de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith; Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:28 PM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Joe Wood President Panama Canal Museum Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:40 PM Joe Wood email support (2) Page 1

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Fall 2011 Page 27 Dr. Rachel A. Schipper is the Associate Dean for Technology and Support Services at the University of Florida Libraries and is a board member of the Panama Canal Museum. She coordinates the team who is working to transfer the museum collections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g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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaAbstract The George A. Smathers Libraries (the Libraries) at the University of Florida (UF) requests $499,994 in Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grant (NLG) resources for the period of October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2015 to: 1) actualize, integrate, evaluate, and disseminate museum materials from the Panama Canal Museum (PCM), a 501c3 museum facility located in Seminole, Florida with plans to close and terminate services as of March 31, 2012; 2) lead and facilitate a multi institutional centennial celebration of the opening Panama Canal in 2014 2015 to promote public understanding of the achievement and the heritage resources available for scholarly, educational, and civic purposes; and 3) initiate a national dialog about the potential for best practices in library museum collaborations, strategic alliances, and partnerships. Formal partners include the Panama Canal Museum, the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Also participating are the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, College of Business, College of Fine Arts, College of Engineering, Health Science Center and Legal Information Center, all at UF. Non UF collaborating institutions include the Museum of Science and Industry (Tampa), Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), the Natural History Museum of San Diego, Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam National Archives and Records Administration, and the Association of Southeast Research Libraries, with other participants in development. The ongoing economic downturn has created significant, long term financial pressures for the nonprofit sector, and museums have suffered as government funding and contributed income has decreased. Institutions have more actively explored options ranging from strategic alliances to joint operations to mergers. This project will develop and document the first known example of a full closure of a small museum and the transfer of its community and collections to an academic library within a large public research university. Capturing the strategies, challenges, milestones, and lessons of this collaboration will create a demonstration model for the field (libraries, archives, and museums). This case goes beyond the important transfer and integration of collection assets: it includes integration and “stewardship” of a unique community of some 800 PCM members and 3,000 Panama Canal Society (PCS) members. Many are already active and all are seen as potential leaders, volunteers, legacy ambassadors, and collection donors. Project activities related to the integration process include asset mapping and community cultivation; ongoing documentation and evaluation of the merger process; museum stewardship and internships; collection development, organization, preservation, and digitization; K 12 educational assets, and convening two national virtual dialogs related to mergers and deep collaboration between museums and libraries. The celebration of the centennial of the opening of the Panama Canal (in August 2014) provides a powerful focus and accelerant to collection integration and broad collaboration to support development of physical and online exhibits, guest lectures, and development/dissemination of K 12 curriculum materials. These will serve the immediate university community of 60,000 students and 25,000 faculty and staff from UF and Santa Fe College, as well as families, communities, and tourists within the region, and beyond. Outcomes from the project focus on a successful merger and PCM collection integration, and its documentation and articulation as a fulsome demonstration model. Outcomes will also include and be measured by the continuing vibrancy of the PCM member community, and the facets and impact of the centennial celebration. Deliverables also include a project white paper, IMLS evaluation report, Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Spec Kit (survey results and documentation from member institutions to provide resource guides), journal articles, conference presentations, two national dialogs on library/museum mergers, and a collection that will serve scholars, researchers, and the public for generations to come.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE ONE 1. Applicant Information a. Legal Name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Organizational unit (if different from Legal Name) : George A. Smathers Libraries c. Organizational Unit Address Street1: 219 Grinter Hall Street2: City: Gainesville County: Alachua State: Florida Zip+4/Postal Code: 32611 d. Web Address: http ://www.uflib.ufl.edu e. Type of Institution (Check one): Academic Library Library Association School Library or School District applying on behalf of a School Library or Libraries Aquarium Library Consortium Arboretum/Botanical Garden Museum Library Art Museum Museum Services Organization/ Association Science/Technology Museum Children’s/Youth Museum Special Library Community College Native American Tribe/Native Hawaiian Organization Specialized Museum ** Four-year College State Library General Museum* Natural History/ Anthropology Museum State Museum Agency Graduate School of Library and Information Science State Museum Library Nature Center Zoo Historic House/Site Planetarium Institution of higher education other than listed above Historically Black College or University Public Library Research Library/Archives Other, please specify: History Museum *A museum with collections representing two or more disciplines equally (e.g., art and history) **A museum with collections limited to one narrowly defi ned discipline (e.g., textiles, maritime, ethnic group) 2. Grant Program or Grant Category a. 21s t Century Museum Professionals b. Congressionally Directed Grants c. Connecting to Collections: Statewide Grants d. Conservation Project Support General Conservation Survey Detailed Conservation Survey Environmental Survey Environmental Improvements Treatment Training e. Grants for Learning Labs in Libraries and Museums Select Museum or Library: Museum Library f Laura Bush 21s t Century Librarian Program Select Funding Category: Project Grant Collaborative Planning Grant National Forum Planning Grant Select Project Category: Master’s-level Programs Doctoral-level Programs Research: Early Career Development Continuing Education Programs to Build In stitutional Capacity Scholarship Continuation g. Museum Grants for African American History and Culture h. Museums for America Engaging Communities Building Institutional Capacity Collections Stewardship i. National Leadership Grants Select Museum or Library : Museum Library Select Funding Category: Project Grant Planning Grant National Forum Grant Select Project Category: Advancing Digital Resources Demonstration Library Museum Collaboration Research j. Native American/Native Hawaiian Library Services Basic Grant only Basic Grant with Education/ Assessment Option Enhancement Grant Native Hawaiian Library Services continued on next page...

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE TWO 2. Grant Program or Grant Category (cont’d) k. Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services Programming Professional Development Enhancement of Museum Services l. Sparks! Ignition Grants Select Museum or Library : Museum Library 3. Request Information a. IMLS funds requested: $499,994.00 b. Cost share amount: $559,038.00 4. Museum Profile (Museum Applicants only) a. Is the institution either a unit of state or local governm ent or a private not-for-profit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code and that is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes? Yes No b. Does the institution own or use tangible objects, whether animate or inanimate? Yes No c. Does the institution care for tangibl e objects whether animate or inanimate? Yes No d. Are these objects exhibited by the in stitution to the general public on a regular basis through facilities the institution owns or operates? Yes No e. Is the institution open and exhibiting tangible objects to the general public at least 120 days a year through facilities th e institution owns or operates? Yes No Institution’s attendance for the 12-month period prior to the application: Onsite: Offsite: Year the institution was first open and exhibiting to the public: Total number of days the institution was open to the public for the 12-month period prior to application: f. Does the institution employ at least one professional staff member, or the fulltime equivalent, whether paid or unpaid, who is primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibiti on to the public of tangible objects owned or used by the institution? Yes No Number of full-time paid institution staff: Nu mber of full-time unpaid institution staff: Number of part-time pai d institution staff: Number of pa rt-time unpaid institution staff: g. Fiscal year Revenue/ Support Income Expenses/ Outlays Budget deficit (if applicable)* Budget surplus (if applicable)* Most recently completed FY Second most recently completed FY *If Institution has a budget deficit or surplus for either of the two most recently comp leted fiscal years, please explain the circumstances of this deficit or surplu s in the Text Responses se ction of the application. 5. Project Partners In the space below, please list the names of any organizations t hat are official partners in the project. All official partners must include a completed Partnership Statement Form in this package. Panama Canal Museum; Florida Museum of Natural History; Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art 6. Native Hawaiian Organizati on Eligibility (Native American/Native Hawaiian Programs only) Is the institution an eligible not-for-pro fit organization that primarily serves and represents Native Hawaiians (as defined in Title 20 U.S.C. Section 7517; if yes, see Proof of Eligibility requirements)? Yes No

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expi ration date: 08/31/2013. PROGRAM INFORMATION SHEET – PAGE THREE 7. Institutional Profile (Native Am erican Library Services Grants only) a. Number of hours per week the library collection is accessible to patrons: b. Number of staff dedicated full-time to library operations: c. Number of staff with part-time library duties: d. Number of items in the collection (books, journals, media): e. Number of items checked out per year: f. Does library staff have ac cess to the Internet? Yes No g. Does the library provide public access to the Internet? Yes No h. Amount of operating budget for library services in most recently completed fiscal year: i. Identify which of the following activities will be supported by grant funds (check all that apply): Expand services for learning and access to information and educational resources. Develop library services that provide all users with access to information. Provide electronic and other linkages between and among all types of libraries. Develop public and private partnerships with other agencies and community-based organizations. Target library services to help increase the access and t he ability to use information resources for individuals of diverse backgrounds, with disabilities, or with limited functional literacy or information skills. Target library and information services to help increase the access and the ability to use information resources for persons having difficulty using a library, and for underserved urban and rural communities. j. Maintenance of Effort (check the appropriate response): This year’s expenditures will equal or exceed previous 12 month grant period. Maintenance of effort is assured. This year’s expenditures will not equal or exceed previ ous 12 month expenditure. Maintenance of effort is not assured. Maintenance of effort does not apply. 8. Collection and Material Information (Conservation Project Support Grants only) a. Type of Collection Art History Natural History Anthropology Living Plants Living Animals b. Types of Materials. Use a scale from 1 (primarily affected) to 4 (minimally a ffected) to show which collection types are primarily affected by the project: aeronautics, space/airplanes horol ogical (clocks) photography, negatives animals, live landscape features, constructed photography, prints animals, preserved machinery physical science projects anthropologic, ethnographic maritime, historic ships plants, live archaeological medals plants, preserved books medical, dental, health, pharmacological sculpture, indoor Ceramics, glass, metals, plastics sculpture, outdoor documents, manuscripts military, in cluding weapons textiles and costumes furniture/wooden objects moti on picture, audiovisual tools geological, mineral, paleontological musical instruments toys and dolls numismatics (money) transportation, excluding airplanes historic building paintings historic sites philatelic (stamps) works of art on paper

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaOrganizational Profile (Smathers Libraries and partners: Panama Canal Museum, Florida Museum of Natural History, Harm Museum of Art) The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville, Florida form the largest public library service and information resource system in the state of Florida serving 4 million onsite visitors annually with more than 5.6 million volumes, 7.9 million microfilms, 453,000 e books, 158,695 full text electronic journals, and 1,162 electronic databases. The Libraries’ mission is to support teaching, research, and service. The extensive collections are distributed in eight libraries across campus, the Legal Information Center and an off site book storage facility. (Borland?) Faculty/staff include 96 library faculty, 189 staff and a large contingent of student workers. Public programs, at no cost to patrons, include lectures, exhibits, and events that are vital to the Libraries’ mission and serve over 17,000 participants annually. Since its inception in 1997, the Digital Library Center (DLC) has grown into one of the largest capacity digitization facilities in the southeastern U.S. The DLC manages 300 digital collections containing over seven million pages of content within the UF Digital Collections (UFDC). Collaborative projects with local, national, and international partners transcend institutional boundaries creating virtual treasure troves for researchers worldwide. These include unique manuscripts, antique maps rare children’s literature books theses and dissertations Florida and Caribbean newspapers, oral histories, and online exhibits In 2011, item views to UFDC totaled nearly 26 million. The academic community served by the Libraries includes some 60,000 students and 25,000 faculty and staff at UF and nearby Santa Fe College. The Panama Canal Museum (PCM) in Seminole, Florida, is the only museum in the world founded to preserve the history of the U.S. in Panama with a focus on the Panama Canal (1904 1999). The PCM recognizes the contributions of all nations in this 20th century engineering marvel, focusing on the construction, operation, maintenance, and defense of the canal during its formative years. Activities developed from efforts associated with a Museum Assessment Program grant awarded by the American Association of Museums (AAM) in 2003 include: a Speaker’s Bureau, educational outreach programs (e.g., “Panama Canal Museum in a Trunk”) and conserving and preserving the museum’s collections. Its professional affiliations include American Association of Museums (AAM), the Florida Association of Museums (FAM), the American Association for State and Local History, and the Panama Canal Society (PCS) among others. The Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) was chartered by the Florida Legislature in 1917 and is the state’s official natural history museum. Each year 185,000 guests visit the museum; outreach programs serve an additional 130,000 people, and more than 4.5 million users visit the museum website. With more than 34 million specimens of amphibians, birds, butterflies, fish, mammals, mollusks, reptiles, vertebrate and invertebrate fossils, recent and fossil plants, and associated databases and libraries, the Florida Museum is the largest natural history museum in the southeastern U.S. The museum has 100 full time and 120 part time faculty and staff members and 600 volunteers. The museum’s annual operating budget is $16 million. It is accredited by the AAM, and is an institutional member of the Association of Science Technology Centers, the Natural Science Collections Alliance, FAM and the Southeastern Museums Conference. The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art (Harn) one of the largest university affiliated art museums in the U.S., serves an average annual audience of 84,000. The museum’s collections of nearly 7,000 works of art reflect the breadth of UF’s areas of academic scholarship. With African, Asian, modern and contemporary art and photography collections, the museum contributes to the intellectual vitality of the institution through collaborations with faculty, staff, and students in exhibitions, publications, and programming. The Harn occupies 86,800 sq. ft. including 32,800 in exhibition space and a 250 seat auditorium. A new 26,000 sq. ft. addition dedicated to the exhibition, storage, and conservation of the museum’s extensive collection of Asian art will open in March 2012.

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement: Building new models of stewardship, public engagement, and governance for academic libraries “…you will have earned the right to say, ’that man did his full duty’ because he was connected honorably with the greatest feat of the kind ever performed by America, the greatest feat ever performed by any nation in the history of the entire world.” (Theodore Roosevelt, 1906) The University of Florida (UF) Smathers Libraries (the Libraries) respectfully request $499,994 in IMLS NLG Program funding to: 1) actualize, document, and evaluate the Libraries’ merger with, formalization of governance and common mission for (Dornseif, 2001), and full integration of operations, programs, and collections of the Panama Canal Museum (PCM), currently an independent 501c3 organization with a facility located in Seminole, Florida, which will close in July 2012; 2) lead and participate in a multi institutional centennial celebration of the Panama Canal opening in 2014 2015 to promote public understanding of the achievement and the heritage resources available for scholarly, educational, and civic purposes; and 3) initiate a national dialog about the potential for and best practices in library museum mergers, strategic alliances and partnerships, and other forms of collaboration. This public academic library museum merger integration is understood to be the first example of such a combination at this scale. Capturing the strategies, challenges, milestones, and lessons of this merger will create a demonstration model for the field. Equally, this project will explore the potential for expanded roles for public academic libraries in preserving critical heritage of global significance. Beyond the project’s goal to successfully integrate and preserve the PCM’s collections – ensuring public and scholarly access – it will create a new stewardship model involving the broad community of PCM museum members, volunteers, and constituents already contributing to collection integration and metadata strategies, and forge new collaborations with a rich ecology of aligned institutions holding relevant collections or otherwise involved in Panama Canal heritage. This ecology currently includes as major partners the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) and the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art (Harn Museum). Also participating at UF are the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP), Center for Latin American Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, College of Business, College of Fine Arts, College of Engineering, Health Science Center, and Legal Information Center, with other collaborators in review. Non UF collaborating institutions include the Museum of Science and Industry (Tampa), Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), Historical Museum of San Diego, Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and Association of Southeast Research Libraries (ASERL), with others in development. The PCM collection involved in this merger captures not only one of world’s greatest civil engineering achievements, but as historian Julie Greene (2009) has emphasized, one of world’s extraordinary social engineering achievements. Building and maintaining the Panama Canal project depended on building and nurturing a “human infrastructure” and culture that is a foundational asset in this heritage. This project has the potential to articulate and highlight the Panama Canal heritage such that it becomes a vibrant source of inspiration for world changing achievement; a human story of audacious dreams, political will, and personal sacrifice, and an exemplar of engineering innovation and the soft boundaries of scale (Ferrari, 2010). Realizing this “advocacy” will add a powerful dimension to this demonstration model for academic libraries. Background The Libraries leadership has forged a unique partnership with the board of directors of the Panama Canal Museum (PCM) – “the only museum in the world solely to preserve the history of the American Era of the Panama Canal (1904 1999)” (PCM Board of Directors). In 2009, the PCM board met with leaders of the UF Center for Latin American Studies and the Libraries to discuss a possible merger and transfer of assets. After further exploration, PCM board members approved an integration plan, to take effect some 12 years after the museum’s opening (1998) in a strip mall facility in Seminole, Florida. (Supporting Document: 3)

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 2 The museum’s founders, primarily a group of retired Panama Canal Zone employees, intended to establish and grow a permanent collection of items related to the construction and management of the Panama Canal, capturing a unique period in U.S., Panamanian, and world history. The PCM amassed a permanent collection of more than 12,000 items, largely through the efforts of dedicated volunteers, many of whom are former residents of the Canal Zone now in their 70s and 80s. Formation of the museum arose from the impending return of Canal ownership to the Panamanian people in 1999, and the potential degradation or loss of the Panama Canal heritage for future generations, especially the culture that evolved among some 44,000 residents at the point of transfer. The plan was to begin operations in its temporary location, then conduct fundraising toward construction of a major museum facility. This goal, however, was not achieved. According to PCM President Joe Wood, “…eight years ago, we were told by a museum professional from the American Association of Museums (AAM) that the best way to preserve our unique history would be to partner with an established museum or educational institution…especially in view of a foreseeable and inevitable decline in our membership base” (Wood, 2011). The PCM has operated with a paid executive director and administrative assistance; with the pending closure, the PCM is now volunteer operated. (Supporting Document: 4) In January 2012, an agreement between the PCM and the Libraries to establish the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection at UF was completed, detailing the disposition of assets and joint mission “to document, interpret and articulate the role played by the United States in the history of Panama, with emphasis on the construction, operation, maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and contributions to its success by people of all nationalities who contributed to its success.” The agreement continues, “the mission is of mutual interest to the PCM and the University of Florida and will continue to guide preservation of and access to the collection, as well as support for related research and scholarship.” (Supporting Document: 5) The Libraries will complete accessioning the PCM’s collection prior to closure and subsequent dissolution of PCM’s 501c3 status. PCM collections transferred to date include: 7,000 photos and picture postcards (58%); 2,500 assorted non paper objects, from paintings to pennants, badges to bottles and caps to cups, and objects of daily life in the Zone community (21%); 1,200 memos, letters, reports, scrapbooks, and booklets (10%); 400 maps, posters, and blueprints (3%); 1,100 molas (indigenous Panamanian textile art) (9%); plus 1,677 monographs, 81 serials, 192 yearbooks, and 9 linear feet of unprocessed documents. Also, 475 government documents were sent to the Internet Archive (IA) for digitization. I. Statement of Need This project aligns closely with IMLS Strategic Plan Goal 2 and its objectives: “Promote museums and libraries as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality.” It also aligns with IMLS goals related to placing learners at the center through facilitating library and museum partnerships, practicing exemplary stewardship, and using technology for discovery of the nation’s collections. Factors accelerating action on this project include: The impending closing of the PCM in July 2012 and the need to transfer and integrate its collections, preparation for and celebration of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal in 2014, and the age demographic of the extended PCM community of laypersons/constituents who are primary sources for this cultural heritage. With regard to this community dimension, it is important to note that the “membership” of the PCM and its affiliate, the Panama Canal Society (PCS), is restricted to those persons and families who lived, worked or were educated in the Panama Canal Zone area and their descendants. As these “Zonians” age, their ability to contribute directly to stewardship of the collections and the heritage will be increasingly compromised. Two formal needs assessments have been completed for this project. The first, prepared by philanthropy consultant James Donovan (2011), validates the Panama Canal Museum’s continued interest and willingness to participate and invest in a full integration process with the Libraries and UF, and outlines needs and strategies for supporting full integration activities. The second is a study by UF graduate student in Museum Studies Kim Tinnell (2011): A Guide to Processing, Handling, Condition Reporting, Photographing, Storing, Allowing Access to, Exhibiting, and Inventorying the Museum Collection in a Library Setting. This guide was

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 3 developed to help define stewardship needs of PCM’s collections and the challenges posed by accessioning museum objects into a library setting (Supporting Documents: 6 and 7). Identified audiences and corresponding needs fulfilled by the project: (Supporting Document: 2) Libraries/ Archives/Museums and LAM professionals in the US: The ongoing economic recession has created significant, long term financial pressures for the nonprofit sector overall, and museums have suffered as government funding and contributed income has decreased. More than 70% of museums surveyed by AAM (2011) reported moderate (39%) to severe (14%) or very severe (18%) economic challenges. In 2010, government support decreased in 52% of museums, and investment income decreased in 37% of museums (AAM, 2011). In cases where economic pressures endanger a museum’s ability to sustain operations, the option of merging, whether with a museum or a different type of knowledge/heritage stewardship institution, is becoming a viable alternative to closing, particularly as more knowledge, experience, and best practices emerge from the field. AAM’s 2008 re issued document Considerations for AAM Accredited Museums Facing Retrenchment or Downsizing foresaw the need to support the field as the economy shifted to recession. At the same time, leaders of healthy organizations are recognizing that such combinations can also proceed from strength, seeking merger opportunities to leverage financial stability and solid organizational assets to meet current and devise more ambitious missions (Cortez, et al., 2009). But overall, “…information is lacking on merger frequency, (and) outcomes…” (Russell, 2008) even though there is a critical need to stimulate dialogue and inform library leadership about current museum/library mergers and other forms of deep collaboration. AAM collects only anecdotal information on museum closings and on institutions who have communicated that they are engaged in or planning mergers. AAM’s media relations department provided a list of 26 museum closings during 2009 (Dobrzynski, 2009), with a more recent list provided by AAM’s information center summarizing nine museum mergers since the start of the recession in 2008. Further, exploratory merger discussions between institutions are typically confidential, making documentation of this kind of activity almost impossible. As a result, we do not have a helpful inventory or analysis of merger activity, or what due diligence approaches and action strategies have succeeded. There also is evidence that some mergers have failed, and that the institutions involved have parted ways after a period of joint operations. Altogether, these factors contribute to a perception that mergers are a “last resort,” while making it difficult for leaders to learn the inner workings of and be inspired by this business strategy (Jacobs, 2008). Academic Libraries: The field would benefit greatly from well documented merger case studies involving libraries, museums, and archives, especially if they provide transparency and ongoing formal assessment of the merger process itself and the integration of assets, talent, operations, and processes which follows. Equally, examples of public academic libraries accepting collections that may be disbursed due to museum downsizing or closures need documentation. In the known universe of approximately 17,500 U.S. museums (AAM, 2012), the number of these merger events is relatively small, making the current sample size an unreliable source for dialog, research, and planning. The Libraries PCM integration presents an opportunity to develop an in depth case study. In particular, the UF PCM case goes beyond the important transfer and integration of collection assets: It includes integration of the ephemeral but critical asset of the people whose life experiences, culture, skills, expertise, and passion for the Panama Canal are central to this heritage. Managing (and supporting) a large corps of active and potential volunteers (potentially some 800 PCM and 3,000 Panama Canal Society members) is certainly atypical for academic libraries. But the member volunteer energies involved, for the interpretation of collection materials and for providing educational outreach programs to communities, are critical to project success. Therefore, the project will strive to preserve and extend relationships with PCM’s current stakeholders and constituents, who are now geographically dispersed around the U.S. as well as in Panama. To fully integrate PCM within the Libraries and the greater UF community, project leaders will pursue an asset based

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 4 community development model as codified by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). This model outlines a multitude of benefits and increased capacities for actualizing organizational missions through asset identification, mapping, and leveraging for all participating institutions. The result will help assure continuity and a sense of ownership for PCM and PCS members by their participation in oral histories, collaborative metadata creation, tagging of collection materials, fund development activities, and educational outreach opportunities. Separately, there is a need to inform the broader public about the project, the import of its goals, and the solid stewardship of UF in order to sustain the collection and its programming for the benefit of future generations. It is critical to build credibility with current and future donors of funds, and, as important, donors of new collections through the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection (FPCC) at UF. “Donors worry about the financial health of ‘rescuers’ (and) want to ensure collections are maintained, kept intact and used for their original intent” (Banjo, 2010). The presence of the Panama Canal Collection at UF has already begun to attract additional financial support (over $100,000 in 2011). In some cases these new funds came from donors who were long term supporters of the PCM and want to continue to see the PCM collections grow. In other cases, donors are individuals who see the PCM’s selection of UF as an integration partner as a source of long term confidence that this heritage will be preserved and accessible, helping them consider the deposit of their private Panama Canal collections.Scholars, researchers, teachers, students, and general audiences seeking to have access to primary resources about Panama Canal history: Historically, the PCM attracted, on average, only about 30 research inquiries per year and its collection was largely inaccessible except for items that had been exhibited since 2002 at the museum site in Seminole, Florida. As the accessioning body, the Libraries have committed to expanding access to and interpreting this collection to engage new generations in understanding the significance and lessons of the Panama Canal. The Libraries are noted for the extraordinary Latin American Collection (LAC), which contains over 551,000 items (including monographs, volumes, microfilm, historical documents, maps/atlases, and digital materials) and receives some 9,000 visitors per annum. The LAC supports UF’s Title VI Center for Latin American Studies the second largest program in the country, which draws on the expertise of over 150 distinguished faculty affiliates from across UF. The LAC is a major contributor to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) which is hosted by the Libraries, and features the Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library. As part of its traditional focus on Latin America, the Libraries had long given special attention to Panama, including over 2,200 titles related specifically to Panama in the LAC, and two relatively smaller historical collections related to the period of the construction of the Panama Canal: the Leonard Carpenter Panama Canal Collection and the Laura Mabel Brooking Collection These materials with those from the PCM (2,245 items) make up dLOC’s Panama and the Canal digital collection which received 714,674 item views during 2011. The inclusion of the PCM collection will expand the LAC’s Panama materials to over 12,000 assets, and enable the LAC to document the entire period of U.S. involvement in the Canal (1904 1999). Over the course of two years, 20 graduate students in UF’s Museum Studies program will intern with the PCM and support preparation exhibits for the centennial celebration in 2014. Anticipated users of the PCM collection at UF and related materials include faculty, students, and outside scholars from a number of fields, including Anthropology, Art, Business, Economics, Engineering, International Relations, Sociology, and History. In addition, the finding aids and dissemination activities included in this project will address the need for other extant Panama Canal historical archives to be aware of and access these materials (Supporting Document: 8). Three quarters of the collection consists of photographs or artifacts with minimal documentation or metadata as they were assembled by former Zone residents and their descendants from their own private holdings. This makes participation by the PCM’s expert volunteers in the processing of the collection especially critical. As discussed by Dilevko and Gottlieb (2004), linking the acquisition of objects from community members to a related event (here, the collections integration and processing and the centennial celebration) is a key strategy by which, "the library is also establishing a

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 5 meaningful relationship with its user community that reflects community interests and connects these interests to the library collection." The centennial celebration of the Panama Canal opening has standing well beyond being a milestone in the integration of the PCM at the Libraries: it should act as an important catalyst for the contribution of new stewardship energies by the PCM community. 2. Impact As noted earlier, this project represents the first known effort to fully integrate a small museum’s collections and programming within a public academic library context, with the unique dimension of integrating the extended PCM community and its stewardship energies directly into the effort. The demonstration model, disseminated through a white paper and Association for Research Libraries (ARL) “Spec Kit” (survey results and documentation from member institutions to provide resource guides), among other outlets resulting from this project, will document the strategies employed, the expertise convened, and the networks of institutional collaboration utilized in this merger and centennial celebration (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, 2008). The project’s evaluation process will document not only the organizational issues of merging, and asset and systems management strategies and challenges, but also the more intimate social, cultural, and human dimensions of the integration experience. (Supporting Document: 9) The white paper also will inform two national virtual dialogues, journal articles, presentations at conferences, the first ARL Spec Kit on the topic of mergers, a project final report, and other deliverables. As described by Reed and Dowd (2009), the community driven nature of nonprofit organizations makes traditional quantitative and impact based measurements difficult. To address this scenario and ensure full accountability in the demonstration model, the evaluation designed for this project draws widely on the principles of Fourth Generation Evaluation (Lincoln and Guba, 1989), which takes into account the multiple and complex voices in any organizational environment. The evaluator will take the role of trusted messenger, and will act independently of the project team leaders and advisory board to collect critical feedback from all involved parties (PCM, volunteers, curatorial team, project partners, and other participants). This evaluation feedback will be used to inform and strengthen the ongoing implementation of the project, as well as provide evidence of impact and accountability in final reporting. In this ‘interactive’ evaluation model (Owen, 2007), the evaluator will determine questions and information relevancy in a collaborative fashion in conversation with project participants, and work with Libraries staff as needed to support larger scale evaluation activities (e.g., surveys). All formal interview and survey instruments will be piloted, and all resulting data and interpretations will be verified with respondents. The evaluation will be conducted under the auspices of UF’s Institutional Review Board, maintaining required confidentiality protocols. Evaluation activities include the following: The integration of museum/library entities. Through observation of meetings and activities and interviews with team leaders, the evaluator will analyze the nature of integration of merged collections and programs, the benefits and liabilities associated with the merger from the standpoint of UF and PCM, and the satisfaction of involved participants. Leveraging of lay expertise within an academic library setting. Through interviews and focus groups with PCM members, and observations of key meetings and activities, the evaluator will examine their level of engagement in the pre and post merger process and the PCM members’ sense of ownership. Funding, governance structures, and branding for project success and sustainability. The evaluator will verify deliverables and outputs (including financial accounts, meeting minutes, and digital objects) to ensure project projections of funding, governance structures, and communication tools. These outputs will be used to elicit precise, grounded feedback during focus groups with various participant groups to determine whether these retain the vision different parties intend for the project as a whole. Significant scholarly and public interest and awareness in the history of the Panama Canal Zone. During the grant period, the evaluator will quantify attendance at centennial and educational events (using gate

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 6 counts), online use of digital materials (using automated UF collection visitation software), press and other coverage of the centennial celebration and museum collection re launch (using Google alerts and internet search tools), related scholarly publications (through citation search tools), and complimentary educational and program materials produced for local audiences, schools, and community groups. During centennial activities, a randomized survey will be used to collect audience feedback, to be complemented by ongoing textual analysis of related correspondence received (in any form). 3. Project Design The project will bring librarians, museum experts and curators, scholars, collaborating institutions, Zonians, and broader community members together on a range of activities from collection development to community programming to education and curriculum support. (Supporting Document: 11)Pre Grant Period Inventory, Accessioning and Planning The 24 month planning phase now underway and funded jointly by the Libraries and PCM has completed the following: negotiation of integration and loan agreements, collection transfer and inventory, initiation of examination and conservation of items, review of potential exhibit materials, establishment of advisory and Friends boards, and initiation of fundraising activities and networks established with program partners. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Record Administration, Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), and Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam began an international dialogue to discuss collaborative and mutually beneficial steps. (see Schedule of Completion) Pre grant period planning goals included establishment of permanent endowments to support processing and digitization of Panama Canal collections; utilization of a panel of international experts to advise concerning the centennial celebration; creation of the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection and cultivation of knowledgeable PCM members to add metadata to digital records and share experiences through presentations and information dissemination; continuance of the PCM’s “Museum in a Trunk” program to K 12 schools; solicitation of new collection items; and support of all fundraising activities. (Supporting Document: 10) IMLS Grant Period Project Activities (tracked in the Schedule of Completion by alphabetic identifier) (A) Governance, Advisory Board, Library Leadership Board, project team planning and review meetings: A regular review cycle will assure oversight and continuity of project elements across activities below. (B) Asset inventory/mapping and community cultivation: An ongoing asset inventory will become a core activity for capturing and using the full complement of resources available to support increased discovery and knowledge about Panama Canal history, and involve the newly formed Friends of the PCM Collection, the Panama Canal Society (PCS), other UF participating entities, many of the 26 national and international partners in dLOC, and many others. Cultivation of the PCM and PCM memberships will utilize a broad range of strategies from governance roles to volunteer recognition, to visitation programs, and to centennial programming and speaker bureaus. (C) Oral histories : Oral History Program students will continue to capture, process, and transcribe oral histories of former Zonians (example at: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100381/00001/ ). Some portions of these oral histories will be used within a variety of the centennial and online exhibits. (D) Professional development internships: Twenty UF Museum Studies students/interns (10 each in 2012 2013 and 2013 14) will process and organize PCM collection items and assist with database inventory. Spring classes of graduate students will help to plan exhibits beginning two years prior to the centennial – reviewing items for display, working on the flow and logic for the exhibits, physically creating signage, labels, and brochures, and assisting in the design of digital and online content presentation. (E) Collection integration and stewardship: Processing of the collection will be coordinated through utilization of existing staff from library departments including Gifts and Exchange, Conservation and Preservation, Cataloging and Metadata, Government Documents, and Digital Services in conjunction with the Latin

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 7 American subject specialists. The Libraries will draw upon expertise from all advisors to build the collection, including the National Archives and Record Administration and the Library of Congress. (E1) Preservation and digitization of materials: Materials in brittle physical condition or which require special handling will be digitized at the Digital Library Center (DLC). Books, government documents, and text items that are generally in good condition will be outsourced through the Internet Archive and other service bureaus). As the transfer of collections and materials continues, many items from the Panama Canal Museum will, in the future, find their way to new users online. (E2) Digital resources and exhibits: As exhibit content is digitized and historical information is recorded for web presentation, partnerships with other libraries and museums will increase online access to historical resources. dLOC will continue to acquire and make globally accessible new resources related to Panama and the Canal. Materials will be digitized in libraries and museums, both for preservation purposes and to enable remote access to patrons in place of or in addition to in person visits. (E3) Center of Excellence for government documents: The Libraries have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Association of Southeast Research Libraries (ASERL) to serve as the Center of Excellence for federal documents related to the Panama Canal that will benefit the Federal Depository Library Program, its participants, and the global community. Efforts will continue to collect, organize, and provide broad public access to legacy government documents related to the Panama Canal, including technical reports, maps, and engineering plans from 1856 through 1999, many of which will be full text searchable. The partnership agreement outlines responsibilities for maintaining public access to the digital collection. Included in the project is access to the Panama Canal Commission (PCC) and its predecessor, the Isthmian Canal Commission (ICC), as well as all Federal and officially related publications from the Canal. (F) Centennial events, exhibits and lectures: Joint exhibits of information and artifacts are planned for the 100th anniversary celebration. 1) Exhibits will be presented at FLMNH displaying paleontological specimens excavated from the current expansion of the Canal (prior to its expected flooding for maritime passage in late 2014). The FLNMH received a $3.2 million award from the National Science Foundation for students and faculty to “advance knowledge of the extinct faunas and floras of the ancient Neotropics based on the new fossil discoveries along the Canal” through biological, paleontological, and geological outreach and research (Florida Museum of Natural History, 2010). A companion exhibit highlighting natural history objects from the PCM collections will complement these fossil discoveries. 2) An exhibit of Kuna Indian molas is planned with the Harn Museum, accompanied by a lecture from renowned expert and author, Edith Crouch. There are over 1,500 molas in the transferred collection, many of which were collected during the years from 1940 1980. 3) Other exhibits coinciding with the centennial year will be presented in the College of Engineering (construction of the Canal), the School of Business (world trade), the School of Health Science (history of medicine), and the Libraries (diversity in work and life). A number of seminars and panel discussions will populate campus during the centennial year, with the Center for Latin American Studies annual seminar highlighting Panama. (G) K 12 curriculum support: The College of Education Library will coordinate the writing of lesson plans to supplement and support centennial exhibits, coordinating with the requirements of the Florida comprehensive assessment test. These lesson plans will focus on arts, history, geography, science, and engineering. The PCM created a “Museum in a Trunk” program incorporating music, art ( molas ), history, and lesson plans; the new Friends body will focus on continuing the program and augmenting the information in the trunks with school presentations (already available on campus for school use within Alachua County). The Center for Latin American Studies currently coordinates the trunk loan program. (H) Professional/scholarly communications: PIs, UF staff, advisory group members, and experts will pursue opportunities to speak, participate on panels, present posters, etc. at a range of professional meeting in the libraries, archives, public humanities, and museum fields, as well as publish, blog, etc. in areas of museum stewardship With the counsel of the museum experts team, the UF Director of the Graduate Program in Museum Studies, and the FLMNH and Harn Museum, publications will document best practices in collection

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 8 stewardship, programming, and digitization (e.g., Master’s Thesis by Kim Tinnell); nonprofit merger and governance; and multi type institution collaboration strategies. (H1) Two national virtual dialogs: Using a web conferencing system (e.g., Go To Meeting) the Libraries will convene and facilitate two sessions related to mergers and deep collaboration between museums and libraries. In preparation, participants will receive a preliminary draft of the project’s white paper. The agenda will be developed by the museum/library experts team and focus on challenges and solutions during the project, incorporating other examples from the library/museum fields. 4. Project Resources: Personnel, Time, and Budget/Management The Libraries requests $499,994 in IMLS funding to support: three temporary positions; PT Communications Assistant, PT Project Assistant, and partial funding for the FPCMC Liaison ($196,141); library/museum expert consultant fees ($40,500), external evaluation ($18,782), and exhibit coordination and digitization staff ($57,577). Additionally, IMLS funds will support Advisory Board convening, honoraria for museum experts/speakers, student workers for digitization and exhibition preparation, travel for related conferences and indirect costs ($186,994). Total UF cost share contribution ($559,038), includes cash contribution from the Office of Research and effort contributions by 22 Libraries’ staff members. Key leadership and human capital resources include the following. (Supporting Documents: 2, 12, 14, 15)Panama Canal Centennial Advisory Board: This board will continue planning activities related to programs and events presented by the Libraries, partners, and participants in 2014 15. Board members will serve additional roles as guest lecturers, exhibit researchers, and conduits to FPCMC, PCS, and museum groups. Members include: Patrice Brown, senior archivist in Transportation and Panama Canal records with the Evaluation and Special Projects Division of the National Declassification Center at National Archives and Records Administration. Ronald de Heer, guest conservator for the Nationaal Baggermuseum in Sliedrecht (the Netherlands), worked on the design and construction of the museum’s major Panama Canal exhibition. Julie Greene, Ph.D Professor of History at the University of Maryland is the author most recently of The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal Douglas S. Jones, Ph.D., director, professor, and paleontologist at FLMNH, has been working on understanding fossils resulting from the current Canal Expansion Project. Aims McGuinness, Ph.D., author of Path of Empire: Panama and the California Gold Rush and curator of the 2010 Smithsonian exhibition, "Panamanian Passages/Pasajes Panameos." Paul W. Morgan, Ph.D., historian, completed his dissertation, The Role of North American Women in U.S. Cultural Chauvinism in the Panama Canal Zone. 1904 1945, at Florida State University, and trustee of the PCM. Paul S. Sutter, Ph.D., historian, published articles/book chapters on the subject – e.g., “Nature’s Agents or Agents of Empire? Entomological Workers and Environmental Change during the Construction of the Panama Canal." Frank Townsend, Ph.D., UF professor emeritus, Civil Engineering, and “Zonian” was born and raised in the Zone; both grandfathers received Roosevelt Medals. Joseph J. Wood, the PCM president and founding member; former director, Office of Executive Administration and Chief, Administrative Services Division; deputy executive secretary of the Canal Zone, Panama Canal Commission. Other Speakers: Keynote Speaker (TBD) has been invited to take part in the centennial celebration. The anticipated speaker has performed extensive research on the Canal and is a widely respected author (pending formal confirmation). Edith Read Barkowitz Crouch author and Zonian has published The Mola: Traditional Kuna Textile Art Role: Harn Museum; book signing and reception host. Museum Experts Team and Evaluator: David R. Curry, MSLS, Managing Principal, davidrcurryAssociates; Advisory Board, Center for the Future of

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 9 Museums, AAM. Role : Strategy consultant. Wit Ostrenko, president, Museum of Science and Industry in Tampa (5th largest science center and largest children’s science center in the US). Role : Museum advisor. Glenn Willumson, Ph.D., director of UF’s Museums Studies Graduate Program. Role : Museum advisor. Sophia Krzys Acord Ph.D., sociologist and associate director of UF’s Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Role : External evaluator.Samuel Proctor Oral History Program: Paul Ortiz, Ph.D., director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, has overseen completion of some 50 oral history interviews; and each summer, leads a team of students to conduct interviews with PCS members.Smathers Libraries: Judith C. Russell, Principal Investigator, is Dean of University Libraries at UF, a position she has held since 2007, leading eight university libraries, with a $27 million budget and 225 staff. Role: Leader and resource allocator. Rachel A. Schipper, Ph.D., Co Principal Investigator, holds graduate degrees in librarianship, museum studies, education, and computer science. During her years as dean, Schipper designed and coordinated the building of libraries with museum and gallery spaces, often working with donor groups for exhibitions and collections. Role: Coordinator for collection transfer and processing, personnel supervision, and centennial event initiator. Bess de Farber, grants manager, and facilitator. Role: Organizer and facilitator of two virtual national dialogs. Chelsea Dinsmore, international documents librarian, leads the Panama Canal Center of Excellence. Role: Digitization and processing of exhibit materials. John Freund, book and paper conservator. Role: Receive/inventory deliveries, ensure proper storage and document condition, supervise students and volunteers to correct and complete the inventory database. Samuel T. Huang, associate dean of advancement. Role: Corporate and private fund initiation and support. Paul S. Losch, subject specialist in Latin American Studies for the Latin American Collection. Role: Research, event and exhibit support; student supervision. Randall Renner, DLC operation and digital projects manager. Role: Digitization and student supervision. Lourdes Santamara Wheeler, exhibits coordinator (new position as of January 2012), previously the museum and special projects coordinator in the DLC. Role: Exhibit preparation/fabrication/digitization; liaison with Museum partners; Museum Studies student coordinator. Nina Stoyan Rosenzweig, Health Science Center Libraries archivist and historian. Role: Exhibit research and preparation. Laurie N. Taylor, Ph.D., digital humanities librarian for the UF Digital Collections. Role: Digitization coordination and collection support. 5. Communications Plan UF and its partners will create and widely disseminate information about the activities and outcomes of the project, with all project partners and participants promoting the project to local, national, and international audiences. As leading experts in the Canal historical resources, advisors will effectively and authoritatively promote the project as well. The extensive and growing international network of partnerships and participants in this project also will contribute to promotion. Project activities will be announced on relevant web sites, through a range of social media channels, and in publications of UF and its collaborating institutions (e.g., http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/news http://www.youtube.com/user/UFlibraries and http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/cont ent.php?pid=139813&sid=1194381 ). The Libraries Director of Communications, Barbara Hood, with support from the proposed communications coordinator, will provide professional promotional and marketing services to implement many of the publicity strategies listed above. Project participants also will make presentations at professional conferences and meetings, publish in academic journals, and will lead and contribute to e discussions. Project team members plan to present the project model at conferences and through publication outlets, e.g., Association of College and Research

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of Florida 10 Libraries (ACRL), American Library Association (ALA), Florida Association of Museums, AAM, Imagining America, and the Center for the Future of Museums. UF will create and maintain an online library finding aid (LibGuide), which includes documentation and descriptive information about the project, as well as a means for contributed comments. This online project site will inventory and include papers and presentations developed by project personnel. A publicly accessible white paper (hosted in the UF Institutional Repository ) and IMLS final report/evaluation results also will share results. An ARL Spec Kit will be developed by those who have participated in the grant experience including the evaluation results, identifying best practices for the merger of museums and libraries and the cultivation of the communities that serve their collections. For the convening of two virtual national dialogs, the Libraries plan to promote these sessions via AAM, FAM, ASERL, FLA, and a variety of listservs with subscribers who are likely to participate. To increase discovery of and access to Panama Canal Zone resources, UF will contribute digital objects and metadata to digital repositories and collections. UF digital collections are automatically disseminated via OAI and MARCXML feeds to multiple harvesters and repositories including: Trove, NINES, 18thConnect, WorldCat, OAIster, and other aggregators. Collections are optimized for Google harvesting. 6. Sustainability In early 2012, a permanent change was made in the Libraries’ governance structure with the appointment of two members of the Friends of the Panama Canal Collection (FPCC), the newly formed membership entity for PCM members to the Library Leadership Board. This action, the first of its kind for a held collection at UF, confirms the Libraries’ long term commitment to its full and active integration into the Libraries. The FPCC and the Library Leadership Board will continue to fundraise; support events, presentations, and outreach (performed by staff and volunteers); as well as seek funding to support the current collection and seek new Panama Canal collections. (Supporting Document: 13) To date, four funds have been established at the UF Foundation with stated goals including the digitization, preservation, and processing of PCM collections; planning and programming for traveling and online exhibits; hosting events including those associated with the Centennial; acquisitions of related materials to enhance the collection; printing, press releases, and the continued promotion of the PCM integration with UF; and other related activities. At the time of submission, these funds totaled $115,709, including $102,698 in an endowment. The Libraries development team has set a target goal of $1.5 million for these funds, and will engage in ongoing fundraising activities to provide the resource for the purposes described in the funds. Libraries permanent staff will provide infrastructure support in a variety of ways, including updating websites and LibGuides for the Panama Canal Collection. The Director of Communication will promote the collection through newsletters, web site announcements, collaboration with partners during annually established events such as Hispanic Heritage Month, and the support of exhibits, presentations, and materials for the annual Panama Canal Society Reunion. Beyond the year of the centennial, international relationships will broaden, and policies for the exchange and loan of exhibit materials will be established. Volunteers, experts, Latin American Collection librarians, and student assistants will continue to build and make accessible the digital collection via dLOC. As a regional federal depository, the Libraries’ current Center of Excellence partnership with ASERL represents a commitment to retain all government documents related to the Panama Canal in perpetuity. Overall, this merger is driving substantive and permanent change in Libraries operations, exhibits, governance, volunteer management, and campus, national, and international relationships. The planned national virtual dialogs, white paper, ARL spec kit, journal articles, and conference presentations will make important contributions to the field in support of collaborations, including mergers, which preserve endangered collections, extend stewardship models, and leverage the associated knowledge for research, scholarship, and civic advancement.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/01/2012 Through: 09/30/13 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 5% of $200,09 6 $10,005.00 $10,005.00 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 25% of $128, 625 $32,156.00 $32,156.00 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 25% of $45, 320 $11,330.00 $11,330.00 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 6% of $46,29 7 $2,778.00 $2,778.00 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communic. Assist. 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 37% of $48,000/9 Mth Fac/Summ $6,102.00 $6,102.00 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $4,0 72 $4,072.00 $4,072.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $42,521.00 $42,521.00 SUBTOTALS $67,799.00 $108, 704.00 $176,503.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $83,484.00 $3,048. 00 $19,409.20 $22,457.20 30 % of $49,320.00 $5,348. 00 $9,448.00 $14,796.00 31.91 % of $43,700.00 $13,4 35.00 $509.00 $13,943.00 SUBTOTALS $21,831. 00 $29,366.20 $51,196.20 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 $2,143/da y $13,500.00 $1,500. 00 $15,000.00 SUBTOTALS $13,500.00 $1,500.00 $15,000.00

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to Orl, FL 2 2 $600.00 $80.00 $680.00 $680.00 SUBTOTALS $6,000.00 $680.00 $6,680.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 SUBTOTALS $2,000.00 $2,000.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $251,379.80 $37, 339.68 $47,123.93 $84,463.61 % of % of SUBTOTALS $37,339. 68 $47,123.93 $84,463.61 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $148,469.68 $187,373.73 $335,843.41 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $148,469.68 $187,373.73 $335,843.41 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $111,130.00 $140,24 9.80 $251,379.80

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/1/2013 Through: 9/30/2014 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 5% of $200,09 6 $10,005.00 $10,005.00 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 25% of $128, 625 $32,156.00 $32,156.00 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 50% of $4 5,320 $11,330.00 $11, 330.00 $22,660.00 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 12% of $46,29 7 $5,556.00 $5,556.00 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communic. Assist. 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 37% of $48,000/9 Mth Fac/Summ $6,102.00 $6,102.00 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $10,8 12 & $4,072 $10,812.00 $4, 072.00 $14,884.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $45,009.00 $45,009.00 SUBTOTALS $81,389.00 $122, 522.00 $203,911.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $94,814.00 $3,048. 00 $22,456.97 $25,504.97 30 % of $54,896.00 $6,182. 00 $10,286.80 $16,468.80 26.01 % of $54,201.00 $13,7 16.00 $382.00 $14,097.00 SUBTOTALS $22,946. 00 $33,125.80 $56,070.80 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 $2,143/da y $13,500.00 $1,500. 00 $15,000.00 SUBTOTALS $13,500.00 $1,500.00 $15,000.00

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to Orl, FL 2 2 $600.00 $80.00 $680.00 $680.00 SUBTOTALS $6,000.00 $680.00 $6,680.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 N'l Dredg Mus Model Fab $2,500/model $2,500.00 $2,500.00 SUBTOTALS $2,000.00 $2,500.00 $4,500.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $286,162.13 $42, 280.00 $53,870.48 $96,150.48 % of % of SUBTOTALS $42,280. 00 $53,870.48 $96,150.48 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $168,115.00 $214,197.61 $382,312.61 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $168,115.00 $214,197.61 $382,312.61 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $125,835.00 $160,32 7.13 $286,162.13

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE ONE a. Legal name (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida b. Requested Grant Period from : 10/1/2012 Requested Grant Period Through : 9/30/2015 c. If this is a revised budget, indicate application/grant number: Section A: Detailed Budget a. Year: 1 2 3 4 b. Budget Detail for the Period From: 10/1/2014 Through: 9/30/2015 1. Salaries and Wages Name/Title of Position No. Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Russell/PI, Dean 1 5% of $200,09 6 $10,005.00 $10,005.00 Schipper/ Co-PI 1 25% of $128, 625 $32,156.00 $32,156.00 S-Wheeler/Exh Coord 1 25% of $45, 320 $11,330.00 $11,330.00 TBD/FPCM Liaison 1 100% of $ 35,000 $15,050.00 $19, 950.00 $35,000.00 Renner/Digitization 1 6% of $46,29 7 $2,778.00 $2,778.00 TBD/Project Assistant 1 100% of $17,539 (. 50 FTE) $17,539.00 $17,539.00 TBD/Communications As 1 100% of $15,000 (.50 FTE) $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Acord/Extl Eval/Consult 1 37% of $48,000/9 Mth Fac/Summ $6,102.00 $6,102.00 Other Personnel/Temp. 1 100% of $10,8 12 & $4,072 $10,812.00 $4, 072.00 $14,884.00 Multiple Cost Share Pers 19 See Just ification $43,133.00 $43,133.00 SUBTOTALS $78,611.00 $109, 316.00 $187,927.00 2. Fringe Benefits Rate $ Salary Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 26.9 % of $83,484.00 $3,048. 00 $19,409.20 $22,457.20 30 % of $49,932.00 $5,348. 00 $9,631.60 $14,979.60 26.09 % of $54,512.00 $13,7 16.00 $508.25 $14,224.25 SUBTOTALS $22,112. 00 $29,549.10 $51,661.10 3. Consultant Fees Name or Type of Consultant No. of Days Daily Rate of Compensation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Curry/Mus/Lib Expert 7 $2,143/da y $13,500.00 $1,500. 00 $15,000.00 SUBTOTALS $13,500.00 $1,500.00 $15,000.00

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE TWO 4. Travel From/To No. Persons No. Days $ Subsistence costs $Transportation costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total IMLS-designated Mtgs 1 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Various to Orlando FL 4 2 $1,500.00 $2, 500.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 Gainesville to ATL, GA 2 5 $960.00 $1,000.00 $1,360.00 $600.00 $1,960.00 SUBTOTALS $7,360.00 $600.00 $7,960.00 5. Supplies and Materials Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 6. Services Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM – PAGE THREE 7. Student Support (for Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians program only) Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total SUBTOTALS 8. Other Costs Item Basis/Method of Cost Computation $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total Mus Steward Advisor Fees $1000 X (2) Advisors $2,000.00 $2,000.00 Keynote Speaker Fee $6,000 presentation es timate $6,000.00 $6,000.00 Speaker Honorarium 2@1250; 1@2500; 4@1000; 1@1200 $7,700.00 $2,500.00 $10,200.00 SUBTOTALS $15,700.00 $2, 500.00 $18,200.00 10. Indirect Costs Read the instructions about Indirect Cost s before completing this section. Check the appropriate box below and provide the information requested: Current indirect cost rate(s) have been negotiated with a federal agency (for item A, i ndicate the name of the agency and date of agreement expiration; complete item B). Applicant chooses a rate not to exceed 15% of direct costs (complete item B). Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency but not yet negotiated (for item A, indicate the name of the agency and date of proposal; complete item B). Item A: Name of federal agency: Department of Health and Human Services Expiration Date: 6/18/2010 Proposal Date: Item B: Rate $ Base $ Grant Funds $Cost Sharing $Total 33.60 % of $280,748.05 $46, 127.00 $48,204.34 $94,331.34 % of % of SUBTOTALS $46,127. 00 $48,204.34 $94,331.34 11. Total Project Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total PROJECT COST TOTALS (Direct and Indirect for Budget Period) $183,410.00 $191,669.39 $375,079.39 PROJECT COST TOTALS (Excluding Student Support) $183,410.00 $191,669.39 $375,079.39 9. Total Direct Costs $ Grant Funds $ Cost Sharing $ Total TOTALS (Add subtotals of items 1 8 $137,283.00 $143,46 5.05 $280,748.05

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. BUDGET FORM: Section B, Summary Budget $ IMLS $ Cost Share $ TOTAL COSTS 1. Salaries and Wages $227,799.00 $340,543.00 $568,342.00 2. Fringe Benefits $66,888.00 $92,040.00 $158,928.00 3. Consultant Fees $40,500.00 $4,500.00 $45,000.00 4. Travel $19,360.00 $1,960.00 $21,320.00 5. Supplies and Materials 6. Services 7. Student Support 8. Other Costs $19,700.00 $5,000.00 $24,700.00 TOTAL DIRECT COSTS (1-8) $374,247.00 $444,043.00 $818,290.00 9. Indirect Costs $125,747.00 $114,995.00 $240,742.00 TOTAL COSTS (Direct and Indirect) $499,994.00 $559,038.00 $1,059,032.00 Project Funding for the Entire Grant Period 1. Grant Funds Requested from IMLS $499,994.00 2. Cost Sharing: a. Applicant’s Contribution $559,038.00 b. In-Kind Contribution c. Other Federal Agencies* d. TOTAL COST SHARING $559,038.00 3. TOTAL PROJECT FUNDING (1+2d) $1,059,032.00 Percentage of total project costs requested from IMLS 47 % *If funding has been requested from another federal agency, indicate the agency’s name:

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaBudget Justification Salaries & Wages plus Fringe IMLS request ($253,719): To execute the project successfully IMLS funding for three temporary positions (Supporting Document: P) is requested during the integration phase of merger activities and Centennial events: 1) Friends of the PCM Collection Liaison (TBD) (.43 FTE: $45,150 X 3 years = $58,695) is required to develop and manage a new volunteer program thus integrating the museum’s volunteer program. 2) The Communications Assistant (TBD) (.50 FTE: $21, 120 X 3 years = $63,360) is required to support development and dissemination of project activities and engage participants/partners. The 3) Project Assistant (TBD) (.50 FTE: $24,695 X 3 years = $74,086) will assist project leaders in monitoring accessions, tracking/reporting project progress, coordinating with project participants for meetings, and supporting internal Libraries’ communication (Note: this position is not a clerical position). Funding for Libraries’ Exhibit Coordinator Lourdes Santamaria Wheeler (.25 FTE: $57,511 X 3 years = $43,133) is requested as she is integral to the online presence of collections, exhibitions and information related to the project. Fill in behind on her other duties will be performed by student volunteers, other OPS Digital Library Center (DLC) staff. Libraries’ Operation & Digital Projects Manager Randall Renner (.06 FTE years 1 and 3, .12 FTE year 2 annual salary/fringe of $60,186 = $14,444) is requested to cover costs related to supervision of DLC student workers assigned to the project, and other technical requirements of photography and digitization management. His regular duties will be performed by other DLC staff. OPS personnel – IMLS request ($40,968): Sophia Acord, external evaluator will work periodically to capture data and observations during the academic year (10%) and will be compensated during summer months (.37 FTE: summer salary/fringe X 3 = $18,782). Students performing online exhibit digitization ($12/hr X 10hrs/wk + $326 fringe for years 2 and 3 = $12,854) to ensure all materials for physical exhibits and online supplementary exhibits have been digitized and electronically preserved. To create eight physical exhibits for centennial programming, supported by K 12 curriculum materials, OPS student personnel ($10.25/hr X 17hrs/wk for years 2 and 3 = $9,332) with support from subject specialists. Salaries & Wages plus Fringe – Cost Share ($432,583): The UF Office of Research will contribute funds for the 1) Friends of the PCM Collection Liaison (TBD) position (.57 FTE: $77,805), and 2) OPS student personnel (TBD) for digitizing PCM collection items selected by subject specialists for broad public access ($12/hr X 13hrs/wk +$318 fringe X 3 years = $12,532). Additionally, these Libraries’ personnel will contribute effort: Judith Russell, dean of University Libraries and project PI (.05 FTE: $12,696 X 3 years = $38,089) will ensure project completion by leading resource allocation for integration for the PCM, and presenting centennial programming, ensuring alignment with partners and participants. Rachel Schipper, Ph.D., associate dean and project co principal investigator (.25 FTE: $40,806 X 3 years = $122,418) will ensure overall management of integration, centennial programming, co leading private (non federal) fundraising efforts, and co leading the ARL Spec Kit development with external evaluator. Exhibit Coordinator, Santamaria Wheeler will contribute effort for increased web related information management duties in year 2 (.25 FTE: $14,378). Steve Carrico, chair, acquisitions (.01 FTE: $859 X 3 years = $2,577) will supervise Gifts & Exchange unit and delivery/processing of donations. Bess de Farber, grants manager, (.02 FTE: $2,039 X 3 years = $6,117) will organize and facilitate 2 national virtual dialogs in 2014 and 2015 with museum expert team and project staff (Curry, Ostrenko and Willumson) and support development of fundraising for private (non federal) sponsors. Chelsea Dinsmore (.15 FTE: $11,064 X 3 years = $33,192) will process government document materials for inclusion in print and digital collections, provide in depth reference service and participate in developing the anticipated 2014 Canal Exhibition. Samuel Huang, associate dean of advancement (.02 FTE: $3233 X 3 years = $9,699) will lead development team in private (non federal) fundraising support. Paul Losch, subject specialist, Latin American Collection (.15 FTE: $11,340 X 3 years = $34,020) will receive items transferred, organize collections and process future accessions, plan exhibits, facilitate access to collection, and select materials for digitization. Jimmie Lundgren (.01 FTE: $892 X 3 years = $2,676), associate chair, Cataloging/ Metadata, will supervise cataloging personnel processing collection books, maps and government documents. Cathy

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement University of FloridaMartyniak (.01 FTE: $802 X 3 years = $2,406), head, preservation department will supervise processing and storage of materials. Carol McAuliffe (.01 FTE: $635 X 3 years = $1,905), maps librarian, will provide support related to exhibits and reference. Richard Phillips (.01 FTE $868 X 3 years = $2,604), chair, Latin American Collection, will facilitate the promotion of campus events that include a Latin American component with the Center for Latin American Studies. Jan Swanbeck (.01 FTE: $856 X 3 years = $2,568), chair, Government Documents will supervise faculty processing Panama related documents for collection and/or digitization. Laurie Taylor, Ph.D., digital humanities librarian (.05 FTE: $3,418 X 3 years = $10,254), will coordinate digital collection development. Lois Widmer (.02 FTE: $2,054 X 3 years = $6,162) chair, Digital Services and Shared Collections will supervise digitization and storage of materials. John Freund, conservator (.10 FTE: $7,027 X 3 years = $21,081) will inventory deliveries, ensure storage, and document condition/damage, supervise students/volunteers to correct inventory database. Winston Harris IT senior, (.01 FTE $989 X 3 years = $2,967), will design systems for inventory web applications with Chris Nicolich, IT expert (.01 FTE: $735 X 3 years = $2,205). Nina Stoyan Rosenzweig, archivist/historian (.02 FTE: $2,297, year 2), will develop health sciences exhibit. Mark Sullivan (.02 FTE: $1,811 X 3 years = $5,433), IT Senior, will provide programming and web services for digital collections. Barbara Hood, director of communications (.05 FTE year 1, $3,352 + .07 FTE years 2, 3 @ $4,692 = $12,736) will supervise communications assistant and oversee all promotion activities. Doug Smith (.02 FTE year 1, 2 @ $1,090 + .01 FTE year 3, $545 = $2,725) head, Copy Cataloging Unit will supervise/catalog Panama related collections. Michelle McClure ElNeil (.02 FTE years 1, 3 @ $876 + .01 FTE year 2, $438 = $2,190) Peter Miller (.01 FTE $514 X 3 years = $1,542), facilities manager will fabricate and deliver exhibit materials, and coordinate van use. Consultant Fees – IMLS request ($45,000): David R. Curry required consulting services ($13,500/year X 3 years = $40,500) are critical to project success, focusing on integration strategies of branding, governance; stewardship, cultivation and support of lay experts, promotion initiatives, and national dialogs on mergers. Cost Share contribution ($4,500): From the UF Office of Research ($1,500/year X 3 years = $4,500). Travel costs – IMLS request ($19,360): IMLS designated meeting travel for PI to Washington, D.C. from Gainesville, $2,000/year for 3 years ($6,000). Advisory Group meets 3 times a year, 1 face to face meeting with 4 out of state members from various locations to Orlando for 2 days in July each year, (Greene, Aims, Sutter, Brown), ($1,500/year subsistence costs + $2,500/year transportation = $12,000). AAM conference travel to Atlanta, GA from Gainesville (2 staff X 5 days, subsistence costs is $360 plus $1,000 transportation). Travel costs – Cost Share contribution ($1,960): FLA Conference travel by project staff to Orlando (year 1 and 2) (2 staff for 2 days = $600 for subsistence costs, $80 for mileage = $680 X 2 years = $1,360). AAM conference travel to Atlanta, GA from Gainesville $600 cost share for subsistence described above. Other conference attendance and travel costs will be covered by Libraries annual conference travel funding for project staff. Other Costs – IMLS request ($19,700): Museum expert advisor honoraria for Glenn Willumson, Ph.D. and Wit Ostrenko ($1,000 includes travel) X 3 years = $6,000. David McCullough, noted author has been invited to present as the centennial keynote speaker. If McCullough is unavailable, a similarly noteworthy speaker will be secured ($6,000). Centennial speakers have agreed to present for honoraria (inclusive of travel): Julie Greene, Ph.D. U. of Maryland ($1,000), Paul Sutter, Ph.D., U. of Colorado ($1,000), Aims McGuiness, Ph.D., U. of Wisconsin ($1,000), Edith Crouch, author and molas exhibit expert ($1,200), two Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam lecturers will be finalized during trip to Panama in March 2012 ($1,250/presenter). Other Costs – Cost share contribution ($5,000): Funding from the Office of Research supports Dick Kamsteeg, model fabricator, who created a Panama Canal model requiring assembly in year 2 ($2,500 including travel costs), and Ronald de Heer, guest lecturer ($2,500 including travel costs). Both from the Netherlands. Indirect Costs – IMLS Request: ($125,747) : Computed 33.6% of $374,246. Indirect Costs – Cost Share contribution: ($114,995): Computed 33.6% of ($342,247) for 3 years salaries, wages and fringe for Libraries cost share personnel described in cost share section above.

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The Panama Canal – Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Important Human Achievement University of Florida List of Key Project Staff and Consultants Acord, Sophia K. Brown, Patrice Carrico, Steve Crouch, Edith Read Barkowitz Curry, David R. de Farber, Bess de Heer, Ronald Dinsmore, Chelsea Freund, John Greene, Julie Harris, Winston Hood, Barbara Huang, Sam Jones, Douglas S. Losch, Paul Lundgren, Jimmie Martyniak, Cathy Mcauliffe, Carol McClure-ElNeil, Michelle McGuinness, Aims Miller, Peter Morgan, Paul Nicolich, Chris Ortiz, Paul Ostrenko, Wit Phillips, Richard Renner, Randall Russell, Judith Santamaria-Wheeler, Lourdes Schipper, Rachel Smith, Doug Stoyan-Rosenzweig, Nina Sullivan, Mark Sutter, Paul Swanbeck, Janet Taylor, Laurie Townsend, Frank C. Widmer, Lois Willumson, Glenn G. Wood, Joe

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Project Advisory Board Member Patrice Brown 8601 Adelphi Road College Park Md. (301) 837-0599 patrice.brown@nara.gov Education Masters of Arts American Studies, 1976 George Washington University Washington, D.C. Bachelors of Arts History, 1973 Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross Washington, D.C. Honor : Inducted into Phi Gamma Mu Association Memberships € MARAC (Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference (have served as Secretary) € Society for History in the Federal Government € National Archives Assembly (have served as Secretary; have served on the Nominations Committee; currently Archivist/Historian) Professional Experience € Senior Archivist, Subject Matter Specialist in Transportation/Panama Canal records at the National Archives (NARA). € Worked with the Panama Canal records at the National Archives since 1976. Acquired knowledge of the holdings of the records in th e National Archives in Washington, D.C. as well as Suitland and the record center around the country. Also, became familiar with the holdings of the Library of Congress concerning the Panama Canal. € Worked with the National Archives and the offi cials on the Canal Zone to transfer federal records of permanent value to the National Ar chives. This covered planning, coordinating, and completing the paperwork to transfer both the legal and physical custody of the records to the National Archives. € Described and arranged the majority of Panama Canal records in the custody of the National Archives. (Approximately 1500 cubic ft.) € Assisted researchers, records ma nagers, NARA staff, and the general public with inquiries (written, on phone, in person) dealin g with the Panama Canal/Canal Zone. € Wrote article entitled, “The Panama Canal: Th e African American Experience” that appeared in the 1997 Summer Issue of Prologue. € Made a presentation at MARAC (Mid-Atlanti c Regional Archives Conference) to fellow archivist and historians at the fall 2001 Conf erence on the transfer of permanent records from the Canal Zone to the National Archives. € Presented a paper at the National Archives to the staff and general public concerning the transfer of permanent Panama Canal records from the Canal Zone authorities to the National Archives as part of Archives Week celebration. (2000)

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€ Gave a talk to the National Archives staff and the general public concerning the AfroAmerican employees on the Canal Zone. (2006) € Gave a talk to the National Archives staff and the general public concerning transiting the Panama Canal for Maritime History Month. (2006)

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer JULIE GREENE University of Maryland W: 301-405-4267 Department of History H: 301-328-5803 2115 Francis Scott Key Hall F: 301-314-9399 College Park, MD 20742 jmg@umd.edu ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE Professor, University of Maryland, 2010Associate Professor, University of Maryland, 2007-2010 Associate Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1999-2008 Assistant Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1994-1999 Assistant Professor, University of Missouri at Kansas City, 1990-1993 Visiting Lecturer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1989–1990 HONORS Awards James A. Rawley Prize, awarde d by the Organization of Americ an Historians for the best book published on the history of race relations, 2009, for The Canal Builders: Making America’s Empire at the Panama Canal Award for Excellence in Service, Boul der Faculty Assembly, U-Colorado, 2003 Fellowships and Grants Travel Grant, U-Colorado Graduate Council, for research in London, 2006 National Endowment for the Hu manities Fellowship, 2004-2005 Travel Grant, U-Colorado Graduate Council, for research in Panam, 2002 American Council for Learned Societies Fellowship, 2000-2001 National Humanities Center Fellowship, Triang le Research Park, North Carolina, 2000-2001 (declined) National Endowment for th e Humanities Fellowship, 1993–94 Research Fellowship, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 1991–1992 Josephine De Karman Fellowship, 1988–1989 American Historical Associ ation Beveridge Grant, 1988 Yale University Fellowship, 1982 to 1986 Power Foundation Scholarship for New Hall College, Cambridge Univ., 1980-82 EDUCATION Yale University History Ph.D. 1990 History M.A., M.Phil 1986 New Hall College, History M.A. 1987 Cambridge University History B.A. 1982 University of Michigan History B.A. with honors 1980

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PUBLICATIONS Books The Canal Builders: Making America’ s Empire at the Panama Canal (Feb. 2009, The Penguin Press, History of American Life Series) Pure and Simple Politics: The Americ an Federation of Labor and Political Activism, 1881 to 1917, Cambridge University Press, 1998 Co-Editor with Eric Arnesen and Bruce Laurie, Labor Histories: Class, Politics, and the Diversity of the American Working-Class Experience University of Illinois Press, 1998 Articles and Review Essays “The Labor of Empire: Recent Scholarship on U.S. History and Imperialism,” in Labor: Studies in Working-Cl ass History of the Americas 1 (2), summer 2004, 113-29 “Spaniards on the Silver Roll: Liminality a nd Labor Troubles in the Panama Canal Zone, 1904-1914,” International Labor and Working-Class History, 66, Fall 2004, 78-98 "Negotiating the State: Frank Wals h and the Transformation of Labor's Political Culture in Progressive America," in Kevin Boyle, ed., American Labor and Politics SUNY Press, 1998 “Dinner-Pail Politics: Employers, Workers, an d Partisan Culture in the Progressive Era,” in Arnesen, Greene, and Laurie, eds., Labor Histories "The Making of Labor's Democr acy: William Jennings Bryan, the American Federation of Labor and Progressive Era Politics," Nebraska History 77 (3 and 4), Fall/Winter 1996, 149-58 “The Strike at the Ballot Box: The Am erican Federation of Labor, Local Labor Leadership, and the Entrance into National Politics, 1906 to 1912,” Labor History 32 (2), Spring 1991, 80–100

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Douglas Jones Florida Museum of Natural History P.O. Box 117800, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 352/273-1902 352/392-8783 (Fax) dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu Professional Preparation B.A. Geology (High Honors); Rutger s University, New Brunswick, NJ; 1974 M.A. Geological & Geophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 1976 Ph.D. Geological & Geophysical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 1980 Appointments: 1996-present: Director, Florida Mu seum of Natural History (FLMNH) University of Florida (UF) 1994-1996: Chair, Department of Natural Sciences, FLMNH 1989-present: Curator of Inve rtebrate Paleontology, FLMNH Affiliate Professor, Departme nts of Geology and Biology, UF 1985-1989: Associate Curator, FLMNH Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1984-1985: Associate Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1979-1984: Assistant Professor, Department of Geology, UF 1974-1979: Teaching and Research Assistant, Depa rtment of Geological & Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University Publications Five Most Closely Related To Project : M.X. Kirby, D.S. Jones, and B.J. MacFadden. 2008. Lower Miocene stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and its bearing on the Central American Peninsula. PLoS ONE 3(7): e2791. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002791. B.J. MacFadden, P. Higgins, M.T. Clements and D.S. Jones. 2004. Diets, habitat preferences, and niche differentiation of Cenozoic sirenians from Florida: Evid ence from stable isotopes. Paleobiology 30(2): 297324. D.S. Jones and W.D. Allmon. 1999. Plio cene marine temperatures on the west coast of Florida: Estimates from mollusk shell stable isotopes, pp. 243-250. In : J.H. Wrenn, J.-P. Suc and S.A.G. Leroy, eds. The Pliocene: Time of Change. American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologi sts Foundation, Dallas. D.S. Jones, L.W. Ward, P.A. Mueller, and D.A. H odell. 1998. Age of marine mollusks from the lower Miocene Pollack Farm Site, Delaware, determined by 87Sr/86Sr geochronology, pp. 21-25. In : R.N. Benson, ed. Geology and Paleontology of the Lower Miocene Pollack Farm Fossil Site, Delaware. Delaware Geological Survey, Special Publication 21, 191p. D.S. Jones. 1998. Isotopic determination of growth and longevity in fossil and modern invertebrates, pp. 3767. In : R.D. Norris and R.M. Corfield, conveners. Isotope Paleobiology and Paleoecology. The Paleontological Society Papers 4, 285p. Publications Five Other Significant Publications: D.S. Jones and S.J. Gould. 1999. Direct measurement of age in fossil Gryphaea : the solution to a classic problem in heterochrony. Paleobiology 25(2): 158-187.

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B.J. MacFadden, J. Labs-Hochstein, I. Quitmyer and D.S. Jones. 2004. Incremental growth and diagenesis of skeletal parts of the lamnoid shark Otodus obliquus from the early Eocene (Ypresian) of Morocco. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimat ology, Palaeoecology 206: 179-192. D.S. Jones, I.R. Quitmyer and C. Fred T. Andrus. 2005. Oxygen isotopic evidence for greater seasonality in Holocene shells of Donax variabilis from Florida. Palaeogeogr., Pa laeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 228: 96-108. I.R. Quitmyer, D.S. Jones and C. Fred T. Andr us. 2005. Seasonal collection of coquina clams ( Donax variabilis Say, 1822) during the Archaic a nd St. Johns Periods in coasta l northeast Florida, pp. 18-28. In : D.E. Bar-Yosef Mayer, ed. Archaeomalacology: Molluscs in Former Environments of Human Behaviour. Oxbow, Oxford, UK. K. Auffenberg, I.R. Quitmyer, J.D. Williams and D.S. Jones. 2006. Non-marine Mollusca, pp. 247-262. In : S.D. Webb, ed. First Floridians and Last Mastodons: The Page-Ladson Site on the Aucilla River. Springer, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Synergistic Activities: Natural Science Collection Alliance, Board of Directors (2003-2009), advocacy at a national level for the scientific and cultural importance of natural history collections Association of Science Museum Di rectors, Vice-President (2007-presen t), plan annual conferences and advocate for the significance of natural science collections Florida Association of Museums, Boar d of Directors Treasurer, Presiden t and Past Presid ent (2000-present), organize annual symposia regarding the importance of sc ience learning in informal settings and the roles of museums and science centers in STEM enhancement Founded Center for Informal Science Education at the Florida Museum of Natural History and appointed the first Director, Dr. Betty Dunckel Participant in UF-FLMNH initiative to internationaliz e graduate curriculum, institutionalize professional masters degree, and develop non-traditional STEM gra duate degree track emphasizing broader impacts of science on society Collaborators and Other Affiliations: Within The Last 48 Months: Fred Andrus (Alabama), Chester De Pratter (South Carolina), Linda Ivany (Syracuse), Michael Kirby (C onnecticut), Kristin Teusch (Cornell), Da vid Hurst Thomas (American Museum of Natural History), John Wehmiller (Delaw are), Bruce Wilkinson (Syracuse) Graduate Advisors: Alfred G. Fischer, Ida Thompson, and Franklyn B. Van Houten (all retired) Thesis Advisor and Postgraduate-Scholar Sponsor (Total =22 ): Nicole Cannarozzzi (Florida), Dana Ehret (Florida), Larisa DeSantis Grawe (Vande rbilt), Catalina Pimiento (Smithsonian)

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Aims McGuinness Office: Home: Dept. of History 2825 N. Farwell Ave. U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI 53211 P.O. Box 413 Tel: 414-229-4227 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413 Tel: 414-229-4227 Fax: 414-229-2435 E-mail: smia@uwm.edu Education University of Michigan Ph.D. in History 2001 Dissertation: “In the Path of Empire: Land, Labor, and Liberty in Panama during the California Gold Rush, 1848-1860” Princeton University A.B. in History June 1990 Graduated summa cum laude with a certificate in European Cultural Studies Teaching and Professional Experience Associate Professor, Dept. of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Summer 2007-present Curator, “Panamanian Passages/Pasajes Paname os.” Smithsonian Institution, October 2010-May 2011. A bilingual (English/Spanish) exhibition covering 4 million year s of the history of the Isthmus of Panama. Exhibition co-sponsored by the Smithsonian Latino Center Smithsonian Latino Center, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and the Museo del Canal Interocenico de Panam. Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Fall 2001—present Graduate Student Instructor, Dept. of History, University of Michigan Spring 2001, Fall 2000, Spring 1995, Fall 1995 Profesor Invitado, Universidad de Yucatn (Mxico) January-July 1992 and January-July 1993 Selected Fellowships, Grants, and Awards UWM Research in the Humanities Award. UWM. Fall 2009.

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Graduate School Research Committee Award. UWM. $10,600.00. Morris Fromkin Research Grant and Lectureship (with Prof. Jasmine Alinder, History). $5,000. UWM Golda Meir Library. Fall 2004. Huntington Fellowship. $6,000. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA. Spring 2003. W. M. Keck Foundation Fellowship. $4,600. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA. Spring 2003. Fulbright Scholarship for dissertation research in Panama and Colombia. 1997-1998. Phi Beta Kappa. Princeton University. 1990. Selected Publications Book McGuinness, Aims. Path of Empire: Latin American Transfor mations and the California Gold Rush, 1848-1856 Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008. Edited Book Scott, Rebecca J., Thomas C. Holt, Frederick Cooper, and Aims McGuinness, eds. Societies after Slavery: A Select Annotated Bibliography of Printed Sources on the Britis h West Indies, South Africa, British Colonial Africa, Cuba, and Brazil. Pittsburgh: University of Pitts burgh Press, 2002. Paperback edition, 2003. Articles and Book Chapters McGuinness, Aims. “Sovereignty on the Isthmus: Federalis m, U.S. Empire, and the Struggle for panama during the California Gold Rush.” In The State of Sovereignty: Territories, Laws, Populations edited by Douglas Howland and Luise White. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2009. McGuinness, Aims. “La llegada del fantasma: la reti rada de William Walker por Panam y las races del imperialismo estadounidense en Amrica Latina.” Boletn de la Asociacin para el Fomento de los Estudios Histricos en Centroamrica 36 (June 2008) [ http://afehc-historia centroamericana.org/index.php?action=fi_aff&id=1934]. McGuinness, Aims. “Aquellos tiempos de California: el Fe rrocarril de Panam y la transformacin de la zona de trnsito durante la Fiebre del Oro.” [“Those Bygone Days of California: The Panama Railroad and the Gold Rush.”] In Historia General de Panam edited by Alfredo Castillero Calvo, 141-159. Panam: Repblica de Panam, 2004.

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer PAUL W. MORG AN, JR., Ph.D. HIGHER EDUCATION: Attended Canal Zone Junior College, 1962-1963 B.A., Philosophy, Florida State University, 1966 M. Div., Theology, Vanderbilt University, 1970 M.A., Marriage, Family, & Child Co unseling, Azusa-Pacific University, 1982, with clinical internship at the California Family Study Center, Burbank, California (198182), and post-graduate supervision of c linical work at the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas (1982-83) M.A., International Affairs, Florid a State University, 1992 Ph.D., History (U.S./Latin Ameri ca), Florida State University, 2000 WORK EXPERIENCE: Civilian Teaching Experience: 2010-present Instructor, U.S. Hist ory, University of South Florida 2004-2010 Instructor in U.S. History and Undergraduate Academic Advisor, History Department, University of South Florida 2003-2004 Visiting Instructor, U.S. History, Un iversity of South Florida 1995-1997 Teaching Assistant, U.S. and Latin Am erican History (taught survey courses in U.S. and Latin American History and uppe r division course in the history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbe an), Florida State University Military Experience: 1971-1991 (to military reti rement): For twenty years, I was a U.S. Army chaplain and was assigned as a hospita l chaplain, administrative chaplain, marriage and family counseling chaplain, un it chaplain, and as an instru ctor at the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. During this period, I served in Korea, Germany, and on posts throughout the United States. TEACHING AWARDS: University Teaching Excellence Award for Outstandi ng Teaching Assistants, Florida State University, 1996 Thomas Campbell Outstanding Teaching Assistan t Award, History Department, Florida State University, 1996

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HONOR ORGANIZATIONS: Phi Theta Kappa, Canal Zone Junior College (Panama) Phi Kappa Phi, Florida State University Phi Alpha Theta, Florida State University (President, 1996-1997) SCHOLARSHIP AND PUBLICATIONS : “The Working Women of Guadalajara, 1821: Class and Gender Issues on the Eve of Independence.” Urban History Workshop Review Volume 3, Spring 1996: 17-21. “The Role of North American Women in U.S. Cu ltural Chauvinism in the Panama Canal Zone, 19041945.” Ph. D. dissertation, Florida State University, 2000. This unpublished work is cited in Julie Greene, The Canal Builders: Making America' s Empire at the Panama Canal (New York: Penguin Press, 2009) and in Alexander Missal, Seaway to the Future: American Visions and the Construction of the Panama Canal (Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2008) PRESENTATIONS: “The Women of Guadalajara, 1821,” Phi Alpha Theta Conference, University of South Florida, April 1997. VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE: Trustee, Panama Canal Museum Seminole, Florida, 2000-present

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer Paul S. Sutter 1414 Zamia Ave, Boulder, CO 80304 303-442-0996 (h); 303-492-6208 (o); 303-492-1868 (fax) Email: paul.sutter@colorado.edu EMPLOYMENT HISTORY University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Associate Professor of History, 2009-present University of Georgia Athens, Georgia Director of Graduate Studies and Instructional Coordinator, 2008-2009 Associate Professor of History, 2004-2009 Assistant Professor of History, 2000-2004 University of Virginia Charlottesville, Virginia Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Technology and the Environment, 1997-2000 EDUCATION University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas – Ph. D. w ith Honors, December 1997. Major Advisor : Donald Worster Hamilton College Clinton, New York – B.A. in American Studies, May 1987. RESEARCH-IN-PROGRESS Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon and Southern Environmental History – This book-length project examines the history of Providence Canyon, which is today a Geor gia State Park. During the 1930 s, the “canyon,” which is the m ost extreme of a series of spectacular erosio n gullies, was commonly represented as the s upreme example of southern soil abuse. Th is short, heavily-illustrated book will examine the representational history of the place and ask what lessons it might provide fo r southern conservation and environmental history. Under contract with the University of Georgia Press. “American Environmental Histor y: The State of the Field,” essay commissioned for the Journal of American History in progress. Pulling the Teeth of the Tropics: Environment, Disease, Race, and the U.S. Sanitary Program in Panama, 1904-1914 – This booklength project examines the relationships between disease, enviro nmental change, racial segregatio n, labor control, and ideas o f tropical nature as they manifest themselves duri ng the U.S. construction of the Panama Canal. SELECTED PU BLICATIONS Books € Driven Wild: How the Fight against Automobiles Launched the Modern Wilderness Movement Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002. € Environmental History and th e American South: A Reader co-edited with Christopher Manganiello. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009. € The Art of Managing Longleaf: A Personal History of the Stoddard-Neel Approach with Leon Neel and Albert G. Way. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2010. Selected Articles, Book Chapters, and Review Essays € “What Gullies Mean: Georgia’s ‘Little Grand Ca nyon’ and Southern Environmental History,” Journal of Southern History 76, 3 (August 2010): 579-616. € “Seeing Beyond Our Borders: U.S. and Non-U.S. H istoriographies,” in Douglas Sackman, editor, A Companion to American Environmental History Malden, Mass: Blackwell Publishin g, 2010: 635-652. (Th is is a revised version of an essay previously published as “What Can U.S. Environmental H istorians Learn from Non-U.S. Environmen tal Historiography?” – see below for full citation).

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€ “When Environmentalisms Collid e: Ramachandra Guha’s The Unquiet Woods and U.S. Environmental History,” Environmental History 14, 3 (July 2009): 54 3-550; originally commissioned as “When Environmentalisms Collide: The Unquiet Woods and U.S. Environmental History,” in Ramachandra Guha, The Unquiet Woods: Ecological Change and Peasant Resistance in the Himalaya Twentieth Anniversary Edition. Delhi, India: Permanent Black, 2009: 233-244. € “No More the Backward Region: Southern Environmental History Comes of Age,” in Paul Sutter and Christopher Manganiello, eds., Environmental History and the American South: A Reader (Athens: University of Geor gia Press, 2009): 1-24. € “Tropical Conquest and the Rise of the Environmental Management State: The Case of U.S. Sanitary Efforts in Panama,” in Alfred McCoy and Francisco Scarano, eds., Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State (Madison: University of Wisconsin Pr ess, 2009): 317-326. € “Knowing Nature Through Labored Breath ing: A Modern History of Allergy,” Reviews in American History 36, 1 (March 2008): 109-117 (review essay on Gregg Mitman’s Breathing Space ). € “Nature’s Agents or Agents of Empire?: Entomological Worker s and Environmental Change duri ng the Construction of the Panama Canal,” Isis 98 (December 2007): 724-754. o Winner of the 2008 Envirotech Article Prize o Winner of the 2009 Alice Hamilton Prize € “Wilderness and the American Machin e,” in George Weurthner, ed., Thrillcraft: The Environmental Consequences of Motorized Recreation Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 2007. € “Putting Wilderness in Cont ext: The Interwar Years, ” in Michael Lewis, ed., American Wilderness: A New History New York: Oxford University Press, 2007: 167-85. € “On ‘Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon,’” Gallery Essay, Environmental History 11, 4 (October 2006): 830-834 € “Control de Zancudos en Panam: Entomlogos y Cambio Ambiental durante la Construccin del Canal,” Historia Critica (JulyDecember 2005): 67-90. (translated by Claudia Leal) € “Origins of the National Wilderness Preserva tion System,” in H. Ken Cordell, John C. Bergstrom, and J. Michael Bowker, eds., The Multiple Values of Wilderness College Station, Penn.: Vent ure Publishing, 2005: 7-21. € “New Deal Conservation: A View from the Wilder ness,” in David Woolner and Henry Henderson, eds., FDR and the Environment New York: Palgrave, 2005: 87-106. € “Driven Wild: The Origins of Wilderness Ad vocacy during the Interwar Years,” in Schullery, P., and S. Stevenson, eds. People and Place: The Human Experience in Greater Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park, Wyo.: Yellowstone Center for Resources, 2005: 217-27. € “Representing th e Resource,” Environmental History 10, 1 (January 2005): 94-96. € “The Environment,” in Stephen J. Whitfield, editor, A Companion to Twentieth-Century America Malden, Mass: Blackwell, 2004: 179-97. € “What Can U.S. Environmental Historians Learn from Non-U.S. Environmental Historiography?” Environmental History 8, 1 (January 2003): 109-129. RECENT AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS 2009 Alice Hamilton Prize given by the American Society for Environmental History for the best environmental history article published outside of Environmental History during the previous year (2008). 2008 Envirotech Article Prize – Awarded to “the best article examining the relationships between technology and the environment published during the last three years (2005-08).” National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Fellowship Summer 2007. Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow Huntington Library, San Marino, CA, Summer 2006. Center for Humanities and Arts Research Fellowship – University of Georgia, 2005-2006. Parks-Heggoy Teaching Award (two-time winner) – Best graduate instructor in the History Department, as voted on by the graduate students, 2002-2003, 2006-2007. EDITORIAL AND ADVISORY POSITIONS Editor, “Environmental History and the Am erican South,” books series published by the University of Georgia Press. Member of the Editorial Board of Isis (History of Science Society), 2010-2012 Member of the Editorial Board of Environmental History (American Society for Environmental History), 2011-2015 Member of the Editorial Board, University of Georgia Press, 2008-2009 Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Wormsloe Institute for Environmental History

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Project Advisory Board Member/ Guest Lecturer TOWNSEND, Frank C. ACADEMIC RANK Professor, Emeritus (Retired 2005) Civil Engineering, University of Florida EDUCATION Ph.D. (Civil Engineering) Okla homa State University 1970 MSCE (Civil Engineering) Okla homa State University 1967 BSCE (Civil Engineering) Michigan College of Mining & Technology 1962 RELATED EXPERIENCE 1979-2005 Professor, Dept of Civil Engi neering, University of Florida 1992-1996 Summer IPA Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers 1970-1979 Supervisory Research Civil Engineer (GS-14) Waterways Experiment Station 1966-1970 Graduate Assistant, Ok lahoma State University 1962-1966 First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 8th Special Forces Ft. Gulick, CZ HONORS and AWARDS USUCGER Distinguished Educator Award, 2006 Elected ASCE Fellow, 2002 Byron Spangler Professor of Civil Engineering, 2000-2002 MTU Civil Engineering Academy, 1996 Tau Beta Pi, Outstanding Teacher, 1988-89 Registered Engineer Florida PE (No. 29091) ASTM C.A. Hogentogler Award, 1977, C.B. Dudley Award, 1988 U.S. Army Commendation Medal, 1966 Eagle Scout, BSA, 1958 Refereed Publications (Recent Past Several Years) Elton, D., Shannon, D., Luke, B., Townsend, F., and Roth, M. (2006) “Adding Excitement to Soils: A Geotechnical Student Design Competition,” International Journal of Engineering Education Vol. 22, No. 6, pp. 13251336. Anderson, J. B., and Townsend, F.C. (2005) “Calibration of Constitutive Models for Florida Sands by Drained Triaxial Tests,” ASCE GSP 139 Calibration of Constitutive Models. Townsend, F.C. (2005) “A Legacy of Mike W. O’Neill – Service,” ASCE GSP 129 Advances in Designing and Testing Deep Foundations – In memory of Michael W. O’Neill, p.209. Anderson, J.B., Townsend, F.C., and Horta, E. (2004) “A Brief Study of the Repeatability of In-Situ Tests at the Florida Department of Transportation Deep Foundations Research Site in Orlando, Florida, USA” Proceedings 2nd International Conference on Site Characteri zation, ISC-2, Porto, Portugal Ed. A. Fonseca and P. Mayne, Mill Press, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Townsend, F.C. (2004) “Geotechnical Design Considera tions for Prestressed Concrete Pile Foundations,” Proceedings The PCI Bridge Conference, Atlanta, Ga. Also presented paper.

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Townsend, F.C. (2004), “Challenges Facing Gradua te Education in Geotechnical Engineering,” ASCE G-I GeoStrata Summer Issue. Anderson, J.B., Townsend, F.C., and Grajales, B. (2002) “C ase Histories Evaluation of Laterally Loaded Piles,” Under review ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering August. Anderson J.B. and Townsend, F.C. (2002) “A Laterally Loaded Pile Database,” ASCE GSP 116 Deep Foundations 2002An International Perspective on Theory, Design, Construction, and Performance, Orlando. Anderson, J.B and Townsend, F.C. (2001) “SPT and CPT Testing for Evaluating Lateral Loading of Deep Foundations,” ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering GT Nov., pp. 920-925. Al-Yaqout, A., and Townsend, F.C. (2001) “Str ategy for Landfill Design in Arid Regions,” ASCE Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Management Vol. 5, No. 1, Jan. pp. 2-13. SERVICE Graduate Coordinator, Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering, UF, 2001-2005 Chief Advisor, Tau Beta Pi, Fl Alpha Chapter, 1982-2005 Chairman, 5th Int. Conf. on the Application of St ress-Wave Theory to Piles, Orlando, 1996. President, USUCGER, 1994-1995. Chairman, ASCE Soil Properties Committee, 1987-1989. Continuing Education Service UF-DOCE Deep Fdns, Course Di rector, Orlando, October 9, 2001. Instructor NHI 13221 GADot 4/2/01, NYDOT, September 24-28, 2001. Geotechnical Engineering, U-T ecnological de Panama, 1999. PC Geotechnical Software, PR DOT, San Juan, 1995. Geotechnical Engineering, U-T ecnological de Panama, 1995. Quality Geotechnical Lab Testing, Univ Mi ssouri Rolla '84,'86' ,88',90',92,'94,'96,98. Deep Foundations, UF DOCE, Cocoa Beach, FL 93, 95, 96, 97,98,99. Seminario Geotecnia, U-Nacional Medellin, 198 9, & U-Nacional Manizales, 1994,Colombia. Invited Speaker ASCE FL Section St Pete 2001, Key Biscayne 2002. General Reporter, X Panamerican Conf. Soil Me ch and Fdn. Engr., Guadalajara, Mexico, 1995. General Reporter, Centri fuge '94, Singapore, 1994. General Reporter, IX Pan-Am Conf. on Soil Me ch and Fdn. Engr., Vina del Mar, Chile, 1991. General Reporter, VIII Panamerican Conf. Soil M echanics and Fdn Engr, Cartegena, Colombia, 1987.

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Project Advisory Board Member Joseph J. Wood, Jr. 3002 Sawgrass Circle Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel. (850) 668-8936 Email: Pccjoebev@comcast.net Joseph “Joe” Wood was born in Panama, Republic of Pa nama in 1937. He attended US schools in the Panama Canal Zone, graduating from Balboa High School in 1955. He received an A ssociate of Arts degree from the Canal Zone Junior College in 1957, wher e he was elected president of the Freshman and Sophomore classes. He transferred to the University of Fl orida where, in 1959, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with a major in Economics. Following a year of gradua te study at UF, he joined the US Army National Guard in Gainesville and was honorably disc harged upon completion of a six-year Army Reserve commitment. In 1961, Mr. Wood was employed as a Management Intern with the Panama Canal Co mpany (later to become the Panama Canal Commission), an independent agency of the United States Government. He successively held a variety of staff and administrative positions, includi ng Chief, Administrative Services Division, Deputy Executive Secretary of the Canal Zone and Director, O ffice of Executive Administrati on, a position he occupied from 1980 until his retirement in 1993. As Director of the Office of Execu tive Administration, Mr. Wood advised a nd represented the Administrator on policy and administrative matters and served as the principal channel of comm unication between the Canal agency and the American Embassy; the U. S. Forces ; other U. S. Government agencies in Panama; Congressional delegations; the Canal’ s Board of Directors; a nd the Government of Panama. He rendered final agency decisions on all equal oppor tunity, position classification, adve rse action and employee grievance appeals; was the Designated Agency Ethics Officer, the T op Secret and Classified In formation Security Officer and was designated the primary reli ef for the Deputy Administrator. Prior to the implementation of the Panama Canal Treat ies in 1979, which disestablished the Canal Zone and granted Panama jurisdiction over all its territory, Mr. Wood was appointed as the United States representative (co-chairman, with a Panamanian co-chairman appointed by the Panamanian Govern ment) on seven bi-national Treaty Implementation Subcommittees in the following func tional areas; lands, waters and public buildings; tax matters; importations; licensing and registration; empl oyee documentation; commercial activities; and nonprofit organization activities. Following the 1989 U. S. military action in Panama, “O peration Just Cause,” Mr. Wood served as Deputy Administrator for Administration for nine months until such time as the Treaty-mandated Panamanian Administrator and American Deputy Ad ministrator could be appointed by the President of the United States. During his time in Panama, Mr. Wood served as Chairma n, Board of Trustees, Panama Canal College for nine years; President, Canal Zone Council, Boy Scouts of America; Chairman, Committee for Aid to Heart, Cancer and Handicapped Patients; Commissioner and League Presid ent, Panama Pacific Little League; and member of the board, Summit Hills Golf and Country Club. He was recipient of the Panama Ca nal Honorary Public Service Award; th e Panama Canal Master Key to the Locks Award with the designation of “Champion of the Isthmian Community;” the Panama Canal

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Distinguished Service Award; the Boy Scouts of Amer ica Buenas Obras (Good Deeds) Award; the Boy Scouts Distinguished Medal; the Panama Canal College Medal; and numerous performance awards. After his retirement and subsequent move to the United States, he help ed found the Panama Canal Museum in 1998 and became its Founding President, a position which he still occupies. Mr. Wood is an avid golfer and member of the Killearn Go lf and Country Club in Tallahassee; a member of the George A. Smathers Library Leadership Board at the Un iversity of Florida and a me mber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge 1414 in Panama. He is married to the former Beverly Bowman, who was born and raised in the Canal Zone; they have three sons, Cr aig (wife, Heather), Brian (wife Karina) and Scott; and four grandchildren, Jordan, Cameron, Adrian and Asher.

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Guest Lecturer Edith Read Barkowitz Crouch 1317 Braeburn Road Charlotte, North Carolina 28211 704-442-0593 ecrouch@carolina.rr.com Experience: Author 2007 – Present Walker & Gillette, American Architects : From Classicism through Modernism Including the Architectural Wo rk of Joseph Mordecai Hirschman to be published by Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 2013. This book will explore the full creativ e spectrum of architectural work designed and created by Walker & Gillette from the 1900s – 1950s including highlights of Hirschman’s work with the firm. The Mola: Traditional Kuna Textile Art published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., August, 2011. The mola is a multilayered textile art form and metaphor for the story of the Kuna, indigenous people of Panama. With over 890 images covering more than a century of molas, this book provides insights into design sources and influences for molas, perspectives on the aesthetic pr actices of women creating th em, and hints for collecting and preserving this colorful textile art form. The hand-appl iqud art panels tell the ta le of the Kuna women and are symbolic of their artistry, observation, and beliefs. Their lush tropical paradise cultural cosmology, sense of humor, and exposure to foreign elements are represented in these fascinating fabric designs. A brief history of Panama and its rich tradition of indige nous arts place the mola in context. Tiffany Studios’ Techniques: In spiration for Today’s Artists published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., December 2010. This book explores the creative media that ma ster designer Louis Comfor t Tiffany (1848-1933) and his Tiffany Studios in New York pioneered, coupled with rela ted masterpieces that contem porary artists have made. Nine chapters present Tiffany's original paintings and fine arts, stained glass windows and lampshades, mosaics, favrile glass objects, metalwork, enamels, and jewelry. E ach method is explained and superlative examples are shown in 560 color photographs. Related artworks, by 17 contemporary artists, establish how L.C. Tiffany has influenced living artists. All the artw orks were inspired by natural flower s and plant material in Art Nouveau aesthetics. This reference book is a t ool for designers, Tiffany collectors, and everyone who aspires to create their own masterpieces. The Mosaics of Louis Comfort Tiffany published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., December 2008. This is the first book exclusively about L. C. Tiffany's glass mosaic masterpieces, created from 1880 to 1931 at the Tiffany Studios in New York City for clients across the contin ent. The book’s text is combined with over 700 color photographs to showcase Tiffany's magni ficent art. Many of the images are published here for the first time, highlighting over 70 luminous installations in private mansions, public buildings, and churches. Beautifully decorated interiors, mausoleums, and domestic room s are shown along with an explanation of Tiffany's technique of mosaic making and the unique glass he crea ted and used in them. New information identifies the mosaic artists who worked with him. A useful glossary of mosaic and glass terms, chronology of events in L. C. Tiffany's life relating to his mosaic wo rk, and complete listing of the loca tions of his mosaic masterpieces are provided. This book will enthrall lovers of mosaics, student s, and scholars with an inte rest in Tiffany as well as decorative arts and design. Teacher & Glass Artist 1995 Present

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Instructed adults, teachers and school aged students in the techniques of st ained, leaded, fused and mosaic glass production through the Charlotte Meck lenburg County school system, th e Mint Museums and the McColl Center for Visual Art. Developed co mplete curricula for a range of gla ss classes and designed and implemented the establishment of a complete staine d and leaded glass teaching studio. Designed and created custom stained a nd leaded glass windows, doors, lamps, lighting fixtures, and gift items for client’s residences and businesses. Communications Manager, Tampa Electric Company, 1982 – 1997 Managed the Creative Services section of the Cor porate Communications Depa rtment including human resources management and project planning and administration for the phot ography, video, web design, typesetting and graphic design areas. Perf ormed creative design and direction to staff in the production of print publications and video productions. Event planner and organizer for corporate and community functions. Degree: Bachelors of Science, School of Visu al Arts, Florida State University. Personal Note: I spent my childhood in the Panama Canal Zone from shortly after my birth through high school. While attending college in Florida, I traveled frequently to Winter Park's Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art where I became enthralled with the works of Louis Co mfort Tiffany and his talented artisans; the inspiration for my first two books came from this experience. I retu rned to my background in Panama to write about the textile art of the indigenous Kuna; my parent’s love of Panama’s culture and mola collection served as inspiration for the book on molas. The architecture book, currently in progress, was inspired by the design work of my great uncle J.M. Hirschman for Walker & Gillette.

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Museum Experts Team Member David R. Curry David R. Curry is Managing Principal of davidrcurryAssociat es, an intellectual services firm with competencies in nonprofit governance and leadership; knowledge/heritage stewardship and supporting digital strategies; market positioning, brand engineering and reputation management; and policy development and issues management, among other specialties. Prior to forming davidrcurryAsso ciates, David served as Vice President, Corp orate Public Affairs for Unisys Corporation, the global, $6 billion information technology services firm. He was a member of the senior management team for over two decades, during which he led the company’s public affairs fu nction. In this role he led issues management activities; corporate brand, market positioning and identity progra ms; executive, customer, and employee communications; the company's network of corporate and research libraries a nd historical archives; civic development and community relations; philanthropic and sponsorship programs; sale s and marketing development programs, and a range of special corporate initiatives. He directly supported specia l requirements for the Office of The Chairman during four successive Unisys CEOs from 1983 to 2002. In the museums/archives space, David’s work has ranged wide ly. He currently serves on the Advisory Council for Center for the Future of Museums (American Asso ciation of Museums). He recently comple ted nine years of service as a trustee of The Franklin Institute Science Museum (Philadelphia). He led the team in creating the Burroughs Corporation Histor ical Archives in preparation for the company’s centennial celebration in 1984, which he led as organizing chair. This collection of documents, glass slides, photographic and film materials, 3D objects and technology artifacts was eventually donated to the Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing at the University of Minnesota in the 1990s. In 1997, David was recognized by the Board of the Babbage Institute for his “extraordinary contributions” in crea ting one of premier archival resources on the history of the computing industry. David worked with the Smithsonian during the 1990s on two ma jor exhibitions relating to co mputing. The fi rst was with the National Museum of American History’s “Information Age” exhibit which spanned the development and societal impact of computing and communications fr om the 1850s forward. He provided st rategy and conceptu al counsel to the project, and facilitated archival research and other support. He also worked with the Air & Space Museum on its major “Computing in Flight” exhibit and subsequent exhibits that have explored the role of computing technology in flight and in space exploration. He continues active relationships with cu rrent Smithsonian staff on various digitization initiatives. David led formation of and helped manage the collaborati on among Unisys, the University of Pennsylvania and the Greater Philadelphia First Foundation as the organizing institutio ns for the 50th anniversary of ENIAC in 1997. This effort involved a number of regional and national organizations from the civic, academic an d commercial spheres, and culminated with Vice President Al Gore dedicating a permanent exhibit on Penn’s campus. David was a co-leader of the organizing committee and provided leadership to collab oration efforts involving the Smithsonian and many other institutions which touched th e development of the ENIAC and early computin g history. He also provided conceptual counsel on the design of the permanent exhibit. His work with science museums has spanne d the last twenty years, anchored in his work with the Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia. He guided the formatio n of the Corporate Partner program at the Franklin, and facilitated Unisys Corporation’s role as the first partner in the program. He has provided conceptual counsel to a number of exhibit projects during this period. He was instrumental in forging collaboration among twelve science museums in the U.S. and internationally to create the Science Learning Network, an NSF-funded project which explored the meeting point between museum expertise in davidrcurry Associates intellectual precision … supple imagination

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conceiving and building interactive exhibits and the emerging interactive space on the web. The principal science museums or museum organizations in the U.S. included th e Exploratorium/San Francisco, Miami, Boston, Oregon, and Minneapolis. Internationally, the collaborators included Si ngapore, Japan, London, Helsinki, Paris, Mexico, Venezuela and others. The project was honored by UNESCO which awarde d its Diderot Prize to the Science Learning Network for outstanding contributions to the public understanding of science. His work on special historical celebrations included the Burroughs Centennial and ENIAC 50th as above, as well as the 25th anniversary of the Arts Foundation of Michigan, the 50th anniversary of the Friends of the Detroit Public Library, and the 150th anniversary of the Germantown Cricket Club. He conducted archival research, provided strategy and conceptual counsel, planning, program desi gn and execution for these celebrations. David is also a co-founder and Executive Director of the Cent er for Vaccine Ethics and Policy (CVEP), a joint program of the Penn Center for Bioethics, The Wistar Institute Vaccine Center, and the Vaccine Education Center of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. CVEP focuses on ethical and policy issues associated with the full vaccine life cycle from basic discovery and bench science to clinical trials to manufacturin g and market deployment to global public health strategies and immunization campaigns. He became an Associate Fellow of the Center for Bioethics in 2010 and prior to that appointment was a Visiting Scholar at the Penn Center for Bioethics from 2005. David enjoys a strong record of leadership and governance service with nonprofit organizations in the sciences, arts and education sectors. As noted above, he currently serves on the Advisory Council for Center for the Future of Museums (American Association of Museums), and recently completed nine years of service as a trustee of The Franklin Institute Science Museum (Philadelphia). He also serves on the board of the International Literacy Institute/National Center for Adult Literacy of the University of Pennsylvania, and on the Executive Committee of the Hilton Humanitarian Prize Collaborative. He has served on the board of the Philadelphia Committee on City Policy, and as a member of the Executive Committee of The Philadelphia Liberty Medal. Earlier, David served on the board of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the board of Arts Midwest, the seven-state, region al arts service organization involved in a range of arts programming and granting management of National Endowmen t for the Arts and other funds. David served as president of the board of The Arts Foundation of Michigan, as vice president of the board of the Friends of Detroit Public Library, and as chairman of the Michigan Ce nter for the Book (Library of Congress), among others. He is President Emeritus and served on the Board of Governors of the Germantown Cricket Cl ub (Philadelphia, 1854), one of the oldest and most diverse private at hletic and social clubs in the nation. He has been honored by a range of organizations for his governance and leadership service. David earned a B.A. in Philosophy with High Distinction and Phi Beta Kappa from the Honors Program at Wayne University in Detroit, Michigan. He also holds an MS in Information and Library Scienc e from Wayne. He earned a Scientific Honors diploma from the Univ ersity of Detroit Jesuit High School. *

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Museum Experts Team Member Witold (Wit) Ostrenko (813) 987-6300Museum (813) 841-3270Cell Tampa, Florida 33617 wostrenko@mosi.org Professional Preparation Bachelor of Science, Zoology, Flor ida Atlantic University, December 1969 Master of Science, Aquatic Ecology, University of Miami, May 1978 Doctorate of Philosophy, Oceanography, Nova University, a.b.d. Training in Russian/English scientific translation Professional Associations : Most Recently. President of the international Association of Science and Technology Centers. Washington, D.C. Serving/representing the science center and museum field world wide. Founding Board President of the Florida Association of Museums. Founding Member of FAST (Florida Association of Science & Technology). 1987 to Present Museum of Science & Industry, Tampa, Florida President and CEO of MO SI Science Center, Inc. 1990-present. Responsible for board development, fund raising, longrange and strategic planning. Accumulated and developed $110 million asset including 75-acre site, 318,000 square feet of fac ilities including a) Science Center; b) Whitney An drews Lang Center for Learning; c) IMAX Dome Theatre; d) Children’s Science Center Kids In Charge!; e) Science Library; f) Preschool and Middle-Grade School 560 students; g):The Saunders Planetarium; h) Laboratories, Weather Simulators, and Classrooms. Leads Nature Tours by land, sea, and air. Currently completing $34 million expansion. Completed Kids in Charge!, a 40,000-sq.-ft. children’s science center; Disasterville, a 10,000-sq.-ft. natural hazar ds of the U.S. permanent exhibition; and the Welcome Center bu ilding. In 2010 op ened a 13,000-sq.-ft. health and the human body exhibition, The Amazing You A total of 318,000 in A/C, 436,576 under roof on 74 acres. Completed 15-year Master Plan for 2021. New Energy Center to distribute information world wide on how to utilize alternative and sustainable energy opening 20112015. July 1995 completed Phase 1 of a 15-year master plan. Expansion (200,000 sq. ft) designed by Antoine Predock triples original size to 265,000 square f eet located on 65 acres. The $36 million expansion includes an IMAX Dome Theatre and Living System for water treatment. It contains the nation's first pub lic library, Head Start School, and elementary school-science ce nteruniversity relationship. Has staff of 103, budget of $8.5 million, 600,000 visitors, and 10,000 member households. Director of Museums for Hillsborough County 1987-1995. Responsible for developing the original site into a state-of-theart science center on 47 acres. The 65,000-square-foot facility had a staff of 33, a $3 milli on revenue, 375,000 visitors, and 3,500 members. 1979 to 1987 Historical Museum of Southern Florida, Inc., Miami, Florida Assistant Director/Marketi ng Director 1982-1987 of new 35,000-square-foot history museum in a downtown cultural facility designed by Philip Johnson, which contained both a Fine Arts Cent er and Public Library. Full responsibility for attendance, pu blic relations, membership, and fund-raising efforts (corporations, individuals, deferred giving). Assisted with board development. Active in Chamber of Commerce Corporate Responsibility committee. Education Director 1979-1982. Responsible for fund raising and fiscal planning for education department. Initiated and developed history museum education program including commun ity tours, enrichment classes, outreach activities, museum demonstrations, and volunteer activities. Designed educational components for new facility exhibitions. Developed history curriculum for all educational programs including school progra ms, public demonstrations, and human interpretation of archaeolo gical and historic sites. Led seven-day historic/ecological Everglades tours and ten-day historic/ecological Florida Keys tours for Smithsonian Field Series. 1976 to 1979 Museum of Science, Miami, Florida Director of Education Developed and directed science education programs including hiring and supervision of six fulltime and 47 part-time staff and instructors. Trained and supervised 100 plus volunteer docents. Was responsible for fiscal pl anning of budget and fund raising for program activities. Specia lized in Children’s Outdoor natural history activities.

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1974 to 1976 Graduate Student, Unive rsity of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida Instructor of laboratory classes, including lectures, demonstrations, tutoring, and testing in General Biology and Genetics. Research in aquatic ecology and small mammal population studies. Familiar with ecological methods, anatomy, and physiology. 1970 to 1974 United States Coast Guard Honors Florida Association of Museums Lifetime Achievement Award Innovator Award Hispanic Heritage – Amigo Award; friend of the Hispanic community Selected Presentations Annual presentations at ASTC, AAM, FAM and other regional and local venues on Leadership, Education, Science and Creativity. Private Consulting on Planning, Design and Group Dynamic Facilitation. Selected Publications Ostrenko, W. and F. Steier; Conversations as a Core Process; Creating a Culture of Di alogue in Juanita Brown and David Issac in The World Caf; Shaping our futures through conversatio ns that matter, Shaffer, Berrett; Kohler 2005 Steier, F. and Ostrenko, W. “Taking Cybernetics Seriously at a Science Center: Reflection-in-interaction and Second Order Organizational Learning. Cybernetics and Human Knowing, 2000, Vol. 7, 2-3, pp. 47-69. Ostrenko, W. and Atherholt, W. “e-Commerce in Science Museums,” published ASTC 2000 Ostrenko, W. and Zajonc, M. "Banya n Trees to Cultural Cornerstones," Southeastern Museum Conference Journal Published 1984 by Southeastern Museum Confer ence, Memphis, Tennessee. Ostrenko W., Rothstein, B. and Mazzotti, F.J. "Population Dy namics and Utilization of the Exo tic Melaleuca quinquenervia by T hree Sympatric Rodents. Abstract. Florida Academy of Science, 1979 Annual Meeting. Ostrenko, W. and Mazzotti, F.J. "The Role of Science Museum s in Environmental Education Bringing the Public and the Environment Together." Abstract. Florida Academy of Science, 1977 Annual Meeting. Synergistic Activities Smithsonian Associate Field Trip L eader – Everglades and Big Cypress Association of Science Technology Centers Conference – Problem Solving Techniques, 2001 Advisory Board, Cultural Institutions Management Program, 2001 to present Advisory Board, American Association of Museums, Museums & Community, 2000-2001 Association of Science Technology Centers Conference – Contemporary Exhibit Design, 2000 Collaborators and Other Affiliations Collaborators Dr. Fred Steier, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida Dr. Judith Lombana, Hillsborough County School System, Tampa, Florida Dr. Anita Goel, Nanobiosym, Boston, Mass. Dr. Frank Mazzotti, Urban Wildlife Specialist, Ft. Lauderdale. FL

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Museum Experts Team Member GLENN G. WILLUMSON 9821 SW 55th Road University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32608 School of Art and Art History 352-273-3072 P.O. Box 115801 gwillumson@arts.ufl.edu Gainesville, FL 32611-5801 352-392-0201, ext. 234 Employment Education Doctor of Philosophy in Art History, Univer sity of California, Santa Barbara. 1988. Master of Arts in Art History, Un iversity of California, Davis. 1984. Bachelor of Arts in English, cum laude St. Mary's College, Moraga, California. 1971. Selected Publications Iron Muse: Picturing the Transcontinental Railroad Berkeley: University of California Press. Accepted, publication 2013. “Grand Schemes and Big Things: E. B. Cr ocker and the Transc ontinental Railroad Legacy,” in The Crocker Art Museum Collection Unveiled ed. Scott Shields (Sacramento: Crocker Art Museum, 2010), 11-21. “’Photographing under Difficulties:’ Andrew J. Russell’s Photography for the King Survey,” in Framing the West (New Haven: Yale Univ ersity Press, 2010), 175-86. “The Emerging Role of the Educator in the Art Museum,” a chapter in From Periphery to Center: Art Museum Education in the 21st Century edited by Patricia Villeneuve. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association, 2007. “History Museums and Indicators to Assess th eir Impact on Quality of Life in their Communities,” an essay in Contribution of Historic Preservation to th e Quality of Life in Florida: Technical Report Tallahassee: Florida Department of Stat e, 2006, section V, unpaginated (32 pages). “Making Meaning: Photographic Materiality in the Library and the Art Museum,” a chapter in Photographs, Objects, Histories edited by Elizabeth Edwards. London: Routledge Press, 2004, pp. 62-80. 2001Professor of Art History and Di rector of Graduate Program in Museum Studies, University of Florida 1992-2001 Curator, Palmer Museum of Art, The Pennsylvania State University 1990 Visiting Professor, Department of Art History, University of California, Irvine 1988-1992 Curator for the History of Phot ography and American Art, J. Paul Getty Research Center 1987 National Writing Project Fellow 1971-1981 Teacher, California Secondary Schools Lifetime Teaching Creden tial, State of California (1976)

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W. Eugene Smith and the Photographic Essay NY: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Awarded a J. Paul Getty Publication Grant. "Alfred Hart: Photographer of th e Transcontinental Railroad." History of Photography XII/1 (January-March 1988), pp. 61-75. Selected Academic Awards and Honors Bill Lane Fellow, Stanford University, Fall 2008. Senior Research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum of American Art, 2007-2008. Beinecke Fellow, Yale University, 2007. Florida State Grant, Depart ment of State, 2005-06. Part of an intercollegiate team that included the Colleges of Law, Recreation and Tourism, Architecture and Historic Preservation. National Endowment for the Humaniti es Summer Institute Fellow, 2005. National Endowment for the Humanities, Fe llowships for University Teachers, 1998. Selected Lectures “Competition and Collaboration: Early Photography of the American West,” Smithsonian American Art Museum, April 9, 2010. “The Redemptive Space of the First Transc ontinental Railroad,” A nnual Conference of The Western History Asso ciation, October 9, 2009. “Soft Power: The Photographic Archive and the Central Pacific Railroad,” Business History Annual Conference, April 10-13, 2008. “Assessing Your Museum’s Impact on the Comm unity,” chaired session at the American Association of Museums Conference, May 13-17, 2007. Keynote address at “Gallery Praxis,” a coll aborative conference associated with the National Art Education Association and the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, January 11-13, 2007. Selected Curatorial Projects Historic Moments in St. Augus tine’s History, Government Hous e, St. Augustine, Florida, 2009. (Co-curated with seminar students) Curator, History Past, History Present: Th e Daguerreotype Portrait in America January 2001. Palmer Museum of Art. Curator, “ The Crossing ”: A Video Installation by Bill Viola September 1999. Palmer Museum of Art. Co-Curator, Dismal Science: Photo-Wo rks by Allan Sekula, 1972-1996 January 1997. Palmer Museum of Art.

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Museum Experts Team Member SOPHIA KRZYS ACORD, PH.D. Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere University of Florida (UF) 200 Walker Hall P.O. Box 118030 Gainesville, FL 32611 USA skacord@ufl.edu FACULTY POSITION 2010Associate Director, Center for the Huma nities and the Public Sphere, UF present Program development and evaluation 2011Lecturer, Department of Sociol ogy and Criminology, & Law, UF present Instruction in: qualitative research met hods, technology studies, cultural sociology 2007Research Scientist, Center for Studies in High er Education, University of California, Berkeley 2010 Project Manager, the Future of Scholarly Communication and Meaning and Locus of Peer Review for Publication both funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation EDUCATION 2009 Ph.D., Sociology, University of Exeter, UK *Awarded an Honorable Mention by the 2010 ASA Dissertation Award committee. 2005 M.Res. (Masters of Research Methodology), Sociology, University of Exeter, UK Graduated summa cum laude 2003 B.A., Sociology & Anthropology (Minor, Interpretation Theory), Swarthmore College, PA Graduated with High Honors, Phi Beta Kappa OTHER RESEARCH AND EVALUATION EXPERIENCE 2003Research Associate Center for Mobile Communication Studies Rutgers University 2007 Designed, conducted, and published research on digital technologies and information-seeking. 2005 Research Assistant School of Education and Lifelong Learning University of Exeter Provided research support to Professor Gert Biesta on evidence-based practice in education. 2003Research Consultant and Evaluator Department of Drama University of Exeter 2004 Action research of On the Edge, an applied drama about first-episode psychosis. On the Edge won the UK Department of Health’s 2005 Health and Social Care Awards in the Southern region. 2000Intern La Dlgation aux Arts Plastiques Le Ministre de la Culture, Paris, France 2001 Created a national database of museum frequentation and education programs. 2001Assistant to Outreach Coordinator and Evaluator InterAct Theatre Company Philadelphia, PA 2002 Prepared, instructed, and evaluated NEA-funded theatrical residencies focusing on conflict resolution in juvenile detention centers. 2000 Ba rrymore Recipient for Best Education Department. 1992Archival Assistant Special Collections Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 1998 Assisted in processing book, manuscript, and photographic collections, cataloguing new books. SELECTED PEER-REVIEWED PU BLICATIONS AND WHITE PAPERS Acord, S.K. and Harley, D. (forthcoming) “Credit, tim e, and personality? Incorporating disciplinary needs and values into predictions about the future of scholarly communication.” New Media & Society.

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Acord, S.K. (conditionally accepted). Installing contempor ary art: Curatorial power an d agency in configuring museum publics. Cultural Sociology. Harley, D. and Acord, S.K. (2011, March). Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future. Berkeley, CA: Center for Studies in Higher Education. Harley, D. & Acord, S.K. (2010). Studying the impacts of embedded disciplinary cultures in a networked Academy White paper for the NSF, SBE 2020: Future Research in the Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences. Harley, D., Acord, S.K., Earl-Novell, S., Lawrence, S. & King, C.J. (2010) Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication Berkeley, CA: Center for Stud ies in Higher Education. Acord, S.K. & DeNora, T. (2008). Culture and the arts: From art worlds to arts-in-action. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 619(1), 223-237. Acord, S.K. (2006). Beyond the code: New aesthetic methodologies for the sociology of the arts. Sociologie de l’Art OPUS 9-10, 69-86. Acord, S.K. (2006). The museum as university: Looking out–looking in. Protocols: History and Theory 2. SELECTED INVITED PRESENTATIONS Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), 1-2 December 2011. “Isn’t that a Tool? Interpreting and Championing Digital Scholarly Communication in the Humanities” “Understanding Digital Natives” web seminar, 4 May 2010. Presented by the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) in collaboration with the Associ ation for American Univer sity Presses (AAUP). Evaluation Practices in Art Worlds, Social Science Research Center Berlin, 27-28 November 2009. A peer-reviewed workshop organized by the research unit on Cultural Sources of Newness: “Does ‘it work’? A microethnographic study of the installation of contemporary art.” American Sociological Association, NYC, 2007. Cultu re network roundtable pres entation: “Installing contemporary art: Configuring the next generation of museum visitors.” International Sociological Association World Congress, Durban, 2006. RC37 Sociology of the Arts: “The curator as sociologist: Bridging the gap between so ciology and the exhibition of contemporary art.” European Sociological Association, Toru 2005. Collective Memory: “Cultural strategies of classification: Artistic controversy and the public shaping of cultural heritage.” SELECTED SERVICE At UF: Creative Campus Committee, Committee for Ci vic Engagement, University Library Committee, Faculty Senate, Data Lifecycle Committee, Qualitative Research Board, Social Entrepreneurship Board Founding Editor: Music and Arts in Action (MAiA) Referee: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Museum Anthropology, Sociological Theory, Theory and Society

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Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Paul Andrew Ortiz Director Associate Professor Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Department of History 245 Pugh Hall 210 Keene-Flint Hall P.O. Box 115215 P.O. Box 117320 University of Florida University of Florida Gainesville, Florida, 32611 Gainesville, Florida, 32611 352-392-7168 (352) 392-6927 (Fax) http://www.history.ufl.edu/oral/ portiz@ufl.edu EDUCATION Ph.D., Department of Histor y, Duke University, May 2000. B.A., The Evergreen State College, 1990 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Director, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, University of Florida, 2008-Present. Associate Professor, Department of Hist ory, University of Florida, 2008-Present. Associate Professor, Department of Community St udies, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2005-2011. Assistant Professor, Department of Community Studies, UC-Santa Cruz, 2001-2005. Visiting Assistant Professor of History and Documentary Studies, Duke University, 2000-2001. PUBLICATIONS: BOOKS Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Bla ck Organizing and White Violen ce in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920 American Crossroads Series, George Gund Foundation imprint in African American Studies (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995) William Chafe, Raymond Gavins, Robert Ko rstad, and Paul Ortiz, et. al., (eds.) Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Talk About Life in the Segregated South (New York, The New Press, 2001; 2008). PUBLICATIONS: SELECTED ESSAYS Essay, “Black History’s Revolutionary Tradi tion, C.L.R. James’s Visionary Legacy,” Against the Current (January/February 2012) http://www.solidar ity-us.org/node/3494 Essay, “Stetson Kennedy and the Pursuit of Truth,” Facing South Blog, August 30, 2012. Republished in The Florida Historical Quarterly (Fall, 2011); The Oral History Review (Forthcoming), & Vital Speeches (forthcoming). http://www.southernstudies.org/2011/08/voices -stetson-kennedy-and-the-pursuit-of-truth.html Guest Editorial, “In Support of Our St udents, In Support of the DREAM Act,” Latino Studies (2010) 8, 438441. Chapter, “¡ Si, Se Puede Revisited: Latina/o Wor kers in the United States ,” in Social Work Practice with Latinos Eds., Richard Furman & Nalini Negi (Lyceum Books, 2010).

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Essay, “Arizona’s New Laws: An Attempt to Secure Cheap Labor?” Truthout June 2, 2010, http://archive.truthout.org/arizonasnew-laws-a-pathway-cheap-labor60041 Chapter, (Afterward), “Revising Florida, Revising Civil Ri ghts History,” in Old South, New South, or Down South? Florida and the Contemporary Civil Rights Movement Ed., Irvin D. S. Winsboro (West Virginia University Press, 2009). Chapter, “The New Battle for New Orleans,” in Hu rricane Katrina: Response and Responsibilities. 2nd edition. Edited by John Brown Childs (Berkele y: North Atlantic Books, 2008) Essay, “On the Shoulders of Giants: Senator Ob ama and the Future of American Politics,” Truthout November 25, 2008, http://archive.truthout.org/112508R Essay, “Remembering Racial Terror: The Behind the Veil Project, ” “ Radical History Review, vol. 97, Special Issue: Truth Commissions : State Terror, History, and Memory (Winter 2007) Chapter, “Farm Worker Organizing in America: From Slavery to Csar Chvez and Beyond,” in The Human Cost of Food: Farmworker Lives, Labor, and Advocacy edited by Charles D. Thompson and Melinda Wiggins (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002). BOOKS IN PROGRESS: Behind the Veil: African Americans in the Age of Se gregation, 1895-1965 with William H. Chafe, Thavolia Glymph, Raymond Gavins and Robert Korstad (Manuscript in Progress) Our Separate Struggles Are Really One: African American and Latina/o Hi stories (Boston: Beacon Press, manuscript under contract ) SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORS: Presented with The Key to the City of Ocoee, Florida by Mayor S. Scott Vandergrift, January 18, 2010. (For delivering MLK Keynote Address.) Harry T. and Harriett V. Moore Book Prize, 2006, Florida Historical Society and the Florida Institute of Technology for Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920 Lillian Smith Book Award, 2002, Southern Regional Council for Remembering Jim Crow : African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South (With William H. Chafe, et. al.) Carey McWilliams Book Award The MultiCultural Review (outstanding work related to the U.S. experience of cultural diversity) for Remembering Jim Crow (2002). Project Award for Outstanding Use of Oral History, 1996, Oral History Association, for “Behind the Veil” project. Key Libraries Staff

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Judith C. Russell Home: Office: 516 NE 4th Street P.O. Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32601 Gainesville FL 32611-7001 (202) 262-6501 (352) 273-2505 russell@erols.com jcrussell@ufl.edu Recent Experience: 2007 to Present University of Florida Dean of University Libraries • Leads the George A. Smathers Libraries, the larg est information resource system in the state of Florida, with a permanent staff of 225 and a budget of $27 million • Responsible for research services and scholar ly resources to support the diverse academic and research interests of the Un iversity’s students and faculty 2003 to 2007 U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) Superintendent of Documents (Managi ng Director, Information Dissemination) • Leads the agency in providing public access to information published by the U.S. government and establishing the policy guidance and strategy for its information dissemination programs with a combined staff of 220 and income of $70 million • Responsible for GPO’s Library Services and Content Management business unit that includes the Federal Depository Library Program, the Cataloging and Indexing Program, the International Exchange Service and GPO Access, the agency’s online public access databases • Responsible for GPO’s Publication and Info rmation Sales business unit that sells U.S. government publications and provides reimbursa ble distribution services to Federal agencies • Serves as the primary spokesperson and advocate for GPO’s information dissemination programs • Collaborates and negotiates with other Federa l agencies to ensure no-fee permanent public access to published Federal information thr ough GPO information dissemination programs • Consults with the professional and scholarly library and information science communities on the future roles of libraries, educational requirements for the next generation of information professionals and essential retraining for existing professionals 1998 to 2003 U.S. National Commission on Libraries & Information Science (NCLIS) Deputy Director • With Commissioners and Executive Director, responsible for development and implementation of NCLIS policy and communication of policy recommendations to the Administration, the Congress and other interested individuals and organizations • Responsible for NCLIS administration, in cluding financial management, appropriations, contracts and purchasing, personnel, publications management, and information technology • Organized hearings on Kids and the Internet, Library and Information Services for Individuals with Disabilities, School Librarians: Knowledge Navigators Through Troubled Times, and the proposed closing of the National Te chnical Information Service (NTIS) • Produced A Comprehensive Assessment of P ublic Information Dissemination ; Trust and Terror: New Demands for Crisis Information Dissemination and Management and Public Sector/Private Sector Interaction in Providing Information Services 1996 to 1998 IDD Enterprises, L.P.

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Director, Government Services Di vision, IDD-Digital Alliances • Responsible for introducing IDD products and services into the Federal, state and local government markets, including management of the sales and sales support staff • Responsible for IDD responses to Requests for Proposals (RFP) • Provided business analysis and specification of requirements (proposals) for IDD custom webs sites such as Smith Barney Access and Liberty Leaps 1991 to 1996 U.S. Government Printing Office Director, Office of Electronic Inform ation Dissemination Services (EIDS) • Responsible for GPO Access Online information services, including implementation of the Superintendent of Documents' World Wide Web site • Responsible for the design, marketing, docum entation, user support and training for all GPO electronic products • Managed the sale of electronic information, including over 75 CD-ROM titles and a wide variety of other Federal information in various formats Director, Library Programs Service • Responsible for the Federal Depository Librar y Program, the International Exchange Service, and the Cataloging and Indexing Program (Monthly Catalog of US Government Publications) • Performed as a dual assignment for 16 mont hs while also serving as Director, EIDS Director, Information Dissemination Policy • Responsible to the Public Printer for development and implementation of internal and external information policy objectives 1988 to 1991 Mead Data Central [Lexis-Nexis] Government Market Manager • Responsible for coordination of activities to advance the development of federal, state and local government markets for the LEXIS/NEXIS services, including coordination of sales and promotional activities, development of federal state-wide and group contracts, submission and negotiation of annual FEDLINK contract, and development of custom pricing proposals for other customer groups 1986 to 1988 & Russell Associates 1982 to 1983 Management Consultant • Provided strategic planning, acquisition/ competition analysis, product design and enhancement, and marketing services to info rmation companies, trade associations, government agencies and libraries Current Advisory and Editorial Boards: • Present-elect of the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) • Association of Research Libr aries (ARL) Board of Directors • National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) Board of Direct ors, 2005-present, (2010-2011 President) [http://www.nfais.org] • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Information and Library Science Board of Visitors, 2006 [http://sils.unc.edu/] Special Awards: • Special Libraries Association’s Profes sional Award (2005) “For outstanding cont ributions to the global community of information professionals…” • Federal Computer Week's Federal 100: The Readers' Choi ce Awards (1993) "In recognition of those individuals who have made a difference over the past year in t he federal information technology community... Education: • Master of Science in Library Science, The Ca tholic University of America, Washington, DC • Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross, Washington, DC Key Libraries Staff

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Rachel A. Schipper, Ph.D., University Librarian University of Florida, Associate Dean/Technology & Support Services, University Libraries, 2009-Present Division of 110 staff and faculty within 7 units: acquisitions; cataloging and me tadata; interlibrary loan, electronic reserves, circulation policy and copyright services; digital services and shared co llections; information technology; and, facilities (12 buildings). Coordinates representation for th e Mellon-funded Open Library Environment (OLE) project. Board member of the Northeast Florida Library Information Network, the Panama Canal Museum, and member of the Panama Canal Society. Georgia College & State University, Dean, Libr ary & Instructional Technology Center, 2004-2009 Responsible for construction and renovat ion of the 150,000 square foot facili ty housing collections, instructional technology, and the museum. Prominent archival collections Flannery O’Connor manuscripts and the papers of Senator Paul Coverdell. Coordination includes BlackBoard/WebCT and online instruction, Media Production Resources (UTV and AV), the iPod Initiative, and the Instructional Technology Center (11 comput er labs). Chair, Conflict Re solution Committee, and served on the Chancellor’s Committee for Altern ative Dispute Resolution, Regents Acad emic Committee on Libraries (RACL), and Chair, e-collection development (RACL). Shepherd University, De an, Library and Information Sciences, 2000-2004 Oversight for construction and renovation of the 95,000 square foot facility housing the senatorial collection of Robert C. Byrd, the Scarborough Library, the galleries, and audio visu al services. Developed the Scarborough Society—the Friends of the Library--and chaired the Strategic Technology Pl anning Committee. Chair of the Institutional Management Committee, successfully submitti ng both a Title III Planning Grant and a Title III grant. Florida Institute of Techno logy, Assistant Director, Information Services, 1993-2000 Management of web enhancement, techno logy, fundraising, media and technical services, and facilities. Co-founder of the Friends of the Evans Library providing the funding to reno vate the public gallery spaces with design assistance from the National Gallery of Art. Co-founder of the Enhancin g Teaching Excellence Committee, served on the Center for Distance Learning Advisory Board, and the Central Florida Library Cooperative Board of Trustees. The University of Maryland, McKeldin Library, Catalog Librarian, 1991-1992 Johns Hopkins University, Eisenhower Library, Circulation/Reserves, 1990-1991 The Pennsylvania State Universi ty, Pattee Libraries, Hispanic Bibliographic Specialist, 1987-1990 Ed.S. and Ph.D. The Florida Instit ute of Technology, Computer Science M.L.S. The University of Maryland, Library Science B.S and M. Ed. The Pennsylvania State University, Art Education/Museum Studies Gallery Management: Kern Graduate Commons; Zoller Gallery; member Palmer Art Museum ; art certification K-12, Panama (Curundu Jr. High) Publications

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€ Schipper, R.A. (2011). Museum and library partnershi ps: the Panama Canal Museum Joins the Gator Nation, Florida Libraries, 54 (2), Fall 2011. € E. Deumens, L. N. F. Taylor, R. A. Schipper, C. Botero, R. Garcia-Milian, H. F. Norton, M. R. Tennant, S. K. Acord, C. P. Barnes (2011). Research Data Lifecycle Manageme nt: Tools and Guidelines, Research Computing Databases website: http://rcs.columbia.edu/rdlm New York: Columbia University Creative Commons. € Schipper, R.A. (2011). Discovering Panama. In Panama Canal Townsites. Seminole, Florida: Panama Canal Museum, p. 144. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). PCM/UF Partnership Progresse s. Panama Canal Museum Review, Fall/Winter 2010. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). PCM/UF and Library of Congress Plan 100th Anniversary Exhibit. Panama Canal Museum Review, Fall/Winter 2010. € Schipper, R.A. and Daley, M. ( 2010). Welcome to the University of Florida Libraries (video). http://www.youtube.com /watch?v=aZ7Z43qcsxg € Schipper, R.A. and Egolf, K. (2010). The Panama Cana l Museum joins the Gator Nation. Chapter One, Spring 2010. € Schipper, R.A. (2010). Renovations and OffSite Moves. Smathers Libraries web site. http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ pio/renovations.html € Schipper, R.A. (2008). From the Dean. Notes & Quotes: Th e Official Newsletter of the Georgia College & State University Library & Instructional Te chnology Center, no. 2, Fall 2008. € Schipper, R.A. (2007). Book Review: High er Education in the Internet Age. Ge orgia Library Quarterly, vol. 44, no. 3, Autumn 2007. € Schipper, R.A. (2007). From the Dean. Notes & Quotes: Th e Official Newsletter of the Georgia College & State University Library & Instructional Te chnology Center, no. 1, Spring 2007. € Schipper, R.A. (2006). From the ground up. Georgi a Library Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 1, Spring 2006. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). Scarborough Library rededication. The Newsletter of the Scarbo rough Society, vol. 1, no. 2, December 2004. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). Library news. The Newsletter of the Scarborough Society, vol. 1, no. 1, May 2003. € Schipper, R.A. (2003). From the ground up: Library construction. West Virginia Libraries, May 2003. € Schipper, R.A., (2003). Shepherd Colle ge Technology Oversigh t Committee Strategic Pl an. Shepherd College. € Schipper, R.A. and Krist, P.S. (2002). Consideration of learning style, fi eld orientation, format citizen status, and time in Internet instruction. The Journal of Computing in Small Colleges, 17(3), February 2002. € Schipper, R.A. (2000). Computer-assisted instruction, learning style, field orientation, time measurement, and citizen status: bibliographic instruction and college fres hmen. Dissertation: Florida Institute of Technology, Science Education/Computer Science. € Schipper, R.A. and Bonhomme, M. (2000). The Center fo r Distance Learning at Florida Tech Annual Report. Florida Institute of Technology. Key Libraries Staff

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Bess de Farber 2010 NW 36 Drive Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 273-2519, bdefarber@ufl.edu PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE University of Florida (UF) Libraries Grants Manager (October 2008 to present) Responsibilities include: all pre and post award activities relate d to grants projects for nine university libraries. Initiated grants management program for training and mentoring librarians and support staff in grant seeking, submission, and post award activit ies with emphasis on collaborative projects within UF and beyond. Manage all grant-related activities from idea-stage to project completion including developing budgets, project planning and st rategies, interfacing with fund ers, grant writing, and research ing funding opportunities. In fall 2009, established a student grants training program (820 students to date), for finding and prep aring fellowship applications, with Graduate Sc hool and NSF-funded Innovation through Integration and Institutionalization (I3) progr am. Consistently working with Division of Sponsored Research and Contracts & Grants personnel for pre and post award management to ensure compliance with university/sponsor s’ policies, setting up contracts and re vising award budgets/project plans. ASK Associates Principal (May 1995 to present) Responsibilities vary according to contract, including: writing and managing grants pr ograms, developing projects and collabora tions; facilitating planning retreats; creating feasibility studies for new programs; advising executives and board members on managem ent issues; networking with funders, troubleshooting within community to mend relationships, and training staff members to perform grants and other management functions. Client organizations have included: arts and culture, community development, healthcare, education, social service and philanthropic agencies. University of Arizona Libraries Grants & Revenue Manager (May 2005 to September 2008) Responsibilities included pre and post award grants management. Initiated grants seeking program for training and mentoring librarians and staff in grant seeking and post award activities w ith emphasis on collaborative projects. Managed all grant-rela ted activities including developing budgets, project planning and st rategies, interfacing with fund ers, writing, and researching. Consistently worked with Sponsored Projects Department, pre and post award, to ensure complian ce with university/funders polici es, setting up contracts and revising award budgets/project plans. Developed assessments and plans for revenue generating activitie s. All processes were carried out in a team-based organizational envi ronment. Constantly provided facilitation services for collaborat ive projects, meetings and planning retreats. Served as adjunct in structor for the School of Information & Library Services for a graduate course in grantsmanship. Nonprofit Resource Institute (NRI) Co-Founder, Interim Executive Director, Consu ltant (May 1998 through February 2001) Provided comprehensive resources for improving the management and governance of no nprofit organizations in Palm Beach and Martin Counties. Co-founded NRI utilizing an asset-based approach for providing technical assistance and training. Presented t hree workshop series serving over 400 participan ts in these categories: governance/ oper ations; funding; programs/evaluation; and, marketing/communications. Provided one-on-one technical assistance and board training to more than 350 organizations/government entities. Collaborated to strengthen nonprofit grantee complian ce for the Quantum Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Community Foundation, Lost Tree Foundation, United Way, Palm Healthcare Foundation, and Children’s Services Council. Community Foundation for Palm Beach & Martin Counties Program Officer (October 1994 – May 1995) Managed grant review and funding allocations for Social Service, Human and Race Relations, and Arts and Cultural programs in Pa lm Beach and Martin Counties; staffed Human and Race Relati ons planning committee with board/community leaders. Palm Beach County Cultural Council Director of Grants & Organization Services (September 1989 – October 1994) Provided grants management of $2 million in public tourism tax funds annually to 45 Palm Beach County cultural organizations; developed/managed all government and foundation grant appli cations/awards for Cultural Council programs; trained cultural organizations/artists to prepare government, foundation, and corporate grant applications; provided management technical assis tance to cultural organization staff/board members; presented monthl y Cultural Executives Committee events; and provided consulting services for planning and arts-in-education projects statewide.

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Pinellas County Arts Council Financial Manager (May 1985 – September 1989) Managed all financial activity ($400,000 annual budget) of public/private local arts agency, implementing fund accounting. Man aged all grant programs including local, state and re-granting programs, and coordinated local and state government audits. Arts in Education Programs Manager (1987 – 89) Negotiated artist contracts; communicated with professional artists for Arts-in-Education program; scheduled programs; designed curriculum and survey materials for school system distribution; implemented new programs; provided consulting to community artists/arts organizations ; guest speaker for community functions; provided staff training/development for educational organizations; and staffed fund-raising/education committees. EDUCATION/CERTIFICATIONS 2003 Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL: Master of Nonprofit Management 1978 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA: Bachelor of Music in Clarinet Performance 1976 Rollins College, Winter Park, FL: Music and Environmental Studies 2009/2003 International Association of Fac ilitators: Certified Professional Facilitator 2002 AchieveGlobal: Certified Trainer: Frontlin e Leadership and Leadership for Results Modules 2002 Raising More Money Model Training Certification for Board Members 2000 Drucker Foundation: Board Self-Assessment Process 2000 National Center for Nonprofit Boards: Critical Components of Effective Governance RECENT INSTRUCTOR/WORKS HOP PRESENTER/FEATURED SPEAKER/FACILITATOR 2011 University of Florida, Land Grant Agricultural Knowledge Discovery System Virtual Conference 2011 University of Florida, Intro to Grants Seeki ng and International Funds for College of Education 2011 University of Florida, Intro to Grants Seeking for McNair Scholars Program 2010 University of Florida, Strategic Planning Retreat for Department of Biology 2010 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for Honors Freshman Students in the Sciences 2010 University of Florida, Grants Seeking for Museums (Part 1 and 2) 2010 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for Women in Science and Engineering 2010 Florida State University, CoLAB Planning Series for statewide Scholarly Communications Workshop 2010/2011 University of Florida, Grant Seeking Basics for International Students 2010/2011 University of Florida, Collaboration Basics for Grant Seekers, Grant Wr iting Course, PhD candidates 2009/2010 University of Florida, How to Apply for NSF Do ctoral Dissertation Improvemen t Grants (Biology/Various) 2009/2010 University of Florida, How to Apply for Na tional Science Foundation Gra duate Assistant Fellowships 2009 Florida Atlantic University, Into to Grant Se eking, Grant Writing Course, Nonprofit Management 2009 University of Florida, CoLAB Planning Series for College of Fine Arts Fall Faculty Meeting ASK ASSOCIATES, Inc. CLIENTS and CONTRACT SERVICES (Examples) MANAGEMENT SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS • Nonprofit Reso urce Institute (Palm Beach County): Program Devel opment Services for creation of organization from inception; Board Development; Grants Prepara tion and Reporting; Workshop Series development and implementation for two series; facilitation/technical assistance to over 400 organizations. Organizational development for new initiative: Interfaith Health & Wellness Association; Training Services to nonprofit boards; CoLAB Planning Series for 100 organization representatives • Nonprofit Resource Center (Broward): Various Training Services • Volunteer Broward: Board Planning Retreat • Junior League of Boca Raton: CoLAB Planning Series FUNDERS • Community Foundation for Broward: CoLAB Planning Workshops • Children’s Services Council: Planning Services for Fami ly Resource Centers, AchieveGlobal Frontline Leadership • Community Foundation for Palm Beach & Martin Counties: Grantee Organiza tion and Program Consulting Services; • Quantum Foundation: Organizational Development Services for Grantee Organization • Palm Beach County Cultural Council: Training Services fo r new grants administrator • Pew Public Education Fund /Education Foundation: Facilitation of Palm Beach County’s Arts Education Plan • United Way/CSC: CoLAB Planning Series for HIV Prev ention for Teens resulting in collaborative grant proposals • United Way of Martin County: Training for grantees; CoLAB Planning Series for Martin County Literacy • United Way of Palm Beach County: Collaboration Planni ng & Grant Writing Services • Education Foundation of Palm Beach County : Introduction to Grant Writing for Teachers Key Libraries Staff

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Chelsea Dinsmore International and Stat e Documents Librarian Assistant University Librarian Education: University of Texas, Austin, Library and Information Science, MLIS, 1997 University of Florida, History, MA, 1994 New College, Sarasota, FL, History, B.A., 1991 Work Experience: University of Florida Libraries, PO Box 110711, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7011 From: July 2004 To: Present Title: International and State Documents Librarian Rank: Assistant Univer sity Librarian Scope of Duties: The International and State Documents Librarian deve lops, evaluates and provides access and reference service for the collections of international and state documents housed in the George A. Smathers Libraries. Duties include oversigh t of and reference service for the Eu ropean Union Depository and Florida Depository Library Program collection, monitoring standing orders for the publications of international organizations, and developing and maintaining contac t with appropriate faculty and research centers on campus to determine program needs. Also supervis es the activities of the international and state document processing unit and maintains and u pdates the International Documents page of the departmental website, provides ge neral reference at the Documents Department desk, and occasional assistance on the Marston Science reference desk. Special Assignments: American and British History selector with collection management and bibliographic instruction duties. (Aug 2008Aug 2012) Interim Head of Inter Library Loan (May-Aug 2005) Harry Ransom Humanities Research Cent er, University of Texas, Austin, TX From: March 1998 To: October 2003 Title: Professional Librarian Scope of Duties: Created the Patron And Research Information System (PARIS), a cross-departmental database which tracks Ransom Center patrons and their duplication an d use permission requests. This system replaced an amalgam of several department specific Filemaker files, with a centrally managed Access/Coldfusion relational database structure, usab le by everyone. Last project work ed on involved the development and integration of an information system to track the cr eation and storage of digi tized items to accommodate several upcoming digitization initiatives. Publications: Books, contributed: Dinsmore, C., Pilot Grants for Outreach, in Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook 2123. American Library Association, Americ an Library Association. Chicago: 2010. Dinsmore, C., Taking Advantage of Small Grants for Outreach, in Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook 21-23. American Library Association, Am erican Library Association. Chicago: 2010. Russell Gonzalez, S., V. Davis, C. Dinsmore, C. Frey C. Newsom, and L. Taylor, Bioactive: A Game for Library Instruction in Gaming in Academic Libraries: Collections, Marketing, and Information Literacy Association of College and Resear ch Libraries. Chicago: IL, 2008. Arlen, S., C. Dinsmore, M. Davidson, An Introduc tion to Instructional Services in Libraries, Introducing Primary Documents to Undergraduates Haworth Press, New York, 119-134, 2008.

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Articles, refereed: Davis, V., Dinsmore, C., Serving a diverse and ever -changing agricultural sci ences department: Family, Youth & Community in perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Food Information 10 (1). (2009) Dinsmore, C., J. Russell and J. Swan beck, Electronic Transition at the University of Florida, Three Perspectives, Documents to the People Vol. 36, #1, Spring 2009. Grants: External: Principle Investigator, “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” a traveling exhibition and tour are funded by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to the National Constitution Center. Applied for with Colleen Seale and Shelley Arlen. Principle Investigator, Social Entrepreneurs Film Program, PBS/Frontline World grant, $500 (direct), [Sep 15-Nov 17, 2008], a grant program to support screenings and discussions on social entrepreneurs. Principle Investigator, Let’s Talk About It: Jewish Identity and Imagination: o Demons, Golems, and Dybbuks: Monsters of the Jewish Imagination and Modern Marvels: Jewish Adventure in the Graphi c Novel, American Library A ssociation and Nextbook Grant $5000 (direct). [Jan 2008-April 2009]. o Fathers and Daughters in a Changing World, American Library Association and Nextbook Grant, $1500 (direct), [Dec 2005-Dec 2006]. Co-Principle Investigator, Digitizing Hansard’s Br itish Parliamentary Databases, 2nd Series. Library Mini-grant program. $758.37 awarded to fund a p ilot project for digitizing a sample of the Parliamentary Debates. Membership and Service in the Profession: American Library Association (ALA), member, 2004-present ALA Membership Committee, 2005-06 Government Documents Round Tabl e (GODORT), member, 2004-present Membership Committee, committee a ppointment, Chair (05-06), 2004-07 Steering Committee, 2005-06 Publications Committee, co mmittee appointment, 2007-09 Cataloging Committee, ID TF Liaison, committee appointment, 2009-2010 International Documents Task Force, GODORT, ALA, member, 2004-present Chair 2011-2012 Committee Liaison, GODORT Ca taloging Committee, 2009-2012 Agency Liaison for Council of Euro pe, task appointment, 2005-present Florida Library Association, 2007-2009 European Information Association, 2006-2008 Key Libraries Staff

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John Freund University of Florida 20567 NW 257th Ter George A. Smathers Libraries High Springs, Florida 32643 Preservation Department 352-316-1259 Gainesville, Florida 32611 352-273-2835 johfreu@ufl.edu Education B.A., Journalism, 1974, University of Minnesota Certificate in Book and Paper Conservati on, 1980, San Francisco State University. Internship, 1980-81, Sutro Libr ary, San Francisco, California. Internship, 1980-81, San Anselmo Theologi cal Seminary, San Anselmo, California. Professional Experience San Francisco State University. Inst ructor, Bookbinding and Repair, 1981-1983. Taught beginning classes in bookbinding thro ugh the School of De sign And Engineering. Stanford University, Jonnson Library of Government Documents, Manager, Stacks and Circulation, 19811988. Supervised circulation, stack maintenance and also st affed the reference desk. S upervised move of entire collection in and out of the lib rary during renovations of 1985-86. University of Florida, Smathers Library, 1988 to present. Head, Conservation and Book Repair Unit of the Smat hers Libraries Preservation Department. Supervises and trains staff and volunteers performing repair and maintenance of the circ ulating collections, performs complex treatments of restoration and maintena nce of the Special Collections includi ng leather restoration, flat paper and manuscript treatments such as deac idification and encapsulation, provi des grant and project support, environmental monitoring and specialized reference and information on preservation to staff and general public. Research Interests Designer bindings and non traditional book binding. Photographs, especially non paper photography (Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes.) Flat paper restoration.

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Key Libraries Staff Samuel T. Huang University of Florida Libraries P.O. Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 Title: Associate Dean for Development & A dvancement, University Librarian Employment: Associate Dean for Development & Advancement, University Librarian, February 20, 2008University of Florida Associate Dean for External Relations, February, 2006 – February, 2008 University of Arizona Libraries Assistant Dean for External Relations, May 2000 – February 2006 University of Arizona Libraries, Tucson, AZ ( Full Librarian) University Libraries Development Director, 1994 April 2000 Curator, Rare Books & Special Collections, September 1991-April 2000. (Rank: Professor) Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Senior Research Librarian, October 1987 Se ptember 1989. (Rank: Associate Professor). Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Coordinator of Computer Reference Services, July 1985 October 1987. (Rank: Associate Professor) Northern Illinois Univ ersity, DeKalb, IL Coordinator of Library Services for the Physica lly Impaired, Coordinator of Career Collection and References, May 1980 June 1985 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL Assistant Director, Undergraduate Librar y, 1978 1980 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Head, Interlibrary Loan Department and Re ference Librarian, 1973 1978 (Rank: Assistant Professor) Head, Interlibrary Loan, Reference and Rare B ooks Librarian, 1966 1973 (Rank: Instructor). Education: M.S. Degree in Education, No rthern Illinois University M.A. Degree in Library & Information St udies, Northern Illinois University B.A. Degree in English Language & Literatu re, Tamkang Universit y, Taipei, Taiwan. Membership and Service to the Profession: Chair of the Friends of Library Committee 2009 Association of Library Trus tees, Advocates, Friends and Foundation Board member, 2008 Board director of Friends of Library, USA (F LOUSA 2003-2008) ALA LLAMA RFDS Committee 2005-2010, Re-ele cted for the second term, 2010-2012 Academic Library Advancement and Developm ent Network (one of eight founders), 1998 Braddom Scholarship Committee, Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA) 20032005. Board Member (Member-at-Larg e), Fund Raising & Financial Development Section (LAMA), 2003 Leader, Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Li brary Development Discussion Group, 2000 2002.

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Horatio Alger Society Board Director, 2000 2003. Academic Library Advancement and Developm ent Network (ALADN) Conference Committee, 1999. American Library Association member 1975 – Association of Fundraising Professionals member, 2004 – Association of College Research Libraries (ACRL) Member 1975 ACRL RBMS Rare Books and Manuscripts, 1975 ACRL ULS University Libraries Member 1975 Horatio Alger Society Member 1999 – Library Administration and Management Association (LAMA) Member 2000 LAMA PRMS Publication Relati ons and Marketing Section 2000 LAMA FRFDS Fundraising and Financial Development 2000Selected Scholarly Presentations: (Invitations) 06/23/2010 "Things you wish to know about fundraising in Libraries but do not know where to begin: Roadmaps to fundraising success." ALA Annual Conference, Wash ington, D.C. (Invited by FOLUSA) 06/16/2010 "Development Officers as Managers." 2010 DOR AL Annual Meeting, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. 03/22/2010 "Collaborative Fundraising in Achieving the Univ ersity's Mission: It is not all about the libraries," ALADN Annual Conference (Invited by ALADN Program Committee) Santa Monica, CA 03/21/2010 "Library Development 101: Nuts & Bolts." (ALADN Pre-Conferen ce Program). Santa Monica, CA (Invited by AL ADN Program Committee). 11/19/2009 "The Art of Fundraising" Presenter at th e Art of Fundraising and Grant Writing Online Conference,( Invited by Alliance Li brary System, Learning Teams, LLC.) 1000 Attendees registered 07/13.2009 "Fundraising Basics for College and Universi ty Libraries," 2009 AL A Annual Conference (Invited by ALA LLAMA FRFDS Committee) 07/11/2009 "Nuts & Bolts for Academic Library Frie nds", 2009 ALA Annual Conference (Invited by Friends of Library U.S. A.) Selected Publications: Modern Library Technology and Reference Services. New York, Haworth Press, Inc., 1993 (Editor) Co-authored with Veer Steeg, Je nnie. “Reviewing the Literature” in Introduction to Research in Education. 6th edition, by Ary,D. & Jacobs, L. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth P ublishing, Summer 2001 “Communications and Speech” and “Disabilities” in M agazines for Libraries 8th edition, ed. By Bill Katz, N.J, Bowker, 1992, pp. 292-296; 344-353 “Literary Resources on the Employmen t of People with Disabilities” in Library Services for Career Planning, Job Searching, and Employment Opportunities. Ed. By Byron Anderson. New York, the Haworth Press, Inc., August 1992 Author. “Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way: Fundrai sing for the Academic Libraries.” The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2006. Pp. 146-151 All publications include 10 Book Chap ters and 27 Journal Articles.

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Key Libraries Staff Paul S. Losch Associate University Librarian Latin American Collection, University of Florida PO Box 117009 Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 273-2745 plosch@uflib.ufl.edu Library Work Experience June 2002-Present Operations Librarian, Latin American Collection, Smat hers Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. April 2000-June 2002 Senior Library Technical Assistant, Latin American Collection, Smathers Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Education M.S. in Library and Information Studies, School of In formation Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 2003. M.A. in Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Ga inesville, FL, 2002. Master's thesis entitled "Effect of School-based Management on Academic Achievement in Brazil." Postbaccalaureate Teacher Certification Program, Framingham State College, Framingham, MA, 1994. Certificates for Spanish (Grades 5-12) and Social St udies (Grades 9-12), with endorsement for Bilingual Education. B.A. magna cum laude in Spanish and Political Science, Clark Universi ty, Worcester, MA, 1993. Teaching Experience August 2000-Present (various semesters) Portuguese Instructor, Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Florida. August 1995-June 1997 Teacher of English as a Second Language, Pan American School of Bahia, Brazil. August 1994-June 1995 Spanish Teacher, Lancaster (MA) Middle School. Professional Organizations LASA (Latin American Studies Association). Member since 2000. Attended 2000, 2001, 2003 Conferences.

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SALALM (Seminar on Acquisition of Latin American Libr ary Materials). Member since 2002. Executive Board Member (2010-2013). Selected Publications and Exhibits “Dr. Henry W. Furniss, Cnsul Afro-N orte-Americano na Bahia, 1898-1905,” Revista Afro-sia (Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil), Vol. 40 (2009), pp.223-258. “The 1939 Visit of Gabriela Mistral” El Escribano: the St. Augustine Journal of History Vol. 45 (2008), pp. 124-143. “Then & Now: Celebr ating 75 Years of Latin American Studies.” CLASNotes [Publication of the UF College of Libe ral Arts and Sciences]. February 2006, pp.4-5. Valk, Barbara G., Hispanic American Periodicals Index 2003 UCLA Latin American Center, 2004 [Con tributing Indexer]. Brazil’s Popular Groups 1966-1986 Supplement 12. 2002. Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress Preservation Microfilming Program : Available from Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 2004. [Principal Indexer] Co-curator of various exhibits at the University of Florida, including those in Special and Area Studies Collections and in university art galleries, including “Padre Ccero: A View from the Ralph della Cava Gift” (2007), “Visions of Bahia, Brazil, from the Frances F. Switt Collection” (2008) and “Cuba: Past, Present and Future” (2009). Languages and Travel Fluent in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Reading knowledge of French. Extensive Travel in Spain and Latin America

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Key Libraries Staff Randall David Renner renner@ufl.edu Education 1994 1997 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Photography. 1987 1990 Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida. Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Photography; cum laude Employment 2002-Present University of Florida Libraries, Digital Library Center. Operations Manager, Library Associate 3. Supervision of daily operations of the Digital Libra ry Center including Bibliographic Control, Imaging, Quality Control, Optical Character Recognition, and Archiving. 8/2001-10/2002 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Photography Department. Photographer Responsible for implementation and daily operation of digital imaging services for the campus wide photographic service bureau; including equipment specification, integration, production, and quality control. Responsibilities also included photographing museum and library collect ions in a studio environment and on location. Other duties included traditional black and white photographic printing and processing, E-6 processing and maintenance, and other technical photographic processes. 1/2001–8/2001 University of Florida, Office of Academic Technology. Center for Instructional Technology and Training. Training Specialist Responsible for conducting training seminars of software programs to faculty and staff. This included development of graphic software training programs, and development of the Instructional Computing Activities Training Program. Various seminar content included: Digital Media, Web Site Development, Photoshop, Web Graphics, Digital Video, Acrobat, and The Effective Use of Laptops. 1999 – 2000 University of Florida, Department of Art and Art History. Adjunct Assistant Professor Responsible for curriculum development, instruction, and evaluation, and of the undergraduate digital arts class, Computer Art: Montage. 1998 – 2000 University of Florida Brain Institute Teaching Lab Resources. Audio Visual Specialist Management of multimedia and classroom support activities within the Brain Institute, including multimedia auditorium, conference rooms, audio/video building distribution and Surgical Research and Training Lab. Scheduling, setup, and maintenance of all multimedia and teleconferencing equipment. Performed preventive and corrective maintenance, and instruction of multimedia resources to faculty and staff.

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1994 – 1997 University of Florida, Biomedical Media Services, Photography/Graphics Departments. Photographer Responsibilities included the design and creation of photographic and graphic media including images, text, charts, and graphs. The processing, printing and digital transfer of biomedical, scientific, and public relations subjects in both film based and digitally generated formats for teaching, research, publication and display. 1994 1997 University of Florida, Department of Art Gainesville, Florida. Graduate Teaching Assistant / Instructor Responsible for curriculum development, instruction, and evaluation of undergraduate photography courses in the Fine Arts department. Courses taught included Black and White Photography, Figure/Ground, and Image/Order/Idea. 1991 1993 U Mac International Language Academy, Nishi-Koiwa, Tokyo, Japan. Program Coordinator / Instructor Developed specialized English language curriculum, and provided English language instruction to Japanese students of all age groups in business, classroom, and individualized settings. 1988 1991 Florida State University, Department of Art Tallahassee, Florida. Color Darkroom Manager Designed, supervised and maintained the art department’s color darkroom facility consisting of a photographic studio, a 10 workstation color darkroom, and a Durst RCP-50 processor.

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Key Libraries Staff Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler l.s.wheeler@ufl.edu • (352) 273 – 2564 E D U C A T I O N M aster of A r ts in M useology 2009 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL B achelor of F ine A r ts in C r eative Photography, M inor in A r t H istor y 2003 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL P R O F E SSI O N A L E X P E R I E N C E E xhibits C oor dinator 2012 p r esent George A. Smathers Libraries, Univer sity of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Provide technical and design support for e xhibits in library departments/branches € Coordinate incoming and outgoing loans € Coordinate scheduling and hosting of traveling exhibits € Design physical and online exhibits, collateral materials and multimedia companion content € Collect and analyze data for assessing th e effectiveness of the exhibition program T echnical T r aine r T r anslator and D esigne r 2006 p r esent Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) € Train local and international partner institutions in the digitization process, including adherence to copyright, metadata creation, specific equipment us e, current digitization standards and image manipulation € Contribute and translated content for the multilingual technical manual, website, promotional materials and software € Design promotional materials including pos ters, bookmarks and multimedia presentations € Transfer image-only designs into HTML and CSS for web display and online exhibit functionality M useum & Special P roj ects C oor dinator 2009 2011 Digital Library Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Served as the primary lia ison with museum partners € Developed online exhibits € Created supporting print mate rials and multimedia presentatio ns for the Digital Collections € Designed UF Digital Collections elements including page banners/headers and buttons € Assisted patrons and faculty in locating originals featured in th e Digital Collections as well as utilizing the digital objects in their resear ch, publications, presenta tions and/or teaching € Researched copyright of items to be included in the Digital Co llections and/or digital exhibits D igital P roduction Supe r visor 2005 2009 Digital Library Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL € Oversaw the primary digitization produc tion queue, which included books, documents, photographs, and other archival materials € Supervised imaging staff, includi ng 1 full-time and 15 part-time employees

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Prepared archival and library materials for digital imaging, including assessing need for preservation and equipment suitability € Monitored imaging quality for adherence to digitization standards and best practices S E L E C T E D E X H I B I T I O NS A R T B O U N D 2011 T he 2nd A nnual Student A rtists' Book Competition 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/exhibits/artbound2011 € Designed and created online exhibit to complement temporary physical exhibit A C elebration of Jewish L ife and C ulture A round the World 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ex hibits/jewishculture € Curated online exhibit with the Head and Senior Library Technical Assistan t of the Price Library € Designed all exhibit elements 30 Years of the Price L ibrary: T reasures from the Isser and Rae Price L ibrary of Judaica 2011 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/exhibits/30years € Curated online exhibit with the Head and Senior Library Technical Assistan t of the Price Library € Designed all exhibit elements C arteles: C uban and M exican F ilm Posters from the E fran B arradas Collection 2010 http://www.dloc.com/exhibits/carteles € Curated, designed and wrote corr esponding texts for online exhibit F rom C anals to Conservation : A n E xhibit of the H istorical E verglades 2009 http://ufdc.ufl.edu/swamp/exhibitover € Curated and designed online exhibit Photographic F ormalities: from A nsel Adams to Weegee 2007 Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL € Assisted museum Registrar and Curator of Phot ography in exhibit prep aration, including object packing, handling and transport from donor’s house to the museum € Researched artworks/artists and wrote corresponding exhibit labels P U B L I C A T I O NS Nemmers, Laura and Lourdes Santamara-Wheeler, "Advancing Digitization: Art and Technology," in Samuel P. H arn Museum of Art at Twenty Years: The Collection C atalogue, ed. Jason Steuber, Laura K. Nemmers, and Tracy E. Pfaff (Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010), 227231. S E L E C T E D P R E S E N T A T I O NS Society of F lor ida A r chivists A nnual M eeting 2009 "The Basics of Digitizing Coll ections" (with Laurie N. Taylor) F lor ida A ssociation of M useums A nnual C onfe r ence 2008 "Developing Collaborative Opportuniti es to Increase Accessibility to Exhibitions and Collections Online" (with Dwight Bailey and Susan Cooksey)

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Key Libraries Staff Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig ________________ Education: University of Michigan, Department of History, PhDABD University of Pennsylvania Department of Biology, Master of Arts. 1986-1991 Brown University A.B. in Biology, magna cum laude. 1979-1984 Courtesy Faculty Appointments, University of Florida Department of History, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for African Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for the Arts in Healthcare Resear ch and Education, College of Fine Arts Employment: 2001-present University of Florida, J. H. Miller Health Science Center Librar ies, Office of Senior Vice President, Health Affairs, and College of Medicine, Archi vist and Ed. Coor. Create archives,and history program; Director of Medical Humanities, Narr. Medicine & Medical Humanities programs, run Medical Student Reading Room activities. Washington State University 1997-2000 Faculty member, Department of English, Assistant Director Writing Lab & Coordinator, English 102; Tier I and Tier II Reader, P lacement Exams and University Writing Portfolio ; Instructor, English composition ; Adjunct Professor, Department of History. 1996 Writing Tutor, English 102. University of Idaho 1995 Assistant, Herbarium. 1994-1995 Laboratory Assistant, Department of Biology. 1992-1993 Adjunct Professor, Department of History. Teaching Experience: University of Florida 2011 (Fall) Undergraduate: (Un)Common Read course on H.G. Wells’, The Island of Dr. Moreau. (Spring) Undergraduate: (Un)Common Read course with focus on Barbar a Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. 2008present (Spring) Undergraduate courses: Medical Humanities and Clinical Practice, Junior Honors Seminar. Medical Student courses: Health and the Environment 4th year elective; Lecturer, Biomedical Ethics course. 2007-present (Fall and Spring) Medical Student courses: Small group leader, Essentials of Patient Care 1 & 2 2007, 2008 and 2010, 2011 (Spring) Undergraduate courses : Culture Health and the Arts in Sub-Saha ran Africa and the US, team taught with Jill Sonke-Henderson, CAHRE, and James Oliverio of the Digital Worlds Institute 2006-present Director of Medical Humanities Program with associated educational programs for medical students; (Fall and Spring) Medical Student Courses: Interdisciplinary Family Health 2004-2006 (Spring) Undergraduate courses: Junior Honors, medical humanities seminar. 2004present (Spring) Medical Student courses: HEART, AMSA 2002present Medical Student courses: various teaching commitments including: (Fall, Spring and Summer) Narrative Medicine and Medical Humanities elective; (Fall) Biomedical Ethics small group leader 2000-2003 Department of History: Intro. to Am. His. to 1877; His. Am. Med.; Honors His. Med Washington State University 1997-2000 Instructor, and Faculty, Department of En glish, Intro. to Writing; Hist. of Western Med.; Am. Slavery; Western Expl; Urban His tory. Poster@, Professional Discussions+, Conference Presentations#, and Invited Talks* +2011 July University of Florida, BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research. May 1. Led discussion on the movie I Am at the Hippodrome Theater, Gainesville 2. UF Talk on Body Snatching and medical dissection, to accompany traveling exhibition on Frankenstein. *March UF Talk History of African Americans in the medical profession, for SNMA meeting, University of Florida. *2010 November 13, UF, Talk: Medical Tourism, for international health seminar. #October 7-9 Arnold p. Gold Foundation, Gold Foundation Biennial Conf., pres. on Humanism Chapter projects. *August, UF, Talk: HOM Lect. Series, Balancing the humors and easing the arteries: bleeding in western medicine. UF Med. Ed. Journal Club : Medical Tourism and its implications for medical education. +July, UF: Arts in Medicine Summer Intens ive, Member of Discussion Panel on arts-in-medicine programs. #May, CIRN, Narrative Matters Conference, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, Panel presentation on collaborative project on narrative with Department of English *March, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Talk: Media representations and pharmaceutical advertising. *February, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Talk: Medical Tourism and Medical Ethics. *2009 November, UF, Talk: History of Medicine Lecture Series: Dr. Cade, Gatorade and the Promotion of Innovation. *July, UF, Talks: 1. History of science class: Eugenics and the Black Stork. 2. University of Florida, BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research. +June, UF: Reflective Writing Session for Arts in Medicine Summer Intensive February, Talks: 1. Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, History of Medicine lecture series: *“Building Toward Perfec tion”: George Harrell's Medical School Dreams and Realities *2. University of Florida History of Science Symposium: Eugenics Reflected: Ideas on Eugenics, Politi cs, and Heredity in Literature and Poetry. *2008 November, UF, Invited talk : History of Medicine lecture series Practice and Change in Native Amer ican Healing, Gainesville, FL #Hippodrome Theater Led discussion on movie Gainesville, FL Invited talk SNMA Conference History of African Americans in the Healing Professions, Jacksonville, FL *October, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Invited talk : Mendel’s Theater: Popularizing Eugenics in America. Gainesville, FL #Hippodrome Theater Led discussion on movie Elsa y Fred, Gainesville, FL #September: Invited attendance at Arnold P. Gold Foundation Biennial Meeting *June, UF, Invited talk: BOE minority graduate school program talk on conducting historical research *May, UF, Talk: History of Medicine Lecture Series. Mendel’s Theater: Popularizing Eugenics in America.

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*Invited talk : Creating a Culture of Humanism, COM, FSU *April, Invited talk: Creating a Medical Humanities Program, COM, FSU +March, Hippodrome Theater, Led discussion of movie The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Gainesville, FL *2007 November, UF Med. Ed. Journal ClubEmpathy and medical education *Generalists in Medical Education Conf.: talk “Using theater for public health interventions in medica l education” and roundtable “Teaching Medical Students to ‘See’” #September, Invited attendance at Arnold P. Gold Foundation conference *August, UF, CPET, Talk History of medicine lecture. *UF, The Black Stork and Eugenics in America. Invited lecture, History of Science course. #April AAMC SGSA meeting Poster presentations and roundtable discussion. *March, UF: Med. Ed. Journal Club : Art and observation in medical education *February, UF, HOS Society: Publicizing Eugenics. *2006 December, UF, Talk: The Black Stork: The Histor y of Eugenics in America HOM Series, COM. *October, UF, Talk: The History of the College of Medicine’s Early Faculty. 50th anniversary celebration, COM *UF, Talk: History of Women in Medicine, HOMLecture Series *September, UF, Talk: History of Women in the Health Science Center, Changing the Face of Medicine special events +April Conducted writing workshop for HEART elective, Ben Lomond, CA *February, SAHMS, Conference talk: Building Utopia in North Florida. *2005 December, UF, Talk: The Human Drama: Siting and Pkanning a Health Center, HOM Lecture Series, COM.. *March, UF, Invited Talk: The Extent of Eugenics Programs in the United States. HOS Society *February, SAHMS Conference Talk: From Social Stigma to Phil the sore: Antibiotics and syphilis. *2004November, UF, Invited Talk: Infectious disease and history HOM Lecture Series, COM *September, Conference talk, presentation on innovative programs to eliminate racially-based health disparities *May, UF, Talk: Infectious disease and history. HOM Lecture Series, COM *March, UF, Invited Talk: Women in Medicine at the University of Florida, talk for AMWA, COM *Febuary, Conference talk, N. Stoyan-Rosenzweig M. Hudson, and E. Dunbar. Symposium: Eugen., her. & the body pol: pop. and ind understandings. SAHMS. #February UF Psychoanalysis and Narrative Medicine Conference : Paper presented and workshopped at roundtable. *2003 March, Institute for Learning in Retirement, Invited Talk: Impact of disease on history. *2002 November UF, Talk: Eugenics and ideas about the nature of heredityHOM Lecture Series, COM *October UF, Talk: Eugenics of H.G. WellsHOM Lecture Series, COM *February UF, Talk: World medicine traditions and the idea of balancing the humorsHOM Lecture Series, COM #2001 November, GEMCS Conference, Philadelphia, PA, Talk : Expanding the Domestic Sphere: Farm as Utopia. *September, UF, Invited talk: Popularizing eugenicsHistory of Medicine Lecture Series,COM #2000 M. Farrington, C. Nelson, B. Pickford, and N. Stoyan-Rosenzweig 2000 Research Network Forum; CCCC Annual Convention. Minneapolis, MN *Condon, W., L. Johnson-Shull, D. Kelly-Riley, S. McLeod, N. Stoyan Rosenzweig and Victor Villanueva. 2000 When WPA Becomes WPAs: Issues on a Multiple WPA Campus. CCCC Annual Convention. Minneapolis, MN #1999 Condon, W., L. Johnson-Shull, D. Kelly-Riley, S. McLeod, N. Stoyan Rosenzweig 1999. Building Before Blueprints: Writing Programs Role in Renovating Undergraduate Education. CCCC Annual Convention. Atlanta, GA @1996 Harrington, J.M., Schneider, G. M., N.C. Stoyan Cummings, D.M., and Rosenzweig, R.F. Recovery and Analysis of Community DNA from Heavy Metal Contaminated Lake Sediments. Am Soc. for Microbiology Annual Mtg. New Orleans, LA. *N.C. Stoyan and Rosenzweig, R.F. Patterns of carbon allocation and energy change among yeast overexpressing glycolitic enzymes. Annual Ye ast Genetics Meeting, Genetics Society of America. Madison, WI. Publications: € McCarthy, K., A. Spring, M. Burg, C. Shehan, N. S.-R. and E. Taylor. The History of Women at the U. of F. (2004) € Place, A.R., N.C. Stoyan R.E. Ricklefs & R. Butler (1989) “The physiological basis for stomach oil formation in Leach’s storm petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Auk 106:687-699 € Castro, G.C., N.C. Stoyan & J. P. Myers (1989) “Assimilation efficiency in birds: a function of taxon or food type?” Comp. Biochem. & Physiol. 92A:271-278 € Place, A.R., N.C. Stoyan & R.E. Ricklefs (1987) “Transient steatorrhea may be responsi ble for pre-fledging weight loss in chicks of Leach’s storm petr el, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Bulletin of Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. € -----------------------------------------------------(1987) “The physiologica l basis of stomach oil formation in Leach’s stor m petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa.” Bulletin of Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. € Anderson, D.A., N.C. Stoyan & R.E. Ricklefs(1987) “Why are there no viviparous birds? A Comment.” Am.Nat. 130:941-7 Articles: The PostHealth Center News and Communications Florida Physician. Society of Florida Archivists. Annotations. Society of Florida Archivists. Key Libraries Staff Laurie N. Taylor Digital Humanities Librarian, Digital Library Center/Digital Services University of Florida Libraries

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ADDRESS: Digital Libr ary Center TEL: 352.273.2902 Smathers Library FAX: 352.846.3702 P.O. Box 117003 EMAIL: Laurien@ufl.edu University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-7003 EDUCATION: Ph.D. 2006 University of Florida, English/Digital Humanities RECENT POSITIONS HELD 2011 Digital Humanities Librarian, Digital Library Center/Digital Services, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2008 – 2011 Interim Director, Digital Library Center, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida 2007 – 2008 Digital Projects Librarian, Dig ital Library Center, George A. Smat hers Libraries, University of Florida 2006 – 2007 Associate Director, Flexible Learning, Division of Continuing Edu cation, University of Florida PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Technical Director, Digital Library of the Ca ribbean & Caribbean News paper Digital Library Technical Director, Florida Digital Newspaper Library Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations Representative, Delegate Assembly of the Modern Language Association Member, American Library Association RECENT AWARDS, FELLO WSHIPS, AND GRANTS € Digital Humanities Collaboration (UF F aculty Enhancement Opportunity Grant; 2012) € Digital Library of the Caribbean, Digital Scholarship and Scholar S upport from Florida International University (FIU) Libraries (F IU Technology Fee Grant; 2011-2013) € Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library (Department of Education; 2009-2014) € America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades (Nati onal Historic Publications and Records Commissions, 2009-2011) PUBLICATIONS Selected Refereed Publications € “Increasing Access to Agricultural Publications Usi ng Digital Repositories and the Semantic Web,” coauthored with Val Davis, Stephen Williams, Dina Benson, Sara Russell Gonzalez and Mark Sullivan. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Digital Libraries 2010. € "Developing an Open Access, Multi-Institutional, International Digital Library," co-authored with Brooke Wooldridge and Mark Sullivan. Resource Sharing & Information Networks 2009. € "Gothic Bloodlines in Survival Horror Gaming," Horror Video Games: Essays on the Fusion of Fear and Play. Ed. Bernard Perron. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009: 46-61. € "Snow White in the City: Teaching Fables, Nursery Rhymes, and Revisions in Graphic Novels," in Approaches to Teaching the Graphic Novel. Ed. Stephen E Tabachnick. New York: MLA, 2009. € Playing the Past: Video Ga mes, History, and Memory, co-edited with Zach Whalen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008. € "Bioactive," in Gaming in Academic Libraries Casebook, co-authored with Sara Russell Gonzalez, Valrie Davis, Carrie Newsom, Chelsea Dinsmore, Cynthia Frey, and Kathryn Kennedy. Ed. Amy Harris and Scott Rice. ACRL, 2008. € "Gaming Ethics, Rules, Etiquette and Learning." Handbook of Research on E ffective Electronic Gaming in Education. Ed. Richard E. Ferdig. Information Science Reference, 2008.

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€ "Console Wars: Console and Computer Games," in The Player's Realm: Studies on the Culture of Video Games and Gaming. Eds. J. Patrick Williams and Jonas He ide Smith. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2007: 223-237. € "Cameras, Radios, and Butterflies: the Influence and Importance of Fan Networks for Game Studies." Fibreculture Journal 8 (2006). € "Gaming's Non-Digital Predecessors," collabor atively written with Cathlena Martin, in The International Digital Media & Arts Association Journal 2.1 (Spring 2005): 25-29. € "Open Source and Academia," co-a uthored with Brendan Riley, in Computers and Composition Online (Spring 2004): http://www.bgsu.edu/ cconline/tayloriley/intro.html. € "When Seams Fall Apart: Video Game Space and the Player," in Game Studies: the International Journal of Computer Game Research 3.2 (Dec. 2003): http://www.gamestudies.org/0302/taylor/. SELECTED PRESENTATIONS € "The Role of Digital Libraries in Disaster Prep aredness and Mitigation," presentation with Brooke Wooldridge. Association of Caribbe an University, Research and Inst itutional Libraries (ACURIL) 2011 Conference, Tampa, FL: Jun. 1, 2011. € "Save America's Treasures Grant for Flagler College Maps Collaborative with UF," presentation with John Nemmers, John Freund, and Leslee Keys. Society of Florida Archivists (SFA) 2011 Conference, St. Augustine, FL: May 5, 2011. € “UF Smathers Libraries Publishing Services,” presenta tion with Isabel Silver. Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Librar y Publishing Services Workshop, Ge orgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA: May 5, 2011. € "Practical Steps Towards Your Lo cal and/or Regional Digitalisati on Project," at the Seminar for Libraries of the Dutch Caribbean Curaao, University of the Netherlands Antilles. Willemstad, Curaao: September 25-6, 2008. € “Choices for Building Digital Libraries.” Presented for The College of The Bahamas’ Virtual Library Committee, The College of The Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas: Mar. 3, 2008.

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PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner Legal name of applicant organization (Sa from Face Sheet) : 1. Legal name of partner organization : Panama Canal Museum, Inc. 2. Partner DUNS number: 144619413 3. Mailing address : Street1: 7985 113th Street, Suite 100 Street2: City: Seminole State: FL Zip+4 : 33772-4785 4 Partner Web address: http://www. panamacanalmuseum.org 5. Partner project contact name : Joseph J. Wood Title: President Telephone number: (850) 668-8936 E-mail: pccjoebev@comcast.net 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): D State Govemment Nonprofit with 501 ( c )3 IRS Status (Other than D County Government Institution of Higher Education) D City or Township Government D Nonprofit without 501 ( c )3 IRS Status (Other than D Special District Government Institution of Higher Education) D Regional Organization D Private Institution of Higher Education D U.S. Territory or Possession D Individual D Independent School District D For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) D Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning D Small Business D Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally D Hispanic-serving Institution Recognized) D Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's) D Indian/Native American Tribal Government D Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) (Other than Federally Recognized) D Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions D IndianlNative American Tribally Designated Organization D Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity D Public/Indian Housing Authority D Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organization's mission? [500 characters] To document, interpret and articulate the role of the United States in the history of Panama, with emphasis on the construction, operation maintenance and defense of the Panama Canal and the contributions to its success by people of all nationalities. 8. Describe the partner organization's service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The PCM's constituency is spread throughout the US and around the world, with over 2000 members and donors, consisting primarily of former employees of the Panama Canal; members of the Defense Department and other US Agencies who served in Panama or the Canal Zone; contractors of those agencies; other residents of the Canal Zone and Panama; dependents of all the foregoing; and anyone having an interest in the preservation of the history of the United States in Panama 9. List the partner's key roles and responsibilities in the project: [1000 characters] The Panama Canal Museum has a shared responsibility with the University of Florida and others in the formulation of plans and ideas, providing funds from its own resources and assisting the advisory group in obtaining additional funding related to the creation and development of a major exhibit to commemorate the 1001h Anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal. The Museum will make available for the exhibit its entire collection consisting of documents, photographs, historical artifacts and other objects and materials, which are expected to comprise a significant portion of the exhibit. The Museum's Board of Trustees is totally

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committed to the project and will provide to the University of Florida/Panama Canal Advisory Group any background knowledge, expertise or historical perspective pertinent to the identification, interpretation and display of the materials to be used in the exhibit. Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization's agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set forth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comply with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines B. Prior to submission of the application, the applicant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a Signed original of this Partnership Statement for the applicant's records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS. PAtA/A;'Hn /Z1u.eUh'l Jd./y Y; :l OJ //

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner. Legal name of applicant organization (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida 1. Legal name of partner organization: Florida Muse um of Natural History, University of Florida 2. Partner DUNS number: 969663814000 3. Mailing address: Street1: 1659 Museum Road Street2: PO Box 117800 City: Gainesville State: FL Zip+4: 32611-7800 4. Partner Web address: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu 5. Partner project contact name: Douglas S. Jones Title: Director Telephone number: 352-273-1901 E-mail: dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): State Government County Government Nonprofit with 501 ( c ) 3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) City or Township Government Special District Government Nonprofit without 501( c )3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) Regional Organization Private Institution of Higher Education U.S. Territory or Possession Individual Independent School District Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) Small Business Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally Recognized) Hispanic-serving Institution Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Other than Federally Recognized) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Indian/Native American Tribally Designated Organization Public/Indian Housing Authority Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organization’s mission? [500 characters] The Florida Museum of Natural History – Understanding, preserving and interpreting biological diversity and cultural heritage to ensure their survival for future generations 8. Describe the partner organization’s service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The Florida Museum of Natural History serves a variety of constituents, including: 1. World-wide researchers 2. The general public (200,000 physical visitors/yr); primary audiences draw from a 50-mile radious of Gainesville, FL (five counti es) in addition to statewide 3. University and college facult y, staff, students and alumni 4. PreK-12 teachers and students 5. 900+volunteers and 900 members 6. The museum has a highly-vi sited website with over 18 million pages viewed per year 9. List the partner’s key roles and responsibilitie s in the project: [1000 characters] The FLMNH will be developing a complimentary exhibit on the natural and geological history of Panama and the Canal Zone. The content and specimens included in this exhibit w ill be derived from the Museum's NSF PIRE project Partnerships in International Res earch and Education. FLMNH's PI RE project is centered upon the widening of the Panama Canal and excavations that FLMNH curators and students are conducting on

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. newly revealed strata. Analysis of data and specimens from these ex cavations will shed new light on the transition of Panama from aquatic to terrestr ial environment over time and the subsequent transcontinental migration of spec ies between North and South America. Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization’s agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set fo rth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comp ly with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines. B. Prior to submission of the application, the app licant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a signed original of this Pa rtnership Statement for the applicant’s records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS.

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT Complete one of these forms for each formal partner. Legal name of applicant organization (5a from Face Sheet): University of Florida 1. Legal name of partner organization: Samuel P. Harn Musuem of Art 2. Partner DUNS number: 969663814000 3. Mailing address: Street1: corner of Hull Rd. and SW 34th St. University of Florida Street2: PO Box 112700 University of Florida City: Gainesville State: FL Zip+4: 32611-2700 4. Partner Web address: http://www.harn.ufl.edu 5. Partner project contact name: Susan Cooksey Title: Curator of African Art Telephone number: (352) 392-9826 x 2141 E-mail: secook@harn.ufl.edu 6. Governing control of partner (choose one): State Government County Government Nonprofit with 501 ( c ) 3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) City or Township Government Special District Government Nonprofit without 501( c )3 IRS Status (Other than Institution of Higher Education) Regional Organization Private Institution of Higher Education U.S. Territory or Possession Individual Independent School District Public/State Controlled Institution of Higher Learning For-Profit Organization (Other than Small Business) Small Business Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Federally Recognized) Hispanic-serving Institution Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) Indian/Native American Tribal Government (Other than Federally Recognized) Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs) Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions Indian/Native American Tribally Designated Organization Public/Indian Housing Authority Nondomestic (non-U.S.) Entity Other (specify) 7. What is the partner organizatio n’s mission? [500 characters] The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art promotes the power of the arts to inspire and educate people and enrich their lives. To this purpose the museum builds and maintains exemplary art collections and produces a wide variety of challenging, innovative ex hibitions and stimulating educational programs. As an integral part of the University of Florida, the museum advances teac hing and research and serves as a catalyst for creative engagement between the unive rsity and diverse local, state, national and 8. Describe the partner organization’s service area (audience served, including size, demographic characteristics and geographic area) [500 characters] The Harn Museum of Art serves the approximately 240,082 residents of Alachua County and outlying popul ations of north central Florida. The museum attracts scholars, artists and visitors from around the world. The museum currently has approximately 841 members. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the general demographics of Alachua County are as follows: Ethnicity: White 73.7% African-American 19.5%, Hispanic or Latino origin 7.3%, Asian4.7%, American Indian and Alaska Natives 0.3%. 9. List the partner’s key roles an d responsibilities in the project: [1000 characters] The Harn Museum of Art will host an exhibition on Panamanian art.The cura tor, Susan Cooksey, will choose the objects and oversee the installation. Registration staff will handle t he crating, shipping and installation. It will include a variety of mediums, and include representative examples of both ancient and contemporary art

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OMB Number 3137-0071, Expiration date: 08/31/2013. forms.Work will be borrowed from the partner unit, and outside institutions and private collections. The exhibition will llikely be held in a 2000 square foot sp ace and open in August 2014 (closing date TBD). Please note: A. Submission of this application by the Authorized Representative of the applicant organization reflects the partner organization’s agreement with the following statements: We will carry out the activities described above and in the application narrative. We will use any federal funds we receive from the applicant organization in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations as set fo rth in the program guidelines and the terms and conditions of the grant award. We assure that our facilities and programs comp ly with the applicable federal requirements and laws as set forth in the program guidelines. B. Prior to submission of the application, the app licant will ensure that the partner organization has provided to the applicant a signed original of this Pa rtnership Statement for the applicant’s records. Such original will be made available to IMLS, if requested by IMLS.

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1 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Specifications for Projects that Develop Digital Products Part I. Complete the appropriate sections: A. Converting Non-Digital Material to Digital Format A1. Describe types and original formats of materials to be sele cted for digitization and quantity of each. The grant will digi tize an assortment of materials in support of glo bal access to the merged collections. Materials to be digitized will include: archival letters, historical photographs, newspapers from microfilm, arti stic and fabric items, oral histories, books, government documents, reports, and other materials that directly suppor t the Centennial events and researcher and outreach needs. Materials to be digitized will be selected by subjec t matter expert curators, librarians, and researchers representing the nee ds and interests of scholarly and public access and the concerns from representatives from both the George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum community. Conservation and preser vation concerns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digitization. An example listing of ma terials to be digitized could include: Photographs: 2,000; Arc hival pages: 1,000; Rare, bound books: 10; 35mm s lides: 15; Printed newspaper pages (singl e broadsheet size): 200; Large format maps and drawings: 22; Microfilm reels (digitiz ed through a vendor, meeting NDNP standards): 10. A2. Identify copyright issues and other potential restrictions with regard to the original non-digital material. Public domain: 100 % of total Permissions have been obtained: % of total Privacy concerns: % of total. Plan to address: Other: % of total. Explain: Permissions to be requested: % of total Plan to address: UF has an established permissions reques t policy, process, and templates for requesting and receiving permissions: http://digital .uflib.ufl.edu/proced ures/copyright/. A3. Describe how the newly digitized material will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to digitized material, and sp ecify what percentage if any of the tot al material will be subject to restrictions. All materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF Digital Collections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu /) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All (100%) materials will be openly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. A4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, w hether purchased, leased or outs ourced, that will be used (e.g., camera, scanner, server, A/D audio or video converter): All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib .ufl.edu/technologies/technologies.htm B. Repurposing Existing Digital Content B1. Describe types and original formats of digital mate rials to be selected for repurposing and quantity of each. Materials will be selected by subject matter experts and in c onsultation with representatives from both the George A. Smather s Libraries and the Panama Canal Museum. Digital preservation conc erns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digital ingest. An example listing of materials to be ingested from born digital files include born digital oral history files with audio and PDF transcripts, web files from the Panama Ca nal Museum, and others already digitally available in the UF Digital Collections (http://ufdc.uf l.edu/) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). B2. Identify copyright issues and other potential restrictions with regard to the original digital material. Public domain 80 % of total Permissions have been obtained: 20 % of total Permissions to be requested: % of total Privacy concerns: % of total. Plan to address:

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2 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Other: % of total. Explain: Plan to address: B3. Describe how the repurposed material will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to repurposed material, an d specify what percentage if any of the to tal material will be subject to restrictions. A ll materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF D igital Collections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu /) and Digital Library of the Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All (100%) materials will be openly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. B4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, whet her purchased, leased or outsourced, that will be used (e.g. MPEG encoder, non-linear editing system, GIS software). All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib .ufl.edu/technologies/technologies.htm C. Creating New Digital Content C1. Describe types of materials to be created in digital form and quantity of each. The grant will digitize an assortment of materials in support of global access to the merged collections. Materials to be digit ized may include: archival letters, historical photographs, newspapers from microfilm, artistic and fabr ic materials, oral histories books, government documents, reports, and ot her materials that directly support the Centennial events and researcher and outreach needs. Materials to be digitized will be selected by s ubject matter expert curators, librarians, and scholars represen ting the needs and interests of scholarly and public access and t he concerns from representativ es from both the George A. Smathers Libraries and the Panama Canal Mus eum. Conservation and preservation concerns will also be determining factors in the selection of materials for digitization. An example listing of materials to be digitized could include: Photographs: 2,000; Archival pages: 1,000; Rare, bound books: 10; 35mm slides: 15; Printed newspaper pages (single broadsheet size): 200; Large format maps and drawings: 22; Microfilm reels (dig itized through a vendor, m eeting NDNP standards): 10. C2. Describe plan to obtain releases/permissions from project content creators and subjects. UF has an established permissions request policy, proce ss, and templates for requesting and receiving permissions: http://digital.ufl ib.ufl.edu/procedures/copyright/ C3. Describe disposition of ownership and use rights of new pr oduct. Describe how the new product will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and c onditions of use. Identify and explain any restrictions that will apply to new con tent and specify what percentage if any of the tota l material will be subject to restrictions. All materials will be accessible through the fully, freely, and openly available UF Digital Co llections (http://ufdc.ufl.edu/) and Digital Library of t he Caribbean (http://dloc.com). All ( 100%) materials will be o penly accessible for the world. There will be no restrictions. C4. List the equipment and software, with specifications, w hether purchased, leased or outs ourced, that will be used (e.g., camera, audio recording equipment, video reco rding equipment, encoding software, server). All equipment needed is already in place and is listed and described from the UF Digital Services website: http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/te chnologies/technologies.htm D. Creating New Software Applications, Inform ation Systems, or other Technology Based Tools D1. Describe type of application or system being created. N/A D2. List the programming languages, pla tforms, software, or other applications and their specifications being used. N/A as this is not a development project. The existing, robust so ftware in use by the Digital Library of the Caribbean (SobekCM Solr/Lucene, SobekCM METS Editor, et c) will be used. Full documentation on t he software is available online: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm D3. Describe disposition of ownership and use rights of new pr oduct. Describe how the new product will be made available to the public. Explain the terms of access and conditions of use. N/A as this is not a development project. Ho wever, the Digital Library of the Caribbe an software is available as open source an d is also available in comp iled versions for download: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/software D4. Describe how the tool extends or interoperates with existing applications, if applicable. N/A. For more on the ongoing development for existing tools that will be used in this project, see the SobekCM documentation pages: http://ufdc. ufl.edu/sobekcm D5. Describe the development documentation process and technical description of the final product.

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3 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. N/A. For more on the ongoing development for existing tools that will be used in this project, see the SobekCM documentation pages: http://ufdc. ufl.edu/sobekcm Part II. Answer all questions: 1. Specify each type of file format (e.g., TIFF, JPEG, MPEG) to be produced and anticipated quality (e.g. minimum resolution, depth, tone, pixel dimensions, file size, sampling rate) of ea ch. If producing digital image files please list the each type of image file produced (preservation maser, a ccess copy, and thumbnail, if applicable). Preservation Master: TIFF, MPG, OGG, etc; numbers and ty pes depend on the materials selected for digitization Access: JPG, JPG2000, TXT, PRO, METS, etc; numbers and types will depend on the materials selected for digitization Thumbnail: JPG 2. Describe the delivery medium that will be used (e.g. Internet, broadcast, DVD). Internet 3. Describe the underlying software used to manage and/or present digital content or hardware/software dependencies required to run the application or technology tool. SobekCM is the underlying technology (which also utilizes a SQL database, Solr/Lucene, and other technologies). Users will only need a web browser or other internet capable system. For instance, the materials will be accessible through the SobekPH iPhone apps and on mobile browsers. 4. Describe the quality control plan. All materials undergo 100% quality control. All materials are di gitized or digitally ingested and normalized to established dig ital preservation standards. 5. Explain how metadata (e.g. technical, descriptive, adminis trative, preservation,) will be produced and used to describe and manage digital content. Include the standar ds that will be used for data structure, content (e.g. thesauri), protocols, preser vation and administrative information and communication of the content (e.g., MARC, EAD, Dublin Core PBCore, PREMIS,VRA Core Categories, or Categories for the Description of Works of Art). All resources for this project will be loaded into SobekCM and so must conform to both t he national Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), as well as our local extensi on schemas. METS files include data about each file in a bibliographic resource, as well as descriptive and administrati ve information about the resource. The bibliographic information can be encoded in either Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) or Dublin Core. Proc essing information, and some bibliographic data, is encoded in a locally-defined schema. In addition to the main SobekCM extension schema, other project and resource specific extension schemas may be created. During the normal workflow at the Digital Library Center, METS files are created by the Quality Contro l Application, and then reviewed by our text te chnicians. Much of the bibliographic data for these METS files are imported from the catalogue record, when one exists. See this documentation fo rmore information: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm/metadata. 6. Describe plans for preservation and maintenance of the digita l files during and after the expiration of the grant period (i. e., storage systems, data standards, technical documentation, migration plans and commi tment of institutional funding). The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Floridaare committed to long-term digital preservation of all materials in the UF Digital Collections, including the IR@UF, and in UF-support ed collaborative projects as wi th the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC). Redundant digital archives, adherence to prov en standards, and rigorous qua lity control methods protect

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4 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. digital objects. The UF Digital Collections provide a compre hensive approach to digital preservation, including technical supports, reference services for both online and offline archived files, and support services by providing training and consult ation for digitization standards for long-term digital preservation. The Libraries support locally created digital resources, includi ng the UF Digital Collections which contains over 200,000 digital objects with over 20 m illion files (as of Sept ember 2011). The UF Libraries create METS/MODS metadata for all materials. Citation information for each digital object is also automatically transformed into MARCXML and Dublin Core. These records are widely distributed through library networks and through search engine optimization to ensure broad public access to all online materi als. In practice consistent for all digital projects and materials supported by the Libraries, redu ndant copies are maintained for all online and offline files. The digital archive is maintained by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) Completed by the FCLA in 2005, the Florida Digital Archive (FDA) (http://fclaweb.fcla.edu/fda) is available at no cost to Fl orida’s public university libraries. The software programmed t o support the FDA is modeled on the widely accepted Open Archiv al Information System. It is a dark archive and no public access functions are provided. It supports the preservation functions of format normalization, mass format migration and migration on request. As items are processed into the UF Digital Collec tions (UFDC) for public access, a command in the METS header directs a copy of the files to the Florida Digital Archive (FDA). The process of forwarding original files to the FDA is the ke y component in UF’s plan to store, maintain and protect electroni c data for the long term. If items are not directed to load for public access, they do not load online and are instead loaded directly to the FDA. 7. If content will be provided on the Internet, indicate agreement to submit collection level reco rds for digital products to t he IMLS Digital Collections Registry. State reas ons for selecting alternative approaches. All are available for inclusion via a MARCXML record feed, OA I, and general web searches. See this page for more on web crawlers: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/sobekcm/rob ots. All will be submitted to the IMLS Digital Collections Registry. 8. Provide URL(s) for applicant's previous digital products, if applicable. http://ufdc.ufl.edu http://dloc.com

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5 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. Part III. Developing Data Manage ment Plans for Research Projects IMLS encourages sharing of research data. The purpose of this section is to help IM LS understand a grant applicant’s research practices and plans for management of data that would be g enerated through a proposed res earch project. If the proposed project activities will generate datasets with the potential for future re-use or repurposing, answer the following questions. If there is not enough space on the form to provide complete ans wers to the questions, please copy the questions to a separate document, answer them fully, and incorporate the document (clear ly named so as to be identifiable) into the supporting documentation portion of the application. 1. Summarize the intended purpose of the research, the type of data to be collected or generated, the approximate dates when the data will be generated or collect ed, and the anticipated volume of data. n/a This grant is not involved with datasets 2. Does the proposed research activity generating the dataset(s) require approval by any internal or institutional review panel ? If so, has the proposed research activity already been approved? 3. Describe any potential issues with the data regarding confidential or private information about individuals, or proprietary information about organizations. What steps, if any, w ill be taken to protect such information from being disclosed? 4. If additional documentation such as consent agreements or si gned certifications will be co llected along with the data, describe plans for preserving the document ation and ensuring that its relationship to the collected data is maintained. 5. How will you manage intellectual property interests in the da taset(s)? Who will claim ownership of the intellectual property rights to the dataset(s)? How will those clai ms of ownership be communicated to others? 6. Which technologies, instruments or tools will be used to collect or generate the data? Provide details about hardware or software; electronic formats to be used for data capture or stor age; standards or local practices to be used for data content and encoding; controlled vocabularies or other mechanisms that will be used for data normalization and consistency; and any other relevant technical requirements or dependencies for understanding, retrieving, displaying or processing the dataset(s). If the data will be encr ypted at any point in its active or inactive life, explain the reasons for choosing to encr ypt the data and how the decryption key will be stored, protected, and made available if necessary. 7. What metadata will be captured or creat ed along with the dataset(s)? What metadat a standards or schema will be used to express the metadata? Where will the me tadata be stored, and in what format(s)? How will the metadata be permanently associated and managed with the dataset(s) it describes? 8. During the research project, where will the data and meta data be stored, and on what type of media? Who will have access to the data and/or copies of the data during the project? How many backup copies will be maintained during the active project, and how frequently will the backup copies be refres hed? Who will be responsible for data backup? Where will the backup copies of the data and met adata be stored during the project? 9. Once the research project is completed, what is the l ong-term plan for archiving, managing, and making the metadata and dataset(s) available (if applicable)? What steps will you ta ke to prepare the data for sharing (e.g., labeling missing data, standardizing formats, etc.)? 10. Will the dataset(s) and metadata be deposit ed in an institutional repository or a research community’s digital repository? If so, why was this repository selected? Does this repository enforce any access restrictions? When the dataset(s) is deposited, will it be subject to any access embargo period, a nd if so for how long? Does this repository already manage other research datasets and me tadata similar in attributes such as size and format? What preservation and backup procedures are used by this repository? Will the dataset(s) and metadata be maintained in this repository for a predetermined or indefinite period? Who will perform the de posit, including creating additional metadata that may be necessary at the time of deposit? If you do not intend to deposit the dataset and metadata into a repository, but do intend to share the data, what is your sharing strategy?

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6 | OMB Number 3137-0071, Ex piration date: 08/31/2013. 11. When and how frequently will this data managem ent plan and its implementation be reviewed?

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Supporting Document: References Cited American Association of Museums (2008). Considerations for AAM Accredited Museums Facing Retrenchment or Downsizing Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/survivalguide.cfm#down American Association of Muse ums (2011). U.S. Museums Conti nue to Serve Despite Stress. Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/upload/ACME11-report-FINAL.pdf American Association of Museums. (2012). Frequently Asked Question s About Museums. Retrieved from http://www.aam-us.org/aboutmuseums/abc.cfm#how_many Merritt, E., & American Association of Museums: Center for the Future of Museums. (2011 November 1). Future Studies 101: Implications Wheel. Retrieved from http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.com/2011/11/futures-studies-101-implications-wheel.html Banjo, S. (2010, May 20). Hit by the Downturn, Museums Seek Bailouts. Wall Street Journal Retrieved from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 4052748703691804575254 321564633624.html Cortez, A., Foster, W., & Smith Milway, K. (2009). No nprofit M&A: More Than a Tool for Tough Times. Retrieved from http://www.bridge span.org/Nonprofit-M-and-A.aspx Dilevko, J., & Gottlieb, L. (2003) Resurrecting a Neglected Idea: The Reintroduction of Library-Museum Hybrids. The Library Quarterly, 73 (2), 160-198. Dilevko, J., & Gottlieb, L. (2004). Evolution of library and museum par tnerships: Historical antecedents, contemporary manifestat ions and future directions. Available from: http://www.powells.com/biblio/959781122286879-0 Dobrzynski, J. H. (2009, December 17 ). RIP: Museum Closures In 2009 -Not A Huge Toll, Actually UPDATED. Retrieved from http://www.artsjournal.co m/realcleararts/2009/12/museum-closures.html Dornseif, K. A. (2001). Joint Use Librarie s: Balancing Autonomy and Cooperation. Resource Sharing & Information Networks 15(1-2), 103-116. Ferrari, M. (Writer), & Ives, S. (Director). (2010, January 24). Panama Canal In A. Pollak (Producer), American Experience Public Broadcasting Services. Florida Museum of Natural History. (2010). Panama Canal Project: Partnerships for International Research and Education. Retrieved from http ://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/panama-pire/ Greene, J. (2009). The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal New York: Penguin Press. International Federation of Library A ssociations and Institutions. (2008). Public Libraries, Archives and Museums: Trends in Collaboration and Cooperation (Professional Reports No. 108). The Hague, Netherlands: A. Yarrow, B. Clubb, & J. Draper.

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Jacobs, J. A. (2008, July). All About Mergers of Nonprofit Organizations. Association Law & Policy Retrieved from http://www.pillsburylaw.com/si teFiles/Publications /E59EB05159610F1A1618CE C694535E42.pdf Kretzmann, J. P., & Mc Knight, J. L. (1993). Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Communitys Assets Evanston, Illinois: Second Printing. Lincoln Y.S., & Guba E.G. (1989). Fourth Generation Evaluation Newbury Park, CA: Sage. McGuiness, A. (2008). Path of Empire: Panama and the California Gold Rush. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Owen, J.M. (2007). Program evaluation: forms and approaches (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press. Panama Canal Museum Board of Directors. (2008). Panama Canal Museum. Retrieved from http://panamacanalmuseum.org/ Reed, R., & Dowd, S., (2009). Merge Minnesota: Nonprofit merger as an opportunity for survival and growth. Retrieved from http://nonprof itfinancefund.org/files/images/ini tiatives/mergeminnesota_mapfor nonprofits.pdf Roosevelt, T. (1910). To The Emplo yees In The Administration Building, Culebra, Canal Zone, November 16 1906. In, Presidential Addresses and State Papers (Vol. 5) (p. 861-869). New York: P.F. Collier & Son. Russell, S. (2008). Putting good will to the test: Nonprof its find mergers can be a messy business at times. Retrieved from http://www. minnpost.com/stories/2008/06/23/2307/putting_good_will_to_the _test_nonprofits_find_mergers_ca n_be_a_messy_business_at_times Wilder Research, & MAP for Nonprofits. (2011). What do we know about nonprofit mergers?. Retrieved from http://www.mapfornonprofit s.org/vertical/Sites/{876C4FB8-E997-480F-BF5BAFAA0F113D9D}/uploads/MAP_LiteratureReview_3-11_revised.pdf Wood, J. (2011, Fall/Winter). Panama Canal Museum Review 11 (2) Seminole, Florida: Panama Canal Museum

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January 13, 2011 Judith C. Russell, Dean University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries PO Box 1170 00 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Ms. Russell: This letter confirms the Florida Association of Museum's (FAM) strong support for the project to merge with the Panama Canal Museum (PCM) and to share information about these activities with others in the museum world. I had been concerned about the future of the collections at PCM having heard that it was closing its operations in Seminole. I know that the University of Florida has the means to support both the collection and cultivate the community who is very engaged in this part of history. Your project will preserve a portion of history that will not be repeated, but that is so important to the expansion of the Canal, World Trade and the study of a workforce. Your creative solution to maintaining and preserving the collection and providing greater access is an unexpected positive result. I'm aware of other museums that have taken steps or are involved in other activities that threaten their collections and future access by the general public. For example, the Brogan Museum board is planning to sell collection items to satisfy their debt, certainly not the intent of the museum's mission. FAM supports the methods outlined in your proposal to care for, grow and exhibit the collections while nurturing its constituents in the way a typical museum would do. Florida has experienced its share of museum closures, most ly handled through best practices. We think showing additional practical examples of how it can be done properly demonstrates our dedication to continuing the practice of the highest museum standards. Members of FAM will be eager to learn about the journey and lessons learned during this interesting and unique process. Actual cases of mergers are not generally shared among museums and this will be an excellent historical case for this purpose. FAM confirms our contribution to the project, to promote two virtual conferences on the topic of mergers and collaborations, hosted by UF Libraries; and, to promote and host presentations to our membership during upcoming annual conferences in 201315. Respectfully, Malinda J. Horton Executive Director

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ITHAKA helps the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. BOARD OF TRUSTEES Kevin M. Guthrie President Henry S. Bienen Chairman Paul A. Brest Vice-Chairman William G. Bowen Nancy M. Cline Ira H. Fuchs Eugene Y. Lowe, Jr W. Drake McFeely Michele Tolela Myers David Pakman Judith Shapiro Jeffrey A. Sine Stephen M. Stigler Charles M. Vest Herbert S. Winokur, Jr January 23, 2012 Judith C. Russell, Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida 535 Library West PO Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy: I am delighted to endorse your proposed Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grant. It is a project I know well, because in the preliminary planning stages, while i was Associate Librarian Congress, your staff met with mine to identify Panama Canal items of national interest and those that would have historical significance internationally. We spoke of the importance of providing Internet access to documents, museum items, indigenous and historical materials, and how the design of the Centennial exhibits and their digitization would take a collaborative effort, nationally and internati onally, to represent the importance of the Panama Canal in the history of the United States. Your plan to partner informally with and utilize information, lesson plans and vital advice from Library of Congress staff to supplement the research supplied by your inte rnational group of Panama Canal curators and historians, will enhance the collaborati on of your more formal grant partners. Engaging a community of subject experts, cultivating and encouraging the variety and type of metadata that can best be supplied by the community involved, and preserving items that reflect cultural, sociological, and ethnographic snapshots of this time in history that was of such significance to World Trade, health, engineering and

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innovation, while modeling how academic environments preserve and make accessible special collections, will be one of the primar y and ultimate outcomes of the grant. As you well have established, the financial ch allenges facing all such collections are monumental; collaboration is key to preser ving our history and our collections. With the potential for an increasing number of museum closures, there is a real need to identify Best Practices in collaboration. Given the administrative and technological infrastructure available on the university campus, and the geographic synergy of merging with a museum located within the state, and given the ability of the University of Florida to support this effort through long-established collaborations, there is an efficiency to developing this model in Florida. Currently your Florida Museum of Natural History is participating in Na tional Science Foundation paleontological research during the Canal expansion project, a nd the strength of your relationships in Latin America has never been stronger. One goal for your project includes establishing the trust necessary to preserve history through the gathering of collective knowledge, oral histories and ephemera from a highly specialized and aging population that spans international cultures. Working with sociologists and museum specialists to articulate the work-life challenges inherent in the early 20 th century Panama through present day opportunities for the expansion helps share the value of this collection while providing access to materials that impact libraries, museums and universities. The project will allow you three years to establish foundation procedures and outcomes that will be shared and discussed at national and international events, gathering breadth through input and dissemination. I applaud your work, and I am happy to add support and encouragement as you progress with your proposal. Sincerely, Deanna Marcum Managing Director, S+R ITHAKA

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H on R obert S. M artin P h .D. P. O. Box 795651 Dallas, Texas 75379-5651 January 25, 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville FL 32611-7000 Dear Dean Russell: I am pleased to have the opportunity to write in support of your application to the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a grant to fund the work associated with merging the collection of the Panama Canal Museum with the University of Florida Libraries. Museums often collaborate with libraries and academic institutions to extend the reach of their exhibitions, to provide enhanced access to their collections, and to build intersecting communities of practice. Beyond this, when threatened with the extinction of the institution itse lf, museums have transferred their collections in whole or in part to a library in orde r to ensure that they will continue to be preserved and made available. The project that you propose, however, goes far beyond those kinds of mundane and routine collaborations. You plan to take custody of the entire collection of the museum, which articulate well with your existing collections, creating enhanced synergies. Beyond this, however, you also plan to engage and maintain the community of the museum and sustain its identity and members. This is a unique and challenging proposition. I has the potential to be a model for how libraries can do more than merely assume responsibility for collections when small museums are forced to close. I heartily endorse you proposal and strongly encourage IMLS to give it a high priority for funding. Sincerely, Robert S. Martin Professor Emeritus Texas Woman's University

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The Foundation of the Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere 200 Walker Hall P.O. Box 118030 Gainesville, FL 326 11 tel. 352.392.0796 fax 352.392 53 78 www.humanities.ufl.edu 25 January 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, I am writing to confirm my enthusiastic participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project at the University of Florida (UF) should it be successfully awarded funding by the IMLS. I agree to serve as project evaluator in all levels of planning and implementation during the grant period, 1 October 2012 through 30 September 2015, for $18,963. I am a nine-month faculty member, and this sum represents 36% of my summer salary for three years. Although the bulk of interviewing, formal analysis, and reporting would take place during these summer months, the ongoing ethnographic and observational components of the evaluation would be part of my professional research activities on a year-round basis. I expect to spend 10% of my time during my nine-month employment working on the project, including attending planning meetings, observing collection processing and metadata retrieval, and traveling to meet with PCS members. Having previously conducted qualitative evaluations looking at museum curation, library and publishing innovation, academic scholarly practices, and public engagement with scholarly work, the proposed Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project is an exciting opportunity for me to produce a professional evaluation that builds on my research interests in cultural heritage institutions. The tremendous opportunity for us to preserve and celebrate this important period in history also offers an important activity to bring together research partners from around UF and beyond. I intend through my evaluation to inform a demonstration model of museum-library integrations for the museum and library communities, and also to provide a model for catalyzing cross-campus research and public engag ement initiatives at UF. This falls directly in line with the Center for the Humanities and the Public critical and collaborative discussions of the humanities that reach across and beyond individual disciplines outreach to the community in which we live and teach Thank you for your consideration, and please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions. Sincerely, Sophia Krzys Acord, Ph.D. Associate Director, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere Lecturer, Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Patrice Brown To Panama Canal Advisory Group; Schipper,Rachel A Cc Russell,Judith; de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Thursday, January 26, 2012 10:36 AM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Patrice C. Brown Patrice Brown Archivist, ANDC National Declassification Center National Archives and Records Administration Re: Immediate assistance please Sunday, January 29, 2012 5:39 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Panama Canal Harn speaker costs From de Farber, Bess Gail To de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Monday, January 30, 2012 2:35 PM From: braeburnnc@gmail.com [ mailto:braeburnnc@gmail.com ] On Behalf Of Edith Crouch Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2011 2:45 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Re: FW: A quick favor Dear Rachel, It was a pleasure to talk with you this morning. Thank you for the invitation to be part of the University of Florida's celebration of Panama weekend in 2014. I'd be very pleased to give a talk about molas at this event. I have put together a cost estimate for travel expenses (flights, car rental, meals for arriving Fri. 8/15 and departing Monday 8/18 you mentioned in your email that you would work on hotel costs so those are not included) and have arrived at approximately $1200. I would waive any additional honorarium it is an honor to be invited! I hope this is helpful as you prepare the information for the grant submittal. I would also be very pleased to assist with any mola information compilation as you prepare to exhibit the molas from the Panama Canal Museum's donation and/or others. Many thanks, Rachel! Best regards, Edie FW: Panama Canal Harn speaker costs Monday, January 30, 2012 2:36 PM General Page 1

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btn fr rbrtrbbr b !brbbr rbrt"brf #$#rbbt% &'()*nnn rr"$+,*nnn bft.!//t0rb!!t/br0r/rr",&!1!!bb2&! r/b30r0)00bb!.1 .bbbt0fbrb/brf'0bnb$n /!b n#b45#6nnnr0rb,bf)/7r46nnn/bft b0!t/brb6fbft/bbtb.!//t8b98r0,&.f /bb:rb!/b30rfbb,tb/ .8r/brfrbt600/r;r68brrfrrfr6/b0f/r0t0 rrrfbfbr0fbrr/brfr//b/b30&.6"6b b0ffrbtfr6&10!!rt6f0brrrr 7r/b30!t//bfr88r!t0/br:t6r8b98rtrfr!/bf/br0 !f//brbr00br0bbtbf!r0rbbrf98f2 brrrrbt (bbf6 rfbbt 1r&br0r/ btnnfrn rrnfrr rb bnnfrnrf !"#!$%!&'$ b tnnfrn frrfrn ( nr)f

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Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funded is successful in securing funding from IMLS. I agree to serve as a speaker during the 2014-2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Ronald J. de Heer M.Sc. (Civil Engineering) Senior lecturer Hydraulic Engineering Unesco-IHE (retired) Guest-conservator of the National Dredging Museum, Sliedrecht, The Netherlands

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Subject FW: Immediate assistance please From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Monday, January 30, 2012 2:56 PM ----Original Message ----From: Julie Greene [ mailto:jmg@umd.edu ] Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 5:43 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: RE: Immediate assistance please Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Julie Greene Julie Greene Professor and Director of Graduate Studies History Department University of Maryland at College Park 2131 Francis Scott Key Hall College Park, MD 20742 ph: 301 405 4267 fax: 301 314 9399 ________________________________________ Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 FW: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:58 PM General Page 1

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I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, General Page 2

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Russell,Judith To Jones,Douglas S Cc Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group; de Farber, Bess Gail Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 11:50 PM Many thanks! Judy -------------------Judith C. Russell jcrussell@ufl.edu Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Douglas Jones On Jan 24, 2012, at 9:44 PM, "Jones,Douglas S" < dsjones@flmnh.ufl.edu > wrote: Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:27 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Response from Aims From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 3:28 PM ----Original Message ----From: aimsmcguinness@gmail.com [ mailto:aimsmcguinness@gmail.com ] On Behalf Of Aims McGuinness Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 3:25 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Response from Aims Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Aims McGuinness -Aims McGuinness Associate Professor Dept. of History U. of Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI 53201 0413 Tel: 414 229 4227/Fax: 414 229 2435 Email: smia@uwm.edu FW: Response from Aims Monday, January 30, 2012 2:15 PM General Page 1

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Paul Morgan To Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group Cc de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith; Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 4:03 PM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Paul Morgan, Ph.D Trustee, Panama Canal Museum University of South Florida Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:07 PM General Page 1

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Subject RE: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal From Sobha Jaishankar To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Russell,Judith; Wilson,Kathleen A Sent Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:45 PM Judy, Bess, This is to confirm that the Office of Research will provide a total of $101,797 in support of your application for the IMLS grant, if your grant is funded. Good luck with your proposal! Sobha Sobha Jaishankar, Ph. D. Asst. Vice President for Research, University of Florida, 223 Grinter Hall, PO Box 115500, Gainesville, FL 32611 Ph: (352) 392 8247 Fax: (352) 846 0491 Email: sjaishan@ufl.edu http://www.research.ufl.edu/researchsupport / From: de Farber, Bess Gail Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 4:50 PM To: Sobha Jaishankar Cc: Russell,Judith Subject: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal Importance: High Sobha, So sorry for the delay in getting the attached request to you. Please let me know if you require additional information. opportunities. Best, Bess Bess de Farber Libraries Grants Manager University of Florida Libraries PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Phone: (352) 273 2519; FAX: (352) 392 7251 RE: Request for Office of Research Support IMLS Proposal Tuesday, January 31, 2012 8:54 AM General Page 1

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UFFLORIDA George A. Smathers Ubraries 535 Libf, ry West Office of the Dean of University Librar i c PO B x l 17000 ;a incsv illc, PL 32611-7000 352-273-2505 352 392-7251 Fax www.uflib. ufl.edu January 24, 2012 Sobha Jaishankar, Ph.D. Assistant V ice President Office of Research 223 Grinter Hall Gainesville FL 32611 Dear Sobha As we discussed in our meeting earlier this month, I am submitting this request for funding to support the Libraries IMLS National Leadership Grant proposal entitled: "The Panama Canal-Preserving a Legacy, Celebrating a Centennial, Leveraging an Extraordinary Human Achievement: building new models ofstewardship, public engagement and governance for academic libraries." Attached you will find a budget summary ofthe cash request to IMLS for the three-year grant period indicating a total request of$499,995, ofwhich 33.6% ($125,747) is IDC, augmented by a contribution of$101,797 from the Office of Research, which we plan to use for speaker fees in country travel, fabrication of an exhibit OPS for digitization services, and partial salary and benefits for a temporary employee (Friends ofthe Panama Canal Museum Collection Liaison) These expenses directly support the Libraries capacity to complete this project successfully and reflect our discussion and consensus on a means to achieve this result. I also want to reaffirm my understanding fiom our conversation that the contribution fiom the Office of Research is in addition to the Libraries receipt of its portion ofthe IDC, which is 22.6% ofthe value ofthe total direct costs. Please let me know if you have any questions, or feel fi ee to contact Bess de Farber (273-2519, bdefarber@uil. du ) directly, for further information. Sincerely, Attachment: budget summary The Foundation for The Gator Nation 1\11 Ec]unl ( I Institut i on

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Jan. 3 0 201 2 2:5 6 P M Samue l P r octo r O r a l Hist o r y P r g m No.0477 P 2 OFIFLORIDA SAMUEL PROCTOR ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM 241 Pugh Hall Dr. Paul Ortiz, Director P.O. Box 115215 Tamarra Jen.kitl8, Office Manager Gainesville, FL 32611-5215 Office: (352) 392-7168 Fax: (352) 846-1983 www.da $.ufl.edu/history/ oral Dear Judy, Please accept this letter confirming my participation in the Panama Canal Museum prcU<:ct I will continue to coordinate/supervise the effort to record oral histories during each swnmer reunion in 2013, 2014 and 2015 as previously accomplished during past years. I support your efforts to record this jnvaluable information related to the stories behind the building of the Canal and those who lived in the Zone. This project has my full support.....anything else you would like to say about the impol1: ance ofthis project in terms ofboth saving valuable historical material and objects and ensuring the continuance and effectiveness of those who have been the stewards ofthese collections. The Foundationfor The Gator Nation Ilq\lal Aotion WlillUioll

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Paul Sutter To Schipper,Rachel A Cc Panama Canal Advisory Group; de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith Sent Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Paul Sutter Paul Sutter Associate Professor of History Environmental Studies Core Faculty 212 Hellems Hall UCB 234 Boulder, CO 80309 303 492 6208 paul.sutter@colorado.edu Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:08 PM General Page 1

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Subject FW: Immediate assistance please From Schipper,Rachel A To de Farber, Bess Gail Cc Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:04 PM From Frank Townsend: ----Original Message ----From: ftown@ce.ufl.edu [ mailto:ftown@ce.ufl.edu ] Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:02 PM To: Schipper,Rachel A Subject: Re: Immediate assistance please Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Frank C. Townsend FW: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:24 PM General Page 1

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution College of Fine Arts 101 Fine Arts Building C School of Art and Art History PO Box 115801 Gainesville, FL 32611-5801 352392-0201 352392-8453 Fax January 25, 2012 Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611-7000 Dear Judy, I look forward to participating in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if the proposa l is successful in securing funding from IMLS. I agree to serve as a museum expert advisor during the grant period, October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2015, for an annual honorarium of $1,000. This project would seem to be perfect for the University of Florida because of the way that the collection matches the strengths of the library and the academic faculty aligned with the Center for Latin American Studies. There are countless numbers of ways that my students will benefit from the movement of the coll ection to the university and its dissemination to campus groups and the general public. Thi s project has my full support, and I think it is an excellent IMLS project. Sincerely, Glenn Willumson Director of the Graduate Program in Museum Studies Professor of Art History

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Subject Re: Immediate assistance please From Joseph Wood To Schipper,Rachel A; Panama Canal Advisory Group Cc de Farber, Bess Gail; Russell,Judith; Schipper,Rachel A Sent Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:28 PM Judith C. Russell Dean of University Libraries George A. Smathers Libraries University of Florida PO Box 117000 Gainesville, FL 32611 7000 Dear Judy, This confirms my participation in the Panama Canal Museum merger and centennial project if funding is successfully secured from the IMLS. I agree to serve as an advisory group member and speaker (if applicable) during the 2014 2015 Centennial Celebration. This project has my full support. Sincerely, Joe Wood President Panama Canal Museum Re: Immediate assistance please Monday, January 30, 2012 2:40 PM Joe Wood email support (2) Page 1

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Florida Libraries Page 26 !!!!! I&$/'(&, )(/ 1)2$.&8 )"' '(%)%'/ *( &!' C)().X, !! 5*#.#%*2).+ 6).'#(&#.#%*2).! )(/ %'#.#%*2). #$&"')2! )(/! "',')"2! /$"*(% &!*, $(*T$'! #66#"&$(*&8 &# ,&$/8 &!' !! '?2)4)&*#(; N(2' 2#(,&"$2&*#( *, 2#-6.'&'/+ &!' )"')! 3*.. 5' $(/'"3)&'" )(/ (# .#(%'" ),! '),*.8 )22',,*5.'; !!!!!!!!!!! =!' KJ @*5")"*', )"' $&*.*0*(% &!' B)()-) C)(). !! 2#..'2&*#(, *( -)(8 3)8, )(/ 6"#4*/*(% )22',, &!"#$%! /*%*&*0)&*#(; D)&'"*)., )"' 1"'T$'(&.8 /*%*&*0'/ *( .*5")"*', )(/ -$,'$-,+ 5#&! 1#" 6"','"4)&*#( 6$"6#,',+ )(/ &# !! 6"#4*/' L(&'"('& )22',,! &# &!#,' 3!# )"' %'#%")6!*2)..8! /*,&)(& 1"#! &!' 2#..'2&*#(,; B'#6.' 3!#! )"' (#& )5.' &# &")4'. &# J.#"*/) 2)( (#3! )22',,! *&'-,! )(/ '?!*5*&, 4*) &!' B)()-)! )(/ &!' C)(). C#..'2&*#(, 3*&!*( &!' KJ \*%*&).! C#..'2&*#(, !&&6GHH$1/2;$1.;'/$H62; !!!!!!!!!!!!! D)&'"*)., &!)& )"' *( 5"*&&.' 2#(/*&*#( #" 3!*2! "'T$*"' ,6'2*). !)(/.*(% 3*.. 5' /*%*&*0'/ )& &!' \*%*&).! @*5")"8 !! C'(&'"! E\@CF )& &!' >)*(',4*..' 2)-6$,; W##9,! )(/ &'?& *&'-, &!)& )"' %'('")..8 *( %##/ 2#(/*&*#( 3*.. 5' #$&" ,#$"2'/ &!"#$%!! @bZMILI &# L(&'"('&! M"2!*4' ELMF+ ) 2#" 6)(8 &!)& 6"#4*/', ,2)((*(% )(/ '?&'"(). !#,&*(% 1#" /*%*" &). 2#(&'(&; M, &!' &")(,1'" #1 2#..'2&*#(,! )(/ -)&'"*)., !! 2#(&*($', &!"#$%! _$.8 AR

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Fall 2011 Page 27 Dr. Rachel A. Schipper is the Associate Dean for Technology and Support Services at the University of Florida Libraries and is a board member of the Panama Canal Museum. She coordinates the team who is working to transfer the museum collections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g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